Category: Drama

Summary: Filmmaker Elia Suleiman travels to various cities and finds new parallels to his home country Palestine wherever he goes.

Year: 2019

Australian Cinema Release Date: 2nd July 2020

Thailand Cinema Release Date: NA

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: France, Qatar, Germany, Canada, Turkey, Palestine

Director: Elia Suleiman

Screenwriter: Elia Suleiman

Cast: Elia Suleiman (ES)

Running Time: 102 mins

Classification: M (Australia)

 

 

OUR IT MUST BE HEAVEN REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths’ It Must Be Heaven Review:

It Must Be Heaven is not an easy film to write about. That is largely due to the fact that there has never been a film like this before. The best thing to say is probably that this is a film that will divide audiences. For every audience member that sees this film as a visionary work of art there will be somebody else watching the clock and wondering when it is going to end.

Even describing the film itself is not an easy task. Basically it is filmmaker Elia Suleiman (The Time That Remains) travelling the world and finding parallels to his home country of Palestine wherever he goes. Even that description makes the film sound like a documentary – which it is not. Suleiman’s journey is brought to the screen by a series of scenes (think short films) that are linked together by the fact that he is a witness to all the events that happen in front of him.

Whether or not the humour of those short pieces work for you all depends on whether or not you understand the parallel that Suleiman is trying to make about his home-land and what kind of humour wets your appetite. One of the joys of the film I found though is the fact that nearly everyone I know who has seen the film takes away different meanings from the scenes themselves. For example the scene in New York where everyone in the supermarket is armed. Is that drawing a parallel to what life is like in Palestine or is it making a comment about America’s gun culture. An audience member could take either away from the scene and to be honest you couldn’t call either wrong.

One thing that you do find with the film though is that it contains a very rare beauty. In a day where action films and CGI effects flood our cinemas it is refreshing to find a film that creates spectacle using the old fashioned style of filmmaking that relied on the director and cinematographer to bring beauty to the screen. Here Suleiman and cinematographer Sofian El Fani have exquisitely framed every shot to the point where at times it feels like you are looking at a piece of artwork on a gallery wall.

Likewise the presence of Suleiman more than makes up for the fact that he delivers very little dialogue throughout the film. He has the same kind of comedic presence as Larry David and as a result seems to be able to say more with a look or a stare than he could with a whole slab of dialogue. It seems strange to say because of the style of his performance but his acting work here is nothing short of amazing.

It Must Be Heaven is not the kind of film that you can recommend to everyone. If you love Marvel movies and big explosions then this isn’t the film for you, but if you enjoy a movie that makes you think and will stay with you a long time once the credits role then this is a film that you certainly check out.

 

 

 

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:

 

 

IMDB Rating: It Must Be Heaven (2019) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment It Must Be Heaven Reviews:

Nil

 

Trailer:

Summary: A detemined journalist hunts down the solider that was in charge of her brother’s unit when he disappeared. She is shocked to find though that the incident has left the solider facing demons of his own.

Year: 2019

Australian Cinema Release Date: NA

Thailand Cinema Release Date: NA

Australian DVD Release Date: 10th June 2020

Country: Australia, United Arab Emirates

Director: Storm Ashwood

Screenwriter: Storm Ashwood

Cast: Gus Bohn (Billy), Warwick Comber (Father Batty), Firass Dirani (Welshy), Jai Godbold (Tan), Sonny Le (Thong), Steve Le Marquand (Carl Boddi), Jett Lowen (Bo), Josh McConville (Seth), Lydia Mocerino (Imogen), Rena Owen (Michelle Pennyshaw), Natalie Rees (Sarah), Jessi Robertson (Lizzy), Hugh Sheridan (Josh), Bonnie Sveen (Rebecca), Juwan Sykes (Stretch), Oliver Wenn (Phil)

Running Time: 92 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia) TV-14 (USA)

 

 

OUR ESCAPE AND EVASION REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths’ Escape And Evasion Review:

Often in cinema we see war glorified. The action star seemingly singlehandedly taking on a whole Army and coming out on top. Occasionally we do get to see the thought-provoking war film – films like Saving Private Ryan or Hacksaw Ridge that such us the horrors of the battle field and have us questioning whether or not war is the necessity that we are led to believe it is.

What we rarely get to see though is the aftermath of war. What happens when the solider has left the battlefield and is now back at home trying to live an everyday life? Or what happens when somebody doesn’t return from war, is there family left wondering how they died? Was it quick, was it slow?

Those are the themes that Australian filmmaker Storm Ashwood (School) chooses to focus on in his latest film Escape And Evasion and the result is a sensational film made even better by the performance of a leading man that deserves to pick up an award or two for his portrayal of a returned soldier at breaking point.

The plot is driven by Rebecca (Bonnie Sveen – Home And Away) a determined journalist who is trying to find out what happened to her solider brother who never returned from active service in Burma. To her frustration she finds that there is no record of what happened or even what Australian soldiers were doing there.

She finally hunts down the man that was in charge of her brother’s unit – Seth (Josh McConville – Fantasy Island) – a soldier who is so haunted by his experience that he has turned to alcohol to try and cover the pain. That has left him with a torn apart family but helps him deal with the secrets that his superior, Michelle Pennyshaw (Rena Owen – Once Were Warriors), asks him to keep.

As a film Escape And Evasion never gives its audience a chance to take a break. Whether it be tense dialogue-driven scenes between Seth and Michelle or Seth and Rebecca or combat sequences Atwood floods the film with tension. Instead of making the film an uncomfortable watch this instead just adds to the experience. You literally feel the tension building inside as you become desperate to know what happened to Rebecca’s brother and what the hell occurred that has left Seth the broken man that he is now.

Ashwood may well be one of the directional finds of 2020. His debut feature film – School – did show us that there was a gifted director just waiting to break out. While some were sceptical of the film it did show an artistic side and was brave enough to be different than other films in its genre. With Escape And Evasion Ashwood loses the artistic or experimental side but again goes about things differently as he mixes tense dramatic scenes between characters with emotional charged war and torture scenes. The result is a well-rounded film that leaves the audience not asking any questions at all.

Even with all the brilliance that the director shows with this film it would have fallen in a heap if he did not have the right leading man to bring the story to the screen. Luckily Ashwood found the exact right person to have play Seth in the form of under-rated Australian actor Josh McConville. With known actors like Hugh Sheridan (Packed To The Rafters) and Steve La Marquand (Last Train To Freo) also attached to the project you could easily understand if Ashwood had given one of them the leading role. Instead though he takes a chance on McConville who repays him with one of the best performances you are likely to see on screen in 2020.

Escape And Evasion is one of the cinematic shining lights of this year. An intense and dramatic film – it is one of those movies you will find wanting to watch two or three times to really embrace it. One thing the film will leave you with though is the knowledge that Josh McConville and Storm Ashwood need to be noticed by Hollywood.

 

 

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:

 

 

IMDB Rating:  Escape and Evasion (2019) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Escape And Evasion Reviews:

Nil

 

Trailer:

 Stan has today announced that the brand new event series The Comey Rulestarring Jeff Daniels (The Newsroom) as former FBI Director James Comey and Brendan Gleeson (Mr. Mercedes) as President Donald J. Trump, will premiere on back-to-back nights in late November.

The two-part, four-hour event series was adapted for the screen and directed by Oscar® nominated screenwriter Billy Ray (Captain Phillips, Shattered Glass) and executive produced by Shane Salerno, Alex Kurtzman, Heather Kadin and Ray.

Based on Comey’s No. 1 New York Times best-selling book A Higher Loyalty, and more than a year of additional interviews with a number of key principals, The Comey Rule  is an immersive, behind-the-headlines account of the historically turbulent events surrounding the 2016 presidential election and its aftermath, which divided a nation.

The Comey Rule is not a biopic of one man, but is instead the story of two powerful figures, Comey and Trump, whose strikingly different personalities, ethics and loyalties put them on a collision course.

The Comey Rule  takes us on an insider’s journey down the corridors of power, where decision-makers struggle to apply old norms to a dramatic new paradigm in the face of Russia’s deep and unprecedented penetration into American politics, with a nation’s rule of law hanging in the balance. Each character’s actions in these historic months made the careers of some, destroyed the careers of others and helped shape the incendiary political landscape we live in today. Part one of the series examines the earliest days of the Russia investigation, the FBI’s investigation into Hillary Clinton’s emails and their impact on Election Night 2016, when Donald Trump stunned the world and was elected president. Part two is a virtual day-by-day account of the tempestuous relationship between Comey and Trump and the intense and chaotic first months of the Trump presidency – where allies became enemies, enemies became friends and truth depended on what side you were on.

The Comey Rule features an ensemble of Oscar, Emmy, Golden Globe®and Tony® winning talent, including Holly Hunter (The Piano) as former Acting Attorney General Sally Yates, Michael Kelly (Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan) as former FBI Director Andrew McCabe, Jennifer Ehle (Zero Dark Thirty) as Patrice Comey, Scoot McNairy (Halt and Catch Fire) as former Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, Jonathan Banks (Better Call Saul) as former National Intelligence Director James Clapper, Oona Chaplin (Game of Thrones) as former FBI lawyer Lisa Page, Amy Seimetz (The Girlfriend Experience) as former FBI lawyer Trisha Anderson, Steven Pasquale (The People v. O. J. Simpson: American Crime Story) as former FBI agent Peter Strzok, Peter Coyote (The Disappearance) as Robert Mueller and Kingsley Ben-Adir (High Fidelity) as President Barack Obama. Steve Zissis (Togetherness), Shawn Doyle (House of Cards), Brian d’Arcy James (Spotlight), Dalmar Abuzeid (Anne with an E), William Sadler (When They See Us), Richard Thomas (Tell Me Your Secrets), T.R. Knight (Grey’s Anatomy), Joe Lo Truglio (Brooklyn Nine-Nine), Spencer Garrett (Bombshell), Michael Hyatt (Crazy Ex-Girlfriend), Damon Gupton (Black Lightning) and Seann Gallagher (Good Witch) also star.

The Comey Rule will premiere late November, only on Stan. Airdate to be announced soon.

 

Summary: With the backdrop of 1950s Brooklyn a young Private Investigator decides to try and solve the crime that led to his boss’s death.

Year: 2020

Australian Cinema Release Date: 27th February 2020

Thailand Cinema Release Date: TBA

Australian DVD Release Date: 30th May 2020

Country: United States

Director: Edward Norton

Screenwriter: Edward Norton, Jonathan Letham (novel)

Cast: Nelson Avidon (Jacob Gleason), Alec Baldwin (Moses Randolph), Bobby Canavale (Tony Vermonte), Willem Dafoe (Paul Randolph), Cherry Jones (Gabby Horowitz), Leslie Mann (Julia Minna), Gugu Mbartha-Raw (Laura Rose), Edward Norton (Lionel Essrog), Joyce O’Connor (Cindy Fleming), Josh Pais (William Lieberman), Dallas Roberts (Danny Fanti),  Fisher Stevens (Lou), Ethan Suplee (Gilbert Coney), DeShawn White (Betty), Bruce Willis (Frank Minna), Robert Wisdom (Billy Rose)

Running Time: 124 mins

Classification: M (Australia), TBC (Thailand), 15 (UK), R (USA)

 

 

OUR MOTHERLESS BROOKLYN REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths’ Motherless Brooklyn Review:

Over the years I have always found myself intrigued by those people in Hollywood whose careers seem to go through weird unexplained ups and downs. Two examples are Keanu Reeves and Ethan Hawke – both actors were at the top their game and then suddenly just seemed to have a string of straight-to-DVD movies, some of which were so good that you couldn’t help but wonder why they never received the cinema release they so deserved.

Another that should be on that list is Edward Norton as a filmmaker. Flashback twenty years ago and on the hunch of a friend I watched a movie with one of the weirdest synopsis of all time. The film was called Keeping The Faith and featured Ben Stiller as a Rabbi and Norton as a Priest, they then both fall in love with the same woman played by then television darling Jenna Elfman. It was an interesting enough film, but was also the only film that Norton had directed right up to this year. That is surprising when you consider that as a filmmaker his debut film was a success and that he has actuallu been linked to a number of other films over the years. Now twenty years later Norton helms Motherless Brooklyn, one of the most criminally under-rated films of 2020.

Based on a novel by Jonathan Lethem (which is now on my must read list) Motherless Brooklyn is set in 1950s New York and follows the story of a lonely Private Detective suffering from Tourettes named Lionel Essrog (Norton – Hulk). When his boss Frank Minna (Bruce Willis – Signs) is killed Lionel decides to take over his case and soon finds himself lost in a world of crime, underground jazz clubs and politics.

For me to give away too much of the plot of Motherless Brooklyn would be criminal. All I will say is that it is a film that contains all the elements that a great noir Detective story should have. Intrigue, suspense, a plot with twists and turns at every point and of course the Femme Fatale that you are never really sure can be trusted or not – here beautifully played by Gugu Mbatha-Raw (Belle).

What won me over with this film though is the brilliant plot and an amazing performance by Norton and the cast around him. I love a film that I can’t predict the twists and turns of and that is certainly the case here. As characters like Paul (Willem Dafoe – Spider-Man) and Moses Randolph (Alec Baldwin – The Departed) come into Lionel’s world it is impossible to tell who is telling the truth and who is lying.

I’ll be honest there were times that Motherless Brooklyn had me on the edge of my seat. It felt like Norton may have grown up on the same dose of Humphrey Bogart movies I did as he is the kind of director that has learnt that you don’t a huge action sequence to raise suspense, he can skilfully achieve that same intensity from tipping the audience off to the fact that a character is being untruthful or is concealing a weapon. For me there were times when this was almost heart-in-mouth kind of stuff and that is one of the reasons why this film will stay with me for a long time.

I can only describe this film as the perfect noir thriller. I was stunned at Norton’s brilliant, but reined in performance in which he manages to juggle Tourettes’ ticks with strong suspenseful scenes alongside some of the Hollywood’s elite. Given that he juggles that with directional duties on a film that explores topics as diverse as interracial relationships during the 1950s and Government corruption and I can only concur that Norton is one of the best filmmakers Hollywood has right now.

Very few films have ever made me feel like I wanted to turn around and walk straight back into the cinema to watch it again – but that is exactly how Motherless Brooklyn made me feel. This is a beautiful suspense film that showcases some of Hollywood’s best acting talents while never losing its unique noir feeling.

 

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:

 

 

IMDB Rating:  Motherless Brooklyn (2019) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Motherless Brooklyn Reviews: N/A

Trailer:

 

 Stan today announced that after smashing viewing records worldwide, the gritty, unapologetic crime drama series Hightown has been officially picked up for a second season.

Hightown is set on idyllic Cape Cod, and follows one woman’s journey to sobriety, intertwined with an unfolding murder investigation. Jackie Quiñones (Monica RaymundChicago FireThe Good Wife), a hard-partying National Marine Fisheries Service agent, has her free-wheeling life thrown into disarray when she discovers a body on the beach – another casualty of Cape Cod’s opioid epidemic.

As a result of this trauma, Jackie takes the first steps toward becoming sober— until she becomes convinced that it’s up to her to solve the murder. Now at odds with Sergeant Ray Abruzzo (James Badge DaleOnly the Brave), an abrasive but effective member of the Cape Cod Interagency Narcotics Unit, Jackie starts to spiral. And she’s not alone. Ray, too, spins out of control; losing himself in the investigation. The lives of everyone connected to this murder crash and converge, reminding us just how complicated – and deadly – our addictions can be. Riley Voelkel (Roswell, New MexicoThe Originals), Shane Harper (Code BlackHappyland), Amaury Nolasco (Prison BreakDeception), Atkins Estimond (The ResidentLodge 49) and Dohn Norwood (MindhunterThe Sinner) also star.

Hightown is created and executive produced by Rebecca Cutter (Gotham) with Gary Lennon (PowerEuphoria) executive producing with Jerry Bruckheimer (Pirates of the Caribbean franchise, Top Gun: Maverick, The Amazing Race), Jonathan Littman (LuciferThe Amazing RaceCSI franchise) and KristieAnne Reed (LuciferL.A.’s Finest) from Jerry Bruckheimer TV; Ellen H. Schwartz also serves as executive producer. Oscar®-nominated cinematographer Rachel Morrison (Black Panther, Fruitvale Station) directed the first two episodes of the series.

Hightown was an Official Selection of the 2020 SXSW Film Festival.

Hightown is streaming now only on Stan, same day as the US, with new episodes weekly.

 

Stan today announced that the smash hit romantic comedy anthology series Love Life has been renewed for a second season and will be heading exclusively to Stan. Season one stars Oscar nominee Anna Kendrick, and its last four episodes premiered last night on Stan in Australia.

Season two will remain set in New York City but will focus on a new character’s journey – one which explores what happens when you’ve lived your whole life knowing who your soulmate is, only to find out years into a marriage that it’s not the right fit at all. The new season will also cleverly key off characters in season one, and “Darby” (Anna Kendrick) will appear.

“It’s been a labor of love working with everyone on Love Life and all who helped shaped Darby and brought her story to life. I am excited to be able to collaborate again with the team on a new character and their journey,” said executive producer and season one lead Anna Kendrick.

Love Life is produced by Lionsgate Television and Feigco Entertainment. The series comes from creator Sam Boyd (In a Relationship), who co-show runs with Bridget Bedard (Transparent, Ramy). Boyd and Bedard serve as executive producers alongside Anna KendrickPaul Feig (A Simple Favour, Bridesmaids) and Dan Magnante (Someone Great).

Love Life Season 2 will premiere only on Stan. All episodes of Season 1 are available to stream now in 4K.

 

Summary: A former superstar High School basketballer is asked to return years later to coach the team that are now perennial cellar dwellers. In order to be any use to the team though he must try to overcome his alcoholism.

Year: 2020

Australian Cinema Release Date: 5th March 2020

Thailand Cinema Release Date: TBA

Australian DVD Release Date: 30th May 2020

Country: United States

Director: Gavin O’Connor

Screenwriter: Brad Ingelsby

Cast: April Adams (Betty), Ben Affleck (Jack), Justice Alan (David), Tom Archdeacon (Ethan), John Aylward (Father Edward Devine), Yennifer Behrens (Sofia), Chris Bruno (Sal), Rachael Carpani (Diane), T.K. Carter (Russ), Nancy Linehan Charles (Anne), Da’Vinchi (Devon Childress), Nico David (Ryan), Marlene Forte (Gale), Janina Gavankar (Angela), Matthew Glave (Coach Lombardo), Ememia Golfieri (Sarah), Layla Golfieri (Sarah), Melvin Gregg (Marcus Parrish), Cynthia Rose Hall (Nancy), Chieko Hidaka (Haley), Ben Irving (Bobby Freeze), Dan Lauria (Gerry Norris), Charles Lott Jnr. (Chubbs Hendricks), Hayes MacArthur (Eric), Al Madrigal (Dan), Chad Mountain (Pat),  Edelyn Okano (Denise), Jeremy Radin (Father Mark Whelan), Jeremy Ratchford (Matty), Will Ropp (Kenny Dawes), Shay Roundtree (Ken), Todd Stashwick (Kurt), Jayne Taini (Susan Norris), Eric Tate (Sully), Glynn Turman (Doc), Fernando Luis Vega (Sam Garcia), Sal Velez Jnr. (Miguel), Michaela Watkins (Beth), Brandon Wilson (Brandon Durrett)

Running Time: 108 mins

Classification: M (Australia)

 

 

OUR THE WAY BACK REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths’ The Way Back Review:

The Way Back should have been a straight up slam dunk to be one of my favourite films of this year. It had so many things that I enjoy in its corner – there is the fact that I adore sports movies such as Varsity Blues and Coach Carter and then there is the Ben Affleck factor. Yes, I am a huge Affleck fan and have been ever since I fell in love with Kevin Smith’s movies way back in High School.

But there is something that majorly goes wrong with The Way Back and that thing made me feel like I was driving a sports car but unable to get out of second gear. The most disappointing thing about all of that though is it is an error that I feel could easily have been solved with a simple re-write of the script.

At the very heart of The Way Back is a film that could easily have been an Oscar winner. Affleck (Argo) plays Jack Cunningham a man whose life reads like a character from a Bruce Springsteen song. During High School he was a basketball phenomenon and it seemed like his history was written in the stars – he was going to be one of the greatest NBA players of all time. Flash-forward a couple of decades and Jack is now a faded man who works hard and drinks himself into oblivion every night.

Jack is given a shot at redemption though when the Headmaster at the Catholic school he attended, Father Devine (John Aylward – North Country,) contacts him and asks him to take over the coaching duties of the school’s basketball team – a team that now dwindles at the bottom of the league and is largely known as a laughing stock to the teams they play against. Despite a lot of hesitation Jack accepts the role and while the skills are still there so is his alcoholism and his resentment of the world that causes outbursts and chronic swearing that worries Father Mark Whelan (Jeremy Radin – Shark Week) who is charged with watching over the team and Jack.

The Way Back should have left me on the same emotional high that Coach Carter left me on years ago. The difference is that with Coach Carter the film was filled with inspiring speeches by Samuel L. Jackson while the writer gave us, the audience, an opportunity to get to know the kids on the team. They were all given characterisation and the result was we all cared about them.

With The Way Back we never get that opportunity. Yes we are introduced to characters like Marcus (Melvin Gregg – Snowfall) and Brandon (Brandon Wilson – Beyond The Lights) but we are never given an in-depth introduction into what makes them the way they are until it is much too late. The result is for the most part I just saw them as teenagers with a bad attitude who were wasting their God given talent.

I felt it was the same for Jack as a character as well. I am sure that screenwriter Brad Ingelsby (Run All Night) thought it was cute and artistic the way he kept the true story of Jack’s secret from the audience, but to me it felt like the major flaw of the film. Most of the time I was frustrated that Jack was passing up the great opportunities that life had given him in order to simply just get drunk each night. That frustration would have been eliminated if he had given us glimpses of the emotional issues that made Jack the way he was instead of holding those cards close to heart before finally springing them on the audience.

The one thing that does save The Way Back and makes it worth a second viewing is the acting performance of one Mr. Affleck. I am not just saying this as a devoted Affleck fan, but he is in Oscar winning form here. He is totally believable as a former sports star who has hit rock bottom and he delivers some truly emotional scenes that do have an effect on you as you are watching them. Many actors would struggle to deliver the pure emotion that he can generate in a scene on his own fuelled by drunken outbursts but his work here was enough to cause a tear to well up in my eyes more than once. Affleck of course knew why his character was the way he was… we sadly didn’t.

I really got the feeling throughout the film that with Affleck in this kind of form this film could have Oscar-winner written all over it if only a few minor re-writes had occurred in order to make me care more about some of the characters at hand. This is one I will certainly re-visit though just to see Affleck deliver a full lesson in character acting.

 

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:

 

 

IMDB Rating:  The Way Back (2020) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment The Way Back Reviews: N/A

Trailer:

Disney+ announced today that the popular scripted series, “Diary of a Future President” has been renewed for a second season.

From CBS Television Studios and I Can and I Will Productions, the show is executive produced by Gina Rodriguez along with creator Ilana Peña (“Crazy Ex-Girlfriend”), Keith Heisler and Molly Breeskin. Peña and Heisler are co-showrunners.

“Diary of a Future President” follows the adventures of Elena Cañero-Reed as she navigates the ups and downs of middle school on her journey to become the future president of the United States.

Series regulars include Tess Romero (“Blind Spot”) as Elena, Charlie Bushnell as Bobby, Selenis Leyva (“Orange Is the New Black,” “Murphy Brown”) as Gabi and Michael Weaver (“Here and Now,” “The Real O’Neals”) as Sam.

Rodriguez (“Jane the Virgin”) will return as adult Elena, the future president of the United States, in a recurring guest starring role.

“Optimistic, heartfelt stories that inspire are fundamental to our content and creator Ilana Peña’s series delivers on these attributes in spades,” says Agnes Chu, senior vice president, Content, Disney+.

“Families around the world have fallen in love with Elena and the Cañero-Reed family and we are thrilled to bring Elena’s often hilarious and always meaningful journey through adolescence back for another season. It has been wonderful to partner with the extraordinary Gina Rodriguez to champion specific, diverse points-of-view and we look forward to seeing even more of President Cañero-Reed in this next chapter.”

“We’re thrilled to partner with Disney+ on a series that showcases strong women both in front of, and behind the camera.  They’ve been incredible champions of the show from day one,” said David Stapf, president, CBS Television Studios.

“Gina’s ability to shepherd projects with new and diverse voices, combined with Ilana’s effortless blend of comedy and drama with humour and sensitivity bring this wonderful coming-of-age story to life.”

The series has received a 10-episode order and will stream exclusively on Disney+.