Tagged: Dylan Arnold

Summary: 
The saga of Michael Myers and Laurie Strode continues in the next thrilling chapter of the Halloween series.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates:  28th October 2021 (Australia), 11th November 2021 (Thailand), 15th October 2021 (UK), 15th October 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: USA, UK

Director: David Gordon Green

Screenwriter: David Gordon Green, Danny McBride, Scott Teems

Cast: Airon Armstrong (The Shape – 1978), Dylan Arnold (Cameron Elam), Ross Bacon (Tivoli), Charlie Benton (Officer Richards), Haluk Bilginer (Dr. Ranbir Sartain), Nick Castle (The Shape), Lenny Clarke (Phil), Salem Collins (Christy), James Jude Courtney (The Shape), Jim Cummings (Pete McCabe), Jamie Lee Curtis (Laurie Strode), Charles Cyphers (Leigh Brackett), Omar J. Dorsey (Sherriff Baker), Brian F. Durkin (Deputy Graham), Judy Greer (Karen), Anthony Michael Hall (Tommy Doyle), Robert Lee Harvey (Tom F.F. Bentley), Tanya Jacobson (Tanya Jacobson), Tom Jones Jr. (Dr. Samuel Loomis), Jacob Keohane (Deputy Tobias), Nacy Kyes (Annie Brackett), Ryan Lewis (Deputy Sullivan), Robert Longstreet (Lonnie Elam), Scott MacArthur (Big John), Colin Mahan (Dr. Samuel Loomis (voice)), Thomas Mann (Young Hawkins), Andi Matichak (Allyson), Brian Mays (Brian The Bartender), Michael McDonald (Little John), Carmela McNeal (Vanessa), Tony Moran (Michael Myers), Jibrail Nantambu (Julian), Bob Odenkirk (Bob), Christian Michael Pates (Young Michael Myers), Will Patton (Officer Hawkins), Kyle Richards (Lindsay), Drew Schneid (Oscar), Michael Smallwood (Marcus), P.J. Soles (Lynda), Nancy Stephens (Marion), Diva Taylor (Sondra), J. Gaven Wilde (Dennis), Giselle Witt (Mindy)

Running Time: 105 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia), 18 (UK), R (USA)

OUR HALLOWEEN KILLS REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Halloween Kills Review:

Why would anyone want to make a movie that fits into the universe of a timeless classic? I’ve thought about that a lot over the years, and even after hearing the excitement in producer Jason Blum’s voice when I interviewed him about the last Halloween film didn’t make it any clearer for me. Sure I get that excitement stemmed from the fact that Blum had always dreamt of making a Halloween but part of him must of wondered whether or not it would be worth the comments from the haters out there who were only too ready to troll once the film was released.

To Blum and director David Gordon Green’s (Stronger) credit the first film is this trilogy was probably the best Halloween film since Halloween H20 and it introduced the fan-base to a more modern and brutal take that was certainly not the re-make that so many haters out there were expecting.

Now comes the difficult second child in the trilogy and it is a bit of a double-edged sword. While Green ups and the violence and gore this time around to make it one of the most graphic and gruesome Halloween films it does suffer from what I call ‘second-film syndrome’ in that the ending of the film is so focussed on setting up things for the third film that it seems to forget that audiences deserve something decent to finish things this time around.

Halloween Kills starts where its predecessor ends. Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis – True Lies), her daughter Karen (Judy Greer – Ant-Man) and her grand-daughter Allyson (Andi Matichak – Orange Is The New Black) are being treated in hospital after luring Michael Myers into his fiery trap, however the trap failed and after Myers battles with the first responders he heads into town once again looking for his nemesis.

In town though everything has gone crazy. While Officer Hawkins (Will Patton – Armageddon) tries to not only hunt down Myers and restore calm to the town a group of vigilantes led by Tommy Doyle (Anthony Michael Hall – The Dark Knight) have decided that enough is enough and that the only way to end Myer’s murderous rampage is with some old-fashioned mob justice. The result is a catastrophic turn of events where nobody is safe.

There were so many things about Halloween Kills that I loved. Michael vs The First Responders is a classic Halloween moment that is going to be long remembered by fans of the series – it also may well be David Gordon Green’s legacy stamp on the franchise. I also loved the fact that instead of just introducing random characters that nobody has ever seen, or care about, into the battle with Michael that Green has gone back and chosen characters that have appeared in the franchise in the past to re-appear. That not only shows Green’s love of the material that his expanding on but also adds something a little special for true fans of the franchise.

That decision actually results in one of most memorable moments of the entire franchise as actor Anthony Michael Hall steals the show as Tommy Doyle. Hall’s performance mirrors what the town is going through – the anger, the determination and the hope that they can finally be rid of Michael once and for all. His performance here is something that Hall should be incredibly proud of.

I also loved the fact that the events of the film seem to mirror what has happened in recent American history. The vigilante group looking for justice and the mass panic at the hospital seemed to be ripped straight out of newspapers with what happened with the storming of the Capitol Building and some of the recent riots in the US. It is moments like that that make you realise that Green has been very capable with bringing this franchise into the modern day and you can’t help but wonder if he wasn’t making a sneaky comment about modern day American society with some of the scenes depicted throughout the film.

What I didn’t like though, aside from the limp ending, was that it felt like the film wasted the talents of Jamie Lee Curtis. While it would have been unbelievable to have her fit and spry after the events of the last film it did feel like she was wasted being bed-ridden for a majority of the film. At least if the believability of the film did need her in hospital then perhaps the film could have used the fact that she is a sitting, wounded duck waiting for the hunter better as a suspense mechanism.

Overall though Halloween Kills does work as a film though. There are some truly memorable scenes in the film that will be forever etched into horror folklore while the creative kills and extra gore make sure the film is above many of the sub-standard horror films out there on the market. Now all I can say is bring on the finale.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

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Summary: Tessa and Hardin continue to have ups and downs in their relationship as Tessa settles into a job she loves and Hardin tries to get his life together.

Year: 2020

Cinema Release Dates: 10th September (Australia), 4th September 2020 (UK), 23rd October 2020 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Roger Kumble

Screenwriter: Mario Celaya, Anna Todd

Cast: Dylan Arnold (Noah), Stuart Berehns (Ron), Selma Blair (Carol), Feng Chao (Kevin), Taylor Conrod (Paige), Vanessa Dubasso (Ally), Rob Estes (King), John Jackson Hunter (Young Hardin), Candice King (Kimberley), Josephine Langford (Tessa), Samuel Larsen (Zed), Louise Lombard (Trish), Shane Paul McGhie (Landon), Pia Mia (Tristan), Constance Payne (Zoe), Max Ragone (Smith), Sarah Rossman (Nadia), Innana Sarkis (Molly), John W. Sparks (Santa Claus), Dylan Sprouse (Trevor), Khadijha Red Thunder (Steph), Hero Fiennes Tiffin (Hardin), Charlie Weber (Christian Vance), Karimah Westbrook (Karen), Ariel Yasmine (Jamie)

Running Time: 105 mins

Classification: M (Australia), 15 (UK), R (USA)

OUR AFTER WE COLLIDED REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ After We Collided Review:

Have sex. Have a fight. Have sex again. Fight again. There you go, I have pretty much saved you from having to waste 100 minutes of your life on After We Collided because that is the sequence of events that play out on repeat all throughout the movie.

That might sound harsh, but I am sorry this film really deserves it because even shows like Dawson’s Creek and One Tree Hill never had as much teenage angst as this film manages to deliver to the screen. Of course I probably should never have expected more – the first film in this franchise, simply titled After, was a blatant rip-off of Cruel Intentions which of course in itself was a teenage remake of Dangerous Liaisons which in turn was a remake of a French film (lost yet???) – the difference being that Cruel Intentions is one of my favourite teenage movies of all time while After is something that I hope I never have to endure again.

Instead of distancing itself from the C.I. comparison part of the ‘improvements’ that the studio brought to the table for After We Collided was bringing on board Roger Kumble to direct… who of course was the man who directed the Cruel Intentions movie, its sequel and subsequent television show. I really don’t know what to say other than – they really didn’t think that through, did they?

Really, the only change I noticed this time around was that Kumble has given the film a more adult edge. Now the two young lovers – Tessa (Josephine Langford – Intro The Dark) and Hardin (Hero Fiennes Tiffin – Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince) – use adult cuss words and have sex… a lot. The script is still bad, Hero Fiennes Tiffin still isn’t believable as a bad boy and as a result the movie suffers on all levels just as its predecessor did.

Plot-wise the movie picks up just a month after the grand finale of the first film which saw Tessa learn that Hardin only slept with her as part of a bet to take her virginity and no matter how often he declares it she doesn’t believe he loves her. Now Hardin is still heart-broken and deals with his pain by getting tattoo while sober (yep the screenwriter wants you to believe that’s what bad boys do) while Tessa is moving on with her life and becoming an intern at a publishing company… wait isn’t that just Fifty Shades Of Grey without the whips and chains???

From there it feels like the movie is on repeat. Tessa’s mother still don’t like Hardin, they reconcile, they have sex, they fight, they reconcile, they have sex again… and yes it seriously happens four or five time throughout the film. Oh and we finally see Hardin’s mother – played by Louise Lombard (CSI) – and she likes Tessa. Did I mention that Tessa and Hardin have sex a lot and anywhere they like – in bed, in the shower, at her work, in other people’s beds… like I said anywhere they want.

To say nothing much happens in the film is an understatement and it felt wherever I looked I just saw other movies that the film ‘borrowed’ from. This time around Hardin’s wardrobe is the same as Sebastian’s in Cruel Intentions and Hero Fiennes Tiffin just does not work as a bad guy no matter how the screenwriters try to change that.

Bringing Roger Kumble on board should have made After We Collided a better film but suddenly nothing was ever going to save this bomb. Josephine Langford puts in a good acting performance but is badly let down by a screenplay that goes nowhere – the result is badly written film with so many sex scenes it feels like you are watching soft-core porn. Check my worst films list of 2020 and you can guarantee that this will be on it.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

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IMDB Rating:

After We Collided (2020) on IMDb

Other Subculture After We Collided Reviews:

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