Tagged: Golshifteh Farahani

Paterson

Summary: A quiet observation of the triumphs and defeats of daily life, along with the poetry evident in its smallest details.

Year: 2016

Australian Cinema Release Date: 22nd December 2016

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States, Germany, France

Director: Jim Jarmusch

Screenwriter: Jim Jarmusch

Cast: Adam Driver (Paterson), Golshifteh Farahani (Laura), Chasten Harmon (Marie), William Jackson Harper (Everitt), Frank Harts (Luis), Barry Shabaka Henley (Doc), Rizwan Manji (Donny), Brian McCarthy (Jimmy), Method Man (himself), Nellie (Marvin), Trevor Parham (Sam), Troy T. Parham (Dave)

Runtime: 118 mins

Classification: M

OUR PATERSON REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

 

Film director Jim Jarmusch’s work isn’t everybody’s cup of tea. His films are often described by the average cinema goer as ‘hard to get’ and you can always guarantee that his films are going to make you think. His last film, Only Lovers Left Alive, may have been a vampire movie… but even that was a flick with a difference. Now comes one of Jarmusch’s most cinema-friendly films, Paterson… but even this is going to have to you thinking deeply long after you leave the cinema.

Paterson tells a simple tale. It follows the lives of Paterson (Adam Driver – Star Wars: The Force Awakens), a poet who spends his days working as a bus driver, and his partner Laura (Golshifteh Farahani – Body Of Lies) who dreams drift from being a cup-cake mogul to starting a country music career. Ironically they live in Paterson, New Jersey and for the most part, the film follows Paterson’s regular day of going to work, listening to his passenger’s conversations, writing poetry, walking his dog and visiting his local bar.

As you can ascertain from the film’s synopsis Paterson is one of those films where very little happens plot-wise yet while you are watching the movie you never find yourself getting bored. Jarmusch is a talented enough storyteller to know that you can get away with very little plot if you fill your film with enough interesting characters to hold your audience’s interest. Here, Jarmusch does that in bucket loads. While his life may be a little boring Paterson himself is a character that you find yourself rooting for because he is such a nice character and completely unaware of what a great poet he is.

The secondary source of interest for the audience in Paterson is the interesting characters that Jarmusch chooses to have interact with Paterson. Whether it be passengers such as two men who know nothing about women, teenage anarchists or those that chat to Paterson in his local bar – a barman obsessed with celebrities who lived in Paterson, Doc (Barry Shabaka Henley – Collateral) or Everett (William Jackson Harper – True Story) and Marie (Chasten Harmon – Elementary) a young couple in disarray, these characters each bring something unique to the story at hand.

Part of what makes Paterson such an interesting film is you never really know what Jarmusch is setting his audience up for. Is he planning on giving Paterson that one moment when he meets the right person who can help launch his career as a poet or even deliver the time when he finally realises that he does, in fact, have a talent that the world deserves to hear. Then, of course, the darker side of your imagination wonders whether or not Jarmusch is planning on putting his characters through something traumatic that will change their lives forever.

Jarmusch’s writing also allows for some decent performances from his leads. Fans of Adam Driver will quickly tell you that he is capable of more than what we saw in his recent performance in The Force Awakens. Serious movie fans will know that over the years Driver has delivered some powerful performances in serious films like What If, Midnight Special and Inside Llewyn Davis, and once again he delivers the goods here as he portrays the very melancholy Paterson. This film also introduces most fans to a bright, new star in Golshifteh Farahani. This fresh face shows pure talent as she plays the free-spirited Laura and you get a real feeling that she is somebody that we are going to see a lot of in the near future.

If you go into Paterson expecting a high-octane film, then you will be sorely disappointed. Instead, once again Jim Jarmusch has created an interesting film that is largely a character study of two everyday people. This is a film that will have you debating what Jarmusch is trying to say with the film and will also have you seeing Adam Driver as a potential Oscar nominee.

Stars(3)

 

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3)

 

IMDB Rating:  Paterson (2016) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Paterson Reviews: Nil

Trailer:

Captain Jack Sparrow

Production has commenced on location in Australia on Disney and Jerry Bruckheimer Films’ epic comedy adventure “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales,” directed by Espen Sandberg & Joachim Rønning (“Kon-Tiki”), the fifth entry in the blockbuster franchise inspired by the classic Disney Theme Parks attraction, which has reaped $3.7 billion in worldwide box office. “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales” will film entirely at Village Roadshow Studios and on locations within Queensland, Australia.

Johnny Depp returns to his iconic, Academy Award®-nominated role of Captain Jack Sparrow, one of the most beloved characters in motion picture history, newly joined by Oscar® winner Javier Bardem (“No Country for Old Men,” “Skyfall”), rising young stars Kaya Scodelario (“The Maze Runner,” British television’s “Skins”) and Brenton Thwaites (“Maleficent,” “The Giver”) and Golshifteh Farahani (“The Patience Stone,” “Exodus: Gods and Kings”). Rejoining the action are Academy Award winner Geoffrey Rush as Barbossa, Kevin R. McNally as Joshamee Gibbs and Stephen Graham as Scrum.

Thrust into an all-new adventure, a down-on-his-luck Captain Jack Sparrow finds the winds of ill-fortune blowing even more strongly when deadly ghost pirates led by his old nemesis, the terrifying Captain Salazar (Bardem), escape from the Devil’s Triangle, determined to kill every pirate at sea…including him.  Captain Jack’s only hope of survival lies in seeking out the legendary Trident of Poseidon, a powerful artifact that bestows upon its possessor total control over the seas

“Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales” is produced by Jerry Bruckheimer and written by Jeff Nathanson (“Catch Me If You Can,” “Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull”). The executive producers are Chad Oman, Joe Caracciolo, Jr. and Brigham Taylor.

Joining Bruckheimer, Sandberg & Rønning for the swashbuckling new voyage is a first-tier group of award-winning behind-the-scenes artists—many of them new to the “Pirates of the Caribbean” family—including director of photography Paul Cameron (“Gone in Sixty Seconds,” “Déjà Vu,” “Collateral”), production designer Nigel Phelps (“Pearl Harbor,” “Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen, “Transformers: Dark of the Moon,” “World War Z”), costume designer Penny Rose (all four “Pirates of the Caribbean” films), visual effects supervisor Gary Brozenich (“The Lone Ranger,” “Edge of Tomorrow”), Oscar®-winning special effects production consultant John Frazier (nine Jerry Bruckheimer films and dozens of others) and special effects supervisor Dan Oliver (“Mad Max: Fury Road,” “X-Men Origins: Wolverine”), supervising stunt coordinator R.A. Rondell (“The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1”) and stunt coordinators Thomas Robinson Harper (“Guardians of the Galaxy,” “Captain America: The Winter Soldier”) and Kyle Gardiner (“San Andreas,” “Kingsman: The Secret Service”), Academy Award®-winning makeup and hair designer Peter Swords King (“The Lord of the Rings” and “The Hobbit” trilogies, “Into the Woods”) and film editors Joel Cox ( “Unforgiven,” “Million Dollar Baby,” “American Sniper”) and Gary D. Roach (“American Sniper”).

The exciting filmmaking team of Sandberg & Rønning directed “Kon-Tiki,” the critically acclaimed story of famed explorer Thor Heyerdahl, which was nominated for both an Academy Award® and a Golden Globe Award® for Best Foreign Language Film from their native Norway. Following their work as award-winning commercial and music video directors, Rønning and Sandberg directed the World War II action drama “Max Manus: Man of War” before taking on “Kon-Tiki.” Most recently Rønning and Sandberg served as executive producers and directed the first two episodes of Netflix’s big-scale mini-series “Marco Polo,” which they filmed on exotic locations in Malaysia, Kazakhstan and Venice. A second season was recently announced for “Marco Polo,” with Rønning and Sandberg continuing on as executive producers.

First in partnership with Don Simpson, and then as the chief of Jerry Bruckheimer Films, Bruckheimer has produced an unprecedented string of worldwide smashes, impacting not only the motion picture and television industries, but mass culture as well. His film and television productions have been honored with numerous awards and nominations, including six Academy Awards®. In addition to his prolific television credits, Bruckheimer’s films include “Top Gun,” “Beverly Hills Cop,” “American Gigolo,” “Flashdance,” “Bad Boys,” “The Rock,” “Armageddon,” “Remember the Titans,” “Pearl Harbor,” “Black Hawk Down,” “National Treasure,” “Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time,” “The Lone Ranger” and “Deliver Us From Evil.” He is the producer of all four previous “Pirates of the Caribbean” films.

My Sweet Pepper Land

Summary: Baran is a hero. Or was – ever since Saddam fell, the Kurdish army has fallen apart. Becoming police chief in a remote border town, he is determined to bring order to the place and stand up to outlaw leader Aziz’s self-imposed ‘justice’. But when he meets defiantly independent schoolteacher Govend he not only finds something to fight for, but also something that may destroy him whole.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 22nd May, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: France, Germany, Iraq

Director: Hiner Saleem

Screenwriter: Hiner Saleem, Antoine Lacomblez

Cast: Tarik Akreyi (Aziz Aga), Korkmaz Arslan (Baran), Mir Murad Bedirxan (Tajdin), Feyyax Duman (Jaffar), Golshifteh Farahani (Govend), Suat Usta (Reber), Veronique Wuthrich (Niroj)

Runtime: 90 mins

Classification: M

OUR MY SWEET PEPPER LAND REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Greg King: You can check out Greg’s My Sweet Pepper Land review on www.filmreviews,net.au

Stars(3)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3)

 

IMDB Rating:  My Sweet Pepper Land (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘My Sweet Pepper Land′: For our full My Sweet Pepper Land review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #80

Trailer:

The Missing Picture

Sharmill Films is proud to announce The Missing Picture, winner of the prestigious Un Certain Regard top prize among its four acquisitions from the 2013 Cannes Film Festival.

The acclaimed autobiographical documentary by French-Cambodian director Rithy Panh uses clay animated figures to tell Panh’s recollection of the tragic events which lead to the deaths of his family, with first person narration by the filmmaker. Geoff Andrew in Sight & Sound praised the film as being “moving and remarkably resonant.”

Cannes Jury Prize winner Thomas Vinterberg presided over the announcement of the Un Certain Regard top prize, commenting:

“One of the finest achievements in filmmaking is to create unforgettable moments – moments that stay with us – as a collective memory – as a collective mirror of our existence…This selection was political, highly original, sometimes disturbing, diverse and first of all, very often – unforgettable.”

Vinterberg presented Rithy Panh with his prize, while Panh gave gratitude to the jury and all involved with the festival, as well as to cinemaphiles for supporting film. (The Hollywood Reporter)

The sole female director with a film nominated for the Palme d’Or in Cannes this year, Valeria Bruni Tedeschi draws inspiration from Anton Chekhov’s “The Cherry Orchard” for her third and semi-autobiographical feature,

A Castle in Italy. Bruni Tedeschi stars as Louise, an actress in her early forties who has retired from the screen, but when her aging mother (played by Marisa Borini, Valeria’s Bruni Tedeschi’s mother in real life) can no longer afford to keep their Piermonte estate, the family is faced with the end of an era and an uncertain future. Working with her frequent collaborators on the screenplay, Tedeschi’s writing and direction has been praised as “inspired” as she “holds all of the film’s myriad tangents in a delicate balance” (Variety)

Also entered for the Un Certain Regard prize in Cannes was My Sweet Pepper Land by Hiner Saleem, one of the top filmmakers in Kurdish cinema, who successfully combines humour and hope for the future of his people in his new film set on the Iraqi/Turkish border. Featuring “a luminous performance” by Iranian actress Golshifteh Farahani (The Hollywood Reporter), My Sweet Pepper Land is a quirky ‘Wild West’ inspired drama in which war hero Baran (Korkmaz Arslan) finds himself at odds with his job as police chief in the capital city in peacetime.

In Cannes Sharmill Films acquired another alternate content title, the new documentary Reaching for the Stars about the English/Irish pop phenomenon One Direction.

Sharmill Films Director Natalie Miller AO said that it was “a very successful Cannes this year, not only for our company but we will have many good films to look forward to in the art house market.”