Tagged: David Cross

Kung Fu Panda 3

Summary: Continuing his “legendary adventures of awesomeness”, Po must face two hugely epic, but different threats: one supernatural and the other a little closer to his home.

Year: 2016

Australian Cinema Release Date: 23rd March 2016

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA, China

Director: Alessandro Carloni, Jennifer Yuh Nelson

Screenwriter: Jonathan Aibel, Glenn Berger

Cast: Jack Black (Po (voice)), Jackie Chan (Monkey (voice)), Radzi Chinyanganya (Mi (voice)), Bryan Cranston (Li (voice)), David Cross (Crane (voice)), Barbara Dirickson (Grandma Panda (voice)), Steele Gagnon (Bao (voice)), Willie Geist (Dim (voice)), Dustin Hoffman (Shifu (voice)), April Hong (Mrs. Chow (voice)),  James Hong (Mr. Ping (voice)), Kate Hudson (Mei Mei (voice)), Angelina Jolie (Tigress (voice)), Knox Jolie-Pitt (Ku Ku (voice)), Pax Jolie-Pitt (Yoo (voice)), Shiloh Jolie-Pitt (Shuai Shuai (voice)), Zahara Jolie-Pitt (Meng Meng (voice)), Randall Duk Kim (Oogway (voice)), Liam Knight (Lei Lei (voice)), Wayne Knight (Big Fun/Hom-Lee (voice)), Lucy Liu (Viper (voice)), Seth Rogen (Mantis (voice)), Al Roker (Sum (voice)), Lindsey Russell (Peony (voice)), J.K. Simmons (Kai (voice)), Fred Tatasciore (Master Bear (voice)), Ming Tsai (Ming (voice)), Jean-Claude Van Damme (Mast Croc (voice))

Runtime: 95 mins

Classification: PG

 

OUR KUNG FU PANDA 3 REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

John Noonan:

Five years since he last skiddooed onto the scene, Po the Panda is back and this time, for fear of sounding like a movie poster, he’s bringing the whole family. Yes, a chance encounter at his adoptive father’s restaurant leads  Po (Jack Black) to meeting up with his long lost Dad, Li Shan (Bryan Cranston). Meanwhile, the vengeful spirit of a great warrior known as Kai (JK Simmons) has returned to the mortal realm and is seeking to steal Po’s chi.

This is the second sequel to DreamWorks’s 2008 hit and it’s amazing to see the difference between this and their previous flagship series, Shrek. By the time Shrek coughed and spluttered into his third sequel, the franchise was nothing more than weak storylines on which to pin dated pop culture references and Eel songs.

Conversely, Kung Fu Panda 3 allows Po and his pals to grow organically. Despite being declared Dragon Warrior in the previous film, there’s still much for the young panda to learn. Including it seems, that of how to be a panda. With his newly found father, Po ventures to their secret village in the hills to understand panda nature (tips include that they don’t do stairs and they don’t get up before midday) and potentially learn something that can defeat Kai.

Yes, this ‘just be yourself’ through line is a tried and tested formula, but it’s yet to feel derivate in the Panda universe. Po, despite his prowess, is a still a student. He has questions about his place in the universe that he hopes to answer. Meanwhile, there is only so many ways to you teach an ogre that’s okay to be an ogre, as long as you change yourself a bit.

Kung Fu Panda 3, as has become expected, is beautiful with traditional animation – admittedly done by computers – used for line drawn flashbacks. It’s a simple trick, but one that is used to great and emotional effect. Elsewhere the vocal talent is uniformly brilliant, with JK Simmons sounding like he’s channelling the angriest of angry John Goodmans, whilst James Hong steals every scene as Po’s adoptive father, Mr Ping; who doesn’t take kindly to others cutting his grass.

Rumours are that DreamWorks’s have at least another three chapters in the story of Po, and whilst that is a tempting offer, should they never surface, rest assured Kung Fu Panda 3 is a wonderful and joyous ending to a truly enjoyable series of films.

Stars(4)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(4)

 

IMDB Rating: Kung Fu Panda 3 (2016) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Kung Fu Panda 3 reviews: Nil

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SAG Awards

The 2013 SAG Awards nominations are now in. Here they are:

 

FEATURE FILMS

Outstanding Performance By A Male Actor In A Leading Role

  • Bruce Dern (Nebraska)
  • Chiwetel Ejiofor (12 Years A Slave)
  • Tom Hanks (Captain Phillips)
  • Matthew McConaughey (Dallas Buyers Club)
  • Forest Whitaker (Lee Daniels’ The Butler)

Outstanding Performance By A Female Actor In A Leading Role

  • Cate Blanchett (Blue Jasmine)
  • Sandra Bullock (Gravity)
  • Judi Dench (Philomena)
  • Meryl Streep (August: Osage County)
  • Emma Thompson (Saving Mr. Banks)

Outstanding Performance By A Male Actor In A Supporting Role

  • Barkhad Abdi (Captain Phillips)
  • Daniel Bruhl (Rush)
  • Michael Fassbender (12 Years A Slave)
  • James Gandolfini (Enough Said)
  • Jared Leto (Dallas Buyers Club)

Outstanding Performance By A Female Actor In A Supporting Role

  • Jennifer Lawrence (American Hustle)
  • Lupita Nyong’o (12 Years A Slave)
  • Julia Roberts (August: Osange County)
  • June Squibb (Nebraska)
  • Oprah Winfrey (Lee Daniels’ The Butler)

Outstanding Performance By A Cast In A Motion Picture

  • 12 Years A Slave – Bendict Cumberbatch, Paul Dano, Garrett Dillahunt, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Michael Fassbender, Paul Giamatti, Scoot McNairy, Lupita Nyong’o, Adepero Oduye, Sarah Paulson, Brad Pitt, Michael Kenneth Williams, Alfre Woodward
  • American Hustle – Amy Adams, Christian Bale, Louis C.K., Bradley Cooper, Paul Herman, Jack Huston, Jennifer Lawrence, Alessandro Nivola, Michael Pena, Jeremy Renner, Elisabeth Rohm, Shea Whigham
  • August: Osange County – Abigail Breslin, Chris Cooper, Benedict Cumberbatch, Juliette Lewis, Margo Martindale, Ewan McGregor, Dermot Mulroney, Julianne Nicholson, Julia Roberts, Sam Shepard, Meryl Streep, Misty Upham
  • Dallas Buyers Club – Jennifer Garner, Matthew McConaughey, Jared Leto, Denis O’Hare, Dallas Roberts, Steve Zahn
  • Lee Daniels’ The Butler – Mariah Carey, John Cusack, Jane Fonda, Cuba Gooding Jnr., Terrence Howard, Lenny Kravitz, James Marsden, David Oyelowo, Alex Pettyfer, Vanessa Redgrave, Alan Rickman, Liev Schreiber, Forest Whitaker, Robin Williams, Oprah Winfrey

 

TELEVISION PROGRAMS

Outstanding Performance By A Male Actor In A Television Movie or Mini-Series

  • Matt Damon (Behind The Candelabra)
  • Michael Douglas (Behind The Candelabra)
  • Jeremy Irons (The Hollow Crown)
  • Rob Lowe (Killing Kennedy)
  • Al Pacino (Phil Spector)

Outstanding Performance By A Female Actor In A Television Movie or Mini-Series

  • Angela Bassett (Betty & Coretta)
  • Helena Bonham Carter (Burton And Taylor)
  • Holly Hunter (Top Of The Lake)
  • Helen Mirren (Phil Spector)
  • Elisabeth Moss (Top Of The Lake)

Outstanding Performance By A Male Actor In A Drama Series

  • Steve Buscemi (Boardwalk Empire)
  • Bryan Cranston (Breaking Bad)
  • Jeff Daniels (The Newsroom)
  • Peter Dinklage (Game Of Thrones)
  • Kevin Spacey (House of Cards)

Outstanding Performance By A Female Actor In A Drama Series

  • Claire Danes (Homeland)
  • Anna Gunn (Breaking Bad)
  • Jessica Lange (American Horror Story: Coven)
  • Maggie Smith (Downton Abbey)
  • Kerrry Washington (Scandal)

Outstanding Performance By A Male Actor In A Comedy Series

  • Alec Baldwin (30 Rock)
  • Jason Bateman (Arrested Development)
  • Ty Burrell (Modern Family)
  • Don Cheadle (House Of Lies)
  • Jim Parsons (The Big Bang Theory)

Outstanding Performance By A Female Actor In A Comedy Series

  • Mayim Bialik (The Big Bang Theory)
  • Julie Bowen (Modern Family)
  • Edie Falco (Nurse Jackie)
  • Tina Fey (30 Rock)
  • Julia-Louis Dreyfus (Veep)

Outstanding Performance By An Ensemble In A Drama Series

  • Boardwalk Empire – Patricia Arquette, Margot Bignham, Steve Buscemi, Brian Geraghty, Stephen Graham, Erik La Ray Harvey, Jack Huston, Ron Livingstone, Domenick Lombardozzi, Gretchen Mol, Ben Rosenfield, Michael Stuhlbarg, Jacob Ware, Shea Whigham, Michael Kenneth Williams, Jeffrey Wright
  • Breaking Bad – Michael Bowen, Betsy Brandt, Bryan Cranston, Lavell Crawford, Tait Fletcher, Laura Fraser, Anna Gunn, Matthew T. Metzler, RJ Mitte, Dean Norris, Bob Odenkirk, Aaron Paul, Jesse Plemons, Steven Michael Quezada, Kevin Rankin, Patrick Sane
  • Downton Abbey – Hugh Bonneville, Laura Carmichael, Jim Carter, Brendan Coyle, Michelle Dockery, Kevin Doyle, Jessica Brown Findlay, Siobhan Finneran, Joanne Froggatt, Rob James-Collier, Allen Leach, Phyllis Logan, Elizabeth McGovern, Sophie McShera, Matt Milne, Lesley Nicol, Amy Nuttall, David Robb, Maggie Smith, Ed Speleers, Dan Stevens, Cara Theobold, Penelope Wilton
  • Game Of Thrones – Alfie Allen, John Bradley, Oona Chaplin, Gwendoline Christie, Emilia Clarke, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, Mackenzie Crook, Charles Dance, Joe Dempsie, Peter Dinklage, Natalie Dormer, Nathalie Emmanuel, Michelle Fairley, Jack Gleeson, Iain Glenn, Kit Harington, Lena Headey, Isaac Hempstead Wright, Kristofer Hivju, Paul Kaye, Sibel Kekilli, Rose Leslie, Richard Madden, Rory McCann, Michael McElhatton, Ian McElhinney, Philip McGinley, Hannah Murray, Iwan Rehon, Sophie Turner, Carice Van Houten, Maisie Williams
  • Homeland – F. Murray Abraham, Sarita Choudhury, Claire Danes, Rupert Friend, Tracy Letts, Damian Lewis, Mandy Patinkin, Morgan Saylor

Outstanding Performance By An Ensemble In A Comedy Series

  • 30Rock – Scott Adsit, Alec Baldwin, Katrina Bowden, Kevin Brown, Grizz Chapman, Tina Fey, Judah Friedlander, Jane Krakowski, John Lutz, James Marsden, Jack McBrayer, Tracey Morgan, Keith Powell
  • Arrested Development – Will Arnett, Jason Bateman, John Beard, Michael Cera, David Cross, Portia De Rossi, Isla Fisher, Tony Hale, Ron Howard, Liza Minnelli, Alia Shawkat, Jeffrey Tambor, Jessica Walter, Henry Winkler
  • The Big Bang Theory – Mayim Bialik, Kaley Cuoco, Johnny Galecki, Simon Helberg, Kunal Nayyar, Jim Parsons, Melissa Rauch
  • Modern Family – Julie Bowen, Ty Burrell, Aubrey Anderson Emmons, Jesse Tyler Ferguson, Nolan Gould, Sarah Hyland, Ed O’Neill, Rico Rodriguez, Eric Stonestreet, Sofia Vergara, Ariel Winter
  • Veep – Sufe Bradshaw, Anna Chlumsky, Gary Cole, Kevin Dunn, Tony Hale, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Reid Scott, Timothy Simons, Matt Walsh

 

STUNT ENSEMBLE HONORS

Outstanding Action Performance By A Stunt Ensemble In A Motion Picture

  • All Is Lost
  • Fast & Furious 6
  • Lone Survivor
  • Rush
  • The Wolverine

Outstanding Action Performance By A Stunt Ensemble In A Comedy or Drama Series

  • Boardwalk Empire
  • Breaking Bad
  • Game Of Thrones
  • Homeland
  • The Walking Dead

 

Kill Your Darlings

Summary:The year is 1944. Ginsberg (Radcliffe) is a young student at Columbia University when he falls hopelessly under the spell of charismatic classmate Carr (Dane DeHaan). Alongside Carr, Ginsberg manages to strike up friendships with aspiring writers William Burroughs (Ben Foster) and Jack Kerouac (Jack Huston) that would cast conformity to the wind, and serve as the foundation of the Beat movement. Meanwhile, an older outsider named David Krammerer falls deeply and madly in love with the impossibly cool Carr. Later, when Krammerer dies under mysterious circumstances, police arrest Kerouac, Burroughs, and Carr as potential suspects, paving the way for an investigation that would have a major impact on the lives of the three emerging artists.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 12th December, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: John Krokidas

Screenwriter: Austin Bunn, John Krokidas

Cast: Zach Appelman (Luke Detiweler), Michael Cavadias (Ray Conklin), David Cross (Louis Ginsberg), John Cullum (Professor Stevens), Erin Darke (Gwendolyn), Dane DeHaan (Lucien Carr), Jon DeVries (Mr. Burroughs), Ben Foster (William Burroughs), Michael C. Hall (David Kammerer), Jack Huston (Jack Kerouac), Jennifer Jason Leigh (Naomi Ginsberg), Leslie Meisel (Edith Cohen), Elizabeth Olsen (Edie Parker), Daniel Radcliffe (Allen Ginsberg), David Rasche (Dean), Kyra Sedgwick (Marian Carr), Kevyn Settle (Norman), Nicole Signore (Page)

Runtime: 103 mins

Classification:MA15+

OUR KILL YOUR DARLINGS REVIEWS & RATINGS

David Griffiths: 

There comes a time in each teenage film star’s career when they need to breakout of that mould and reveal themselves as an actor who can not only prove themselves as an adult actor but also somebody who is good enough to keep finding work for the next 30 to 50 years in the industry. Now is that time for Daniel Radcliffe who of course started his career as the boy wizard himself Harry Potter.

Now Harry’s put his wand back in the cupboard Radcliffe needs to show that he can play other characters and to the young stars’ credit he has tackled some ambitious projects. Firstly there was the stage nudity as he took the lead role in the theatre production of “Equus” and then he delved into Gothic Horror with “The Woman In Black.” Now in his latest feature film role Radcliffe finds himself entwined in a tale of homosexuality and murder as he portrays one of America’s greatest literature figures in “Kill Your Darlings.”

Radcliffe plays poet Allen Ginsberg at a time in his life when his famous father Louis Ginsberg (David Cross) watches as his son goes off to college at Columbia and his mother Naomi (Jennifer Jason Leigh) is admitted into a mental institution.

Allen’s arrival at Columbia opens his eyes up to a new world of literature, the forbidden fruit of people such as Harry Miller. He finds himself fascinated and intrigued by fellow student Lucien Carr (Dane DeHaan) whose charm, wit and boyish good looks makes him the kind of person that anyone will do anything for… something that ultimately brings about his downfall.

Soon Allen finds himself joining Lucien’s call for destroying the popular literature of the day and replacing it with the risqué and throwing all literature rules out the window. Together they team up with Jack Kerouac (Jack Huston) and William Burroughs (Ben Foster) to begin the revolution. But soon the band of talented young writers find themselves involved in a murder that threatens to end their promising careers before they have even started.

As a film “Kill Your Darlings” delivers a story of intrigue that certainly draws in its audience but you are left feeling like director John Krokidas (who is a first time feature film director) needed to push this film a little further. It’s a gritty and dirty story but Krokidas seems to just skirt around the edges. Sure there is heavy drug use and Radcliffe partakes in several scenes of homosexual passion and sex but the storyline at hand here really called for Krokidas to push the envelope a little further. The full answers about Lucien and David’s (Michael C. Hall) relationship seems cloudy. Was Lucien just a gifted player who knew how to get what he wanted or was David the sexual predator that Lucien and his mother suggested he was. Then of course there’s the other big question that gets thrown up but never really answered, why did Allen tell David where Lucien was when he knew the young boy was trying to escape him. The fact that these questions are never answered ends up with “Kill Your Darlings” becoming a good-rather-than-great film.

The power of this film though lays in the characterisation and the way those characters are portrayed by the actors involved. Radcliffe portrays the naive and often confused Ginsberg quite well. Archival footage shows that Radcliffe captured a lot of Ginsberg’s awkward facial expressions extremely well and the young actor can certainly hold his head up high as he does more than enough to suggest that he has a lengthy career ahead of him. As previously mentioned Radcliffe does deliver some risqué scenes but just imagine what could have been if Krokidas had decided to take this film a little further.

Krokidas has also surrounded Radcliffe with some fine acting talent. Jack Huston delivers a strong performance as he shows Jack Kerouac in a very different light to the way he was portrayed in “On The Road” while Ben Foster is haunting and virtually unrecognisable as he delves deeply into some character acting while he plays William Burroughs.

The standout actor here though is Dane DeHaan whose roles in films such as “Lawless,” “Chronicle” and “Metallica’s Through The Never” have been promising, but here he delivers. DeHaan seems to call on the skills of a young Leonardo DiCaprio as he shines in a role that will certainly be deemed his breakout role in the years to come. His performance is strong throughout and he often steals scenes away from his much more experienced co-stars.

Like “Howl” and “On The Road” before it “Kill Your Darlings” is an interesting insight to the tragic and somewhat strange lives of some of America’s most famous literacy giants, and while the film is a great watch it will always be a film that leaves you wondering what could have been if the director had the courage to go that little bit further.

Stars(3.5)

Greg King: Stars(2.5)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘Kill Your Darlings’ that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3)

IMDB Rating:  Kill Your Darlings (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Kill Your Darlings′: Please check our Kill Your Darlings review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep 62.

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