Tagged: Charlotte Rampling

Summary: 
Feature adaptation of Frank Herbert’s science fiction novel about the son of a noble family entrusted with the protection of the most valuable asset and most vital element in the galaxy.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates:  2nd December 2021 (Australia), 21st October 2021 (Thailand), 21st October 2021 (UK), 22nd October 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: USA, Canada

Director: Denis Villeneuve

Screenwriter: Jon Spaihts, Dennis Villeneuve, Eric Roth

Cast: Javier Bardem (Stilgar), Dave Bautista (Beast Rabban Harkonnen), Neil Bell (Sardaukar Bashar), Josh Brolin (Gurney Halleck), Timothee Chamalet (Paul Atreides), Chang Chen (Dr. Wellington Yueh), David Dastmalchian (Piter de Vries), Sharon Duncan-Brewster (Dr. Liet Kynes), Elmi Rashir Elmi (Shamir), Rebecca Ferguson (Lady Jessica Atreides), Stephn McKinley Henderson (Thufir Hawat), Oscar Isaac (Duke Leto Atreides), Jason Momoa (Duncan Idaho), Tachia Newall (Tanat), Babs Olusanmokun (Jamis), Charlotte Rampling (Reverend Mother Mohiam), Golda Rosheuvel (Shadout Mapes), Stellan Skarsgard (Baron Vladimir Harkonnen), Roger Yuan (Lietenant Lanville), Zendaya (Chani)

Running Time: 155 mins

Classification: M (Australia), 12A (UK), PG-13 (USA)

OUR DUNE REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Dune Review:

Dune has always felt really personal to me. I read the novel, by Frank Herbert, in my first year at High School and completely fell in love with it. I then made the mistake of watching the David Lynch film adaption, an adaption I loathed and Sting’s costume still haunts me to this day.

During my time at uni a friend suggested that I watch the mini-series and told me “that it was remarkably better than the film.” To her credit it was better but it never even went close to reaching the lofty expectations that I had in my head for what the world of Dune should look like since reading the novel.

So as you could imagine I was pretty nervous going in to watch the Denis Villeneuve (Blade Runner 2049) version. Actually perhaps nervous isn’t the right way to describe how I was feeling. To be honest I was trying not to feel excited because in the pit of my stomach I had a feeling that I was once again going to have hopes dashed. But, I am happy to say I was wrong, I was very wrong because Villeneuve has delivered a masterpiece.

For those who do not know the Dune story. It is told through the eyes of a young Duke-to-be, Paul Atreides (Timothee Chalamet – Lady Bird). He has watched his father, Duke Leto Atreides (Oscar Isaac – Ex Machina), build their family empire to make them one of the most respected families in the galaxy. With the likes of Gurney Halleck (Josh Brolin – Avengers: Endgame) and Duncan Idaho (Jason Momoa – Aquaman) training their Army they feel safe and secure.

Meanwhile both Gurney and Duncan train Paul in combat, in case there is ever a need for it, while his mother, Lady Jessica Atreides (Rebecca Ferguson – The Greatest Showman) trains him to saddle the special abilities that have been handed down to him through his family line. And while Paul attempts that those abilities are providing him of dreams and visions of Chani (Zendaya The Greatest Showman), a young native Fremen from the planet Arrakis.

Paul has no idea what the visions mean but is soon worried by them when he learns that the Atreides family have just been ordered to travel to Arrakis to bring peace to the planet and to stabilise and operate the ‘spice’ mining operation on the planet.

Villeneuve’s vision of Dune is nothing short of amazing. It is like he somehow went into my head and took my visions of what the Dune universe would look like and brought it to the screen. The first thing that hits you when watching Dune is the understanding of the themes and morals of the original novel that Villeneuve had the second is the fact that his film-making makes even the harshest scenes of the film look like a thing of beauty.

It was funny because when the credits were rolling after the screening the other night a stranger sitting next to me started to use a loud voice to say why he hated the film. I realised that every reason he said he hated the film was a reason why I loved it. He said he hated that it wasn’t like Star Wars – while I loved the fact that Villeneuve gave respect to the novel and didn’t decide to include cheesy ‘creatures’ or ridiculous one off lines.

The stranger said he didn’t like the fact that the film felt dark. Well of course it was dark, the themes explored in the film are not exactly something that you can make light. I was actually in awe of the way that the director kept a dark tone throughout the film without depressing his audience in a way that made the film a chore to watch. Talking of that the stranger also didn’t like that fact that he had to think during the film. Yes, he is right Villeneuve doesn’t spell out everything to the audience like they are dunces he makes you work at times to figure out what is happening and the result of that is you become so engrossed in the film itself that you feel like you are part of the universe alongside the characters at hand.

The power of this film really comes through the way that it looks on the big screen though. There is a dark, foreboding feeling that remains while the film throughout. Having said that though the film does reach epic heights that match the special moments of a film like Lord Of The Rings but there is an alternative feel to this film that allows for more character development then you would expect from a film of this magnitude, while Villeneuve never fails to remember one thing – at the heart of this film it is a coming-of-age story and even during epic battles etc the storyline of the film still remains a learning curve for Paul. I don’t say this very often about films that are supposed to be a spectacle or blockbuster. But this is truly a masterpiece and it shows that is okay to make a blockbuster film have an alternative edge to it. This is a film of true beauty and I cannot wait to revisit it again.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Average Subculture Rating:

Other Subculture Dune Reviews:

Nil

Trailer:

Oscar nominee Denis Villeneuve (“Arrival,” “Blade Runner 2049”) directs Warner Bros. Pictures and Legendary Pictures’ “Dune,” the big-screen adaptation of Frank Herbert’s seminal bestseller of the same name. A mythic and emotionally charged hero’s journey, “Dune” tells the story of Paul Atreides, a brilliant and gifted young man born into a great destiny beyond his understanding, who must travel to the most dangerous planet in the universe to ensure the future of his family and his people. As malevolent forces explode into conflict over the planet’s exclusive supply of the most precious resource in existence—a commodity capable of unlocking humanity’s greatest potential—only those who can conquer their fear will survive.

The film stars Oscar nominee Timothée Chalamet (“Call Me by Your Name,” “Little Women”), Rebecca Ferguson (“Stephen King’s Doctor Sleep,” “Mission: Impossible – Fallout”), Oscar Isaac (the “Star Wars” franchise) Oscar nominee Josh Brolin (“Milk,” “Avengers: Infinity War”), Stellan Skarsgård (HBO’s “Chernobyl,” “Avengers: Age of Ultron”), Dave Bautista (the “Guardians of the Galaxy” films, “Avengers: Endgame”), Stephen McKinley Henderson (“Fences,” “Lady Bird”), Zendaya (“Spider-Man: Homecoming,” HBO’s “Euphoria”), Chang Chen (“Mr. Long,” “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon”), David Dastmalchian (“Blade Runner 2049,” “The Dark Knight”), Sharon Duncan-Brewster (“Rogue One: A Star Wars Story,” Netflix’s “Sex Education”), with Oscar nominee Charlotte Rampling (“45 Years,” “Assassin’s Creed”), with Jason Momoa (“Aquaman,” HBO’s “Game of Thrones”), and Oscar winner Javier Bardem (“No Country for Old Men,” “Skyfall”).

Villeneuve directed “Dune” from a screenplay by Jon Spaihts and Villeneuve and Eric Roth based on the novel of the same name written by Frank Herbert. Villeneuve also produced the film with Mary Parent, Cale Boyter and Joe Caracciolo, Jr. The executive producers are Tanya Lapointe, Joshua Grode, Herbert W. Gains, Jon Spaihts, Thomas Tull, Brian Herbert, Byron Merritt and Kim Herbert. Behind the scenes, Villeneuve reteamed with two-time Oscar-nominated production designer Patrice Vermette (“Arrival,” “Sicario,” “The Young Victoria”), two-time Oscar-nominated editor Joe Walker (“Blade Runner 2049,” “Arrival,” “12 Years a Slave”), two-time Oscar-winning visual effects supervisor Paul Lambert (“First Man,” “Blade Runner 2049”), and Oscar-winning special effects supervisor Gerd Nefzer (“Blade Runner 2049”). He also collaborated for the first time with Oscar-nominated director of photography Greig Fraser (“Lion,” “Zero Dark Thirty,” “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story”); three-time Oscar-nominated costume designer Jacqueline West (“The Revenant,” “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button,” “Quills”) and co-costume designer Bob Morgan; and stunt coordinator Tom Struthers (“The Dark Knight” trilogy, “Inception”). Oscar-winning and multiple Oscar-nominated composer Hans Zimmer (“Blade Runner 2049,” “Inception,” “Gladiator,” “The Lion King”) is creating the score.

Warner Bros. Pictures and Legendary Pictures Present a Legendary Pictures Production, a Film by Denis Villeneuve, “Dune.” The film is slated to be released in Australian theaters beginning 2 December 2021

Oscar nominee Denis Villeneuve directs Warner Bros. Pictures and Legendary Pictures’ “Dune,” the big-screen adaptation of Frank Herbert’s seminal bestseller of the same name.

A mythic and emotionally charged hero’s journey, “Dune” tells the story of Paul Atreides, a brilliant and gifted young man born into a great destiny beyond his understanding, who must travel to the most dangerous planet in the universe to ensure the future of his family and his people. As malevolent forces explode into conflict over the planet’s exclusive supply of the most precious resource in existence—a commodity capable of unlocking humanity’s greatest potential—only those who can conquer their fear will survive.

DUNE stars Timothée Chalamet, Rebecca Ferguson, Oscar Isaac, Josh Brolin, Stellan Skarsgård, Dave Bautista, Stephen McKinley Henderson, Zendaya, Chang Chen, David Dastmalchian, Sharon Duncan-Brewster, Charlotte Rampling with Jason Momoa and Javier Bardem.

DUNE releases in Australia and New Zealand in cinemas on December 26, 2020.

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Logo

This week on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Dave, Greg and Nick take a look at new release films ‘45 Years,’ ‘Trumbo,’ ‘Concussion,’ ‘How To Be Single,’ ‘Risen’  and ‘Ride Along 2’. This episode also contains interviews with Tom Courtenay, Charlotte Rampling, Helen Mirren, Jay Roach, Will Smith, Dr. Bennett Omalu, Dakota Johnson, Rebel Wilson, Leslie Mann, Alison Brie, Joseph Fiennes, Kevin Hart, Ice Cube, Olivia Munn, Sarah Jayne (Made In Melbourne Film Festival), Tim Parrish (Transitions Film Festival), Michael Gosden (Watch The Sunset), Tristan Barr (Watch The Sunset) and Terri Nunn (Star Wars/Top Gun).

Also listen for your chance to win tickets to a special premiere screening of Triple 9 thanks to our good friends at Roadshow. Listen for the question that Dave G asks and then private message us the answer on either our Facebook or Twitter pages.

Triple 9 will be released on March 3 and stars Aaron Paul, Kate Winslet, Norman Reedus, Casey Affleck, Woody Harrelson, Chiwetel Ejifor, Gal Gadot, Teresa Palmer and Anthony Mackie.

To listen to the show or can download it for free from our Podcast Channel – Listen/Download here.

Academy Awards

The 2016 Oscar nominations have been announced. The big winner who have scored multiple nominations include The Revenant (12 nominations), Mad Max: Fury Road (10), The Martian (7), Bridge Of Spies (6), Carol (6), Spotlight (6), The Big Short (5), Star Wars: The Force Awakens (5), The Danish Girl (4), Room (4), Brooklyn (3), The Hateful Eight (3), Sicario (3), Ex Machina (2), Inside Out (2) and Steve Jobs (2).

And the nominations are:

 

BEST MOTION PICTURE OF THE YEAR

The Big Short

Brooklyn

Bridge Of Spies

Mad Max: Fury Road

The Martian

The Revenant

Room

Spotlight

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

Bryan Cranston (Trumbo)

Matt Damon (The Martian)

Leonardo DiCaprio (The Revenant)

Michael Fassbender (Steve Jobs)

Eddie Redmayne (The Danish Girl)

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

Cate Blanchett (Carol)

Brie Larson (Room)

Jennifer Lawrence (Joy)

Charlotte Rampling (45 Years)

Saoirse Ronan (Brooklyn)

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

Christian Bale (The Big Short)

Tom Hardy (The Revenant)

Mark Ruffalo (Spotlight)

Mark Rylance (Bridge Of Spies)

Sylvester Stallone (Creed)

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

Jennifer Jason Leigh (The Hateful Eight)

Rooney Mara (Carol)

Rachel McAdams (Spotlight)

Alicia Vikander (The Danish Girl)

Kate Winslet (Steve Jobs)

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN DIRECTING

Adam McKay (The Big Short)

George Miller (Mad Max: Fury Road)

Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu (The Revenant)

Lenny Abrahamson (Room)

Tom McCarthy (Spotlight)

BEST WRITING, SCREENPLAY WRITTEN DIRECTLY FOR SCREEN

Matt Charman, Ethan Coen, Joel Coen (Bridge Of Spies)

Alex Garland (Ex Machina)

Pete Docter, Meg Lefauve, Josh Cooley, Ronnie Del Carmen (Inside Out)

Josh Singer, Tom McCarthy (Spotlight)

Andrea Berloff, Jonathan Herman, S. Leigh Savidge, Alan Wenkus (Straight Outta Compton)

BEST WRITING, SCREENPLAY BASED ON MATERIAL PREVIOUSLY PRODUCED OR PUBLISHED

Charles Randolph, Adam McKay (The Big Short)

Nick Hornby (Brooklyn)

Phyllis Nagy (Carol)

Drew Goddard (The Martian)

Emma Donoghue (Room)

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE FILM OF THE YEAR

Anomalisa

O Menino e o Mudno

Inside Out

Shaun The Sheep Movie

Omoide no Mani

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM OF THE YEAR

El Abrazo De La Seripiente

Krigen

Mustang

Saul Fia

Theeb

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN CINEMATOGRAPHY

Edward Lachman (Carol)

Robert Richardson (The Hateful Eight)

John Seale (Mad Max: Fury Road)

Emmanuel Lubezki (The Revenant)

Roger Deakins (Sicario)

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN EDITING

Hank Corwin (The Big Short)

Margaret Sixel (Mad Max: Fury Road)

Stephen Mirrione (The Revenant)

Tom McArdle (Spotlight)

Maryann Brandon, Mark Jo Markey (Star Wars: The Force Awakens)

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN PRODUCTION DESIGN

Adam Stockhausen, Rena DeAngelo, Bernhard Henrich (Bridge of Spies)

Eve Stewart, Michael Standish (The Danish Girl)

Colin Gibson, Lisa Thompson (Mad Max: Fury Road)

Arthur Max, Celia Bobak (The Martian)

Jack Fisk, Hamish Purdy (The Revenant)

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN COSTUME DESIGN

Sandy Powell (Carol)

Sandy Powell (Cinderella)

Paco Delgado (The Danish Girl)

Jenny Beavan (Mad Max: Fury Road)

Jacqueline West (The Revenant)

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING

Love Larson, Eva Von Behr (Hundraaringem Som Klev Ut Genom Fonstret Och Forsvann)

Lesley Vanderwalt, Elka Wardega, Damian Martin (Mad Max: Fury Road)

Sian Grigg, Duncan Jarman, Robert A Pandini (The Revenant)

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN MUSIC WRITTEN FOR MOTION PICTURES, ORIGINAL SCORE

Thomas Newman (Bridge Of Spies)

Carter Burwell (Carol)

Ennio Morricone (The Hateful Eight)

Johann Johannsson (Sicario)

John Williams (Stars Wars: The Force Awakens)

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN MUSIC WRITTEN FOR MOTION PICTURES, ORIGINAL SONG

‘Earned It’ – The Weekend, Belly, Jason ‘DaHeala’ Quenneville, Stephan Moccio (Fifty Shades Of Grey)

‘Til It Happens To You’ – Diane Warren, Lady Gaga (The Hunting Ground)

‘Manta Ray’ – J. Ralph, Antony Hegarty (Racing Extinction)

‘Writing’s On The Wall’ – Sam Smith, James Napier (Spectre)

‘Simple Song #3’ – David Lang (Youth)

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN SOUND MIXING

Andy Nelson, Gary Rydstrom, Drew Kunin (Bridge Of Spies)

Chris Jenkins, Gregg Rudloff, Ben Osmo (Mad Max: Fury Road)

Paul Massey, Mark Taylor, Mac Ruth (The Martian)

Jon Taylor, Frank A. Montano, Randy Thom, Chris Duesterdiek (The Revenant)

Andy Nelson, Christopher Scarabosio, Stuart Wilson (Star Wars: The Force Awakens)

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN SOUND EDITING

Mark A. Mangini, David White (Mad Max: Fury Road)

Oliver Tarney (The Martian)

Martin Hernandez, Lon Bender (The Revenant)

Alan Robert Murray (Sicario)

Matthew Wood, David Acord (Star Wars: The Force Awakens)

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN VISUAL EFFECTS

Andrew Whitehurst, Paul Norris, Mark Williams Ardington, Sara Bennett (Ex Machina)

Andrew Jackson, Tom Wood, Dan Oliver, Andy Williams (Mad Max: Fury Road)

Richard Stammers, Anders Langland, Chris Lawrence, Steven Warner (The Martian)

Richard McBride, Matt Shumway, Jason Smith, Cameron Waldbauer (The Revenant)

Roger Guyett, Pat Tubach, Neal Scanlan, Chris Corbould (Stars Wars: The Force Awakens)

BEST DOCUMENTARY, FEATURE

Amy

Cartel Land

The Look Of Silence

What Happened, Miss Simone?

Winter On Fire

BEST DOCUMENTARY, SHORT SUBJECT

Body Team 12

War Within The Walls

Claude Lanzmann: Spectres Of The Shoah

A Girl In The River: The Price Of Forgiveness

Last Day Of Freedom

BEST SHORT FILM, ANIMATED

Historia de un oso

Mi ne mozhem zhit biz kosmosa

Prologue

Sanjay’s Super Team

World Of Tomorrow

BEST SHORT FILM, LIVE ACTION

Ave Maria

Day One

Alles Wird Gut

Shok

Stutterer

Young & Beautiful

Summary: Follows 17-year-old Isabelle (Marine Vacth), from a comfortable Parisian background, as she responds to her thoroughly disappointing first sexual experience by becoming a high-class online escort. Through the lurid liaisons that follow, she grows increasingly emboldened, setting the stage for an emotionally charged climax.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 1st May, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: France, German

Director: Francois Ozon

Screenwriter: Francois Ozon

Cast: Djedje Apali (Peter), Laurent Delbecque (Alex), Johan Leysen (Georges), Anne-Elina N’Diaye (Lucie), Nathan N’Diaye (Nicolas), Geraldine Pailhas (Sylvie), Frederic Pierrot (Patrick), Lucas Prisor (Felix), Charlotte Rampling (Alice), Fantin Ravat (Victor), Nathalie Richard (Vero), Jeanne Ruff (Claire), Akela Sari (Mouna), Marine Vacth (Isabelle)

Runtime: 95 mins

Classification: R18+

OUR YOUNG & BEAUTIFUL REVIEWS & RATINGS:

Greg KingYou can check out Greg’s Young & Beautiful review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #77

Stars(3.5)

Nick GardenerYou can check out Nick’s Young & Beautiful review on Southern FM

Stars(3.5)

David Griffiths:

The silver screen has always had a fascination with the age old profession of prostitution. Whether it be a comedic glance in the form of Pretty Woman or a grittier investigation as in the confronting Australian film The Jammed. Even the small screen has explored the career with Satisfaction and the Billie Piper led British series The Secret Life Of A Call Girl. Now comes Young & Beautiful, a film from French auteur Francois Ozon who has previously brought us films like Swimming Pool and 2012’s brilliant thriller In The House.

Young & Beautiful follows 17-year-old Isabelle (Marine Vacth – Ce que le jour doit a la nuit, My Piece Of The Pie) a privileged Parisian student who after losing her virginity while at her parent’s summer house embarks on a personal journey that see her turn to frequent hotel trysts to make extra cash.

However it is not all sex and money for young Isabelle who soon learns it is hard to keep her new life secret from her parents Sylvie (Geraldine Pailhas – Divin enfant, La rupture) and Patrick (Frederic Pierrot – The Film To Come, Populaire) and her sexually inquisitive younger brother Victor (Fantin Ravat – Crossed Hearts, La mort n’oubile personne). Then there are the problems such as clients not wanting to pay full price and a big problem she ultimately ends up facing with her best client, Georges (Johan Leysen – Obsessive Rhythms, Het Vonnis).

On the surface this may appear to be a film in which the director wants to titillate his audience with some young flesh in a film that’s sex scenes have eared the film a R18+ classification in Australia. That however isn’t the case, instead just like his last film, In The House, Francois Ozon makes this a character study that lets the audience join their own dots on why the central character acts the way she does. There’s no simple explanation to why Isabelle decides that a career in prostitution is for her. One moment she is a young girl losing her virginity, the next she is in a hotel room with a client. While Ozon doesn’t spell it out for his audience he does leave some bread crumbs for them to make their own conclusions.

While far from a thriller Ozon’s style of filmmaking bring an ever menacing feeling to many of the film’s scenes. There’s the present worry of what a client may do to the young and seemingly naive Isabelle, while she herself seems to threaten some mystery as her sexual journey seems to make her more resentful towards her family. There are certainly some scenes which leave wondering what the now sexually corrupted young girl is capable of doing with her brother or step-father.

Young & Beautiful certainly does deliver a new star of French cinema in the form of Marine Vacth who really announces herself as an actress prepared to deliver a sensual yet dramatic performance when faced with scenes that some actresses would turn away from. The film also features a neat cameo from Charlotte Rampling (The Sea, Night Train To Lisbon) that will impress serious cinephiles in the audience.

Young & Beautiful is a well written and beautifully acted drama that shows a completely different style of coming-of-age storytelling.

Stars(4)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3.5)

IMDB Rating:  Young & Beautiful (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Young & Beautiful′: Please check our full Young & Beautiful review that aired on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #77

Trailer:

Night Train To Lisbon

Summary: Raimund Gregorius is a Latin teacher from Berne. Encountering a book by the Portuguese poet and doctor Amadeu de Prado, he takes a train to Lisbon determined to find out more about the writer who appears to ask the very same questions that plague him: the purpose of human deeds and the unrealised potential of each and every life. His restless quest across Lisbon uncovers a contradictory portrait of a clever and brave yet conflicted man who lived at the time of Salazar’s dictatorship.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 5th December, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Germany, Switzerland, Portugal

Director: Bille August

Screenwriter: Greg Latter, Ulrich Hermann, Pascal Mercier (novel)

Cast: Helena Afonso (Maria Prado), Beatriz Batarda (Young Adriana), Nicolau Breyner (Da Silva), Sarah Buhlmann (Catarina Mendes), Tom Courtenay (Joao Eca), Marco D’Almeida (Young Joao), Dominique Devenport (Natalie), August Diehl (Young Jorge O’Kelly), Bruno Ganz (Jorge O’Kelly), Martina Gedeck (Mariana), Bomber Hurley-Smith (Young Bartolomeu), Jack Huston (Amadeu), Jeremy Irons (Raimund Gregorius), Burghart Klaubner (Judge Prado), Melanie Laurent (Young Estefania), Christopher Lee (Father Bartolomeu), Adriano Luz (Mendes), Hanspeter Muller (Mr. Kagi), Lena Olin (Estefania), Ana Lucia Palminha (Young Clotilde), Charlotte Rampling (Adriana de Prado), Jane Thorne (Coltilde), Filipe Vargas (Young Father Bartolomeu)

Runtime: 111 mins

Classification:M

OUR NIGHT TRAIN TO LISBON REVIEWS & RATINGS

Greg King: Stars(2.5)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘Cloudy With A Chance Of Meatballs 2’ that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(2.5)

IMDB Rating:  Night Train to Lisbon (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Night Train To Lisbon′: Please check our Night Train To Lisbon review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep 61.

Trailer: