Tagged: Jason Schwartzman

Summary: 
A love letter to journalists set in an outpost of an American newspaper in a fictional twentieth century French city that brings to life a collection of stories published in “The French Dispatch Magazine”.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates:  9th December 2021 (Australia), 22nd October 2021 (UK), 22nd October 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: USA, Germany

Director: Wes Anderson

Screenwriter: Wes Anderson

Cast: Mathieu Amalric (The Commissaire), Nicolas Avinee (Vittel), Bob Balaban (Uncle Nick), Mohamed Belhadjine (Mitch-Mitch), Adrien Brody (Julian Cadazio), Timothee Chalamet (Zeffirelli), Mauricette Coudivat (Maman), Willem Dafoe (Albert The Abacus), Cecile de France (Mrs B), Benicio del Toro (Moses Rosenthaler), Guillaume Gallienne (Mr. B), Winston Ait Hellal (Gigi), Tom Hudson (Mitch-Mitch (on stage)), Anjelica Huston (Narrator (voice)), Lyna Khoudri (Juliette), Alex Lawther (Morisot), Frances McDormand (Lucinda Krementz), Elisabeth Moss (Alumna), Bill Murray (Arthur Howitzer Jr.), Edward Norton (The Chauffeur), Steve Park (Nescaffier), Rodolphe Pauly (Patrolman Maupassant), Tony Revolori (Young Rosenthaler), Saoirse Ronan (Junkie/Showgirl #1), Jason Schwartzman (Hermes Jones), Lea Seydoux (Simone), Lois Smith (Upshur ‘Maw’ Clampette), Tilda Swinton (J.K.L. Berensen), Christoph Waltz (Paul Duval), Owen Wilson (Herbsaint Sazerac), Henry Winkler (Uncle Joe), Jeffrey Wright (Roebuck Wright)

Running Time: 107 mins

Classification: M (Australia), 15 (UK), R (USA)

OUR THE FRENCH DISPATCH REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ The French Dispatch Review:

There is always a funny reaction in film circles when you mention the name Wes Anderson. Either the person you are talking to will start to tell you that Anderson is a genius or they will nod and then say “yeah no thanks.”

Yes like a lot of classic things Anderson is an acquired taste and one that people either love and or hate. Myself? Well, I’m in the former category. I fell in love with the work of Mr. Anderson when I discovered The Darjeeling Limited. I loved its quirkiness, I loved how different it was and from then on I was hooked.

If though you are in the other camp then there is no way that you will ever be able to get into The French Dispatch, for me though this is one of the films of the year. Only Anderson could bring together stories like this and have the end result be something as special as this.

The film is pulled together by a fictional magazine known as The French Dispatch who is edited by the forthright but slightly crazy Arthur Howitzer Jnr (Bill Murray – Lost In Translation). He has pulled together a group of eccentric writers including the intrepid Lucinda Krementz (Frances McDormand – Fargo), J.K.L Berensen (Tilda Swinton – Snowpiercer), the cycling crazy Herbsaint Sazerac (Owen Wilson – Wedding Crashers), and food critic Roebuck Wright (Jeffrey Wright – Shaft).

The film itself is made up of the stories they are telling in their articles from a mysterious painter (Benicio Del Toro – Sicario) who is in love with his prison guard (Lea Seydoux – No Time To Die) through the story of opposing revolutionary leaders who are in love with each other.

That is where there are strengths and weaknesses with this film. The film comes together like a bunch of short films with a common theme, and like all short films, there are the good and bad.  The stories such as the one involving the artist and Owen Wilson’s fast-moving trip through a small town are brilliant but some of the others drag. The good news for audiences though is the good ones clearly outweigh the bad ones.

The stroke of Anderson’s genius is on show throughout the film. His quirky humor is always on show throughout the film and I’ll be quick to admit that I found myself laughing throughout the film. The brilliant thing is that humor comes in all forms – from witty one-liners through to visual humor. The best part though is that every joke lands and gets a laugh.

The other highlight for me was the fact that Anderson brings so many different kinds of filmmaking to the game with this film. From animation, through to fast-paced European comedy and then to classic black and white cinema, there isn’t anything Anderson isn’t willing to try and somehow he ends up being a master to them all.

Likewise always with an Anderson film the cast is a case of a who’s who of Hollywood. Actors like Willem Dafoe (The Card Counter) and Edward Norton (Motherless Brooklyn) turn up in a blink and you will miss them roles but it is the stars of this film that steal the show. Owen Wilson steals the show in his all too brief storyline while Benicio Del Toro shines playing an artistic killer trying to paint while locked away in prison.

As in normally the case with Anderson films it is Bill Murray that brings everything together. When it comes to Anderson’s work Murray is the ringmaster and the film his circus. He leads the way and it is obvious no other actor quite enjoys the quirkiness of Anderson’s work the way that Murray does. Having said that though this is an ensemble film where every actor is at the top of their game and the result is yet another classic Anderson film.

If you are not already a fan of Anderson’s work then this isn’t the film that is going to win you over. This film feels like it has been made for the Anderson tragic, it has his tropes all over it and once again the result is something magical. The film is slightly let down by the weaker ‘parts’ but for the most part this is an enjoyable ride.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Average Subculture Rating:

Other Subculture The French Dispatch Reviews:

Nil

Trailer:

7 Chinese Brothers

Make sure you listen to this week’s episode of The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show to see how you can win a copy of Jason Schwartzman’s new film ’7 Chinese Brothers’ thanks to our good friends at eOne Entertainment. Once you’ve heard the question on the show you can enter on our Facebook or Twitter pages.

And if you don’t win a copy through our giveaway make sure you go and grab a copy in stores now.

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Logo

This week on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Adam, Dave, Greg and Nick take a look at new release films ‘Chasing Asylum,’ ‘Is This The Real World,’ ‘Blood Punch,’ ‘Alice Through The Looking Glass,’ ‘Hunt For The Wilderpeople’ and ‘The Nice Guys’. This episode also contains interviews with Mia Wasikowska, Johnny Depp, Eva Orner, Martin McKenna, Milo Cawthorne, Taika Waititi and Alex Russell (general career).

Also make sure you listen to this week’s episode to see how you can win a copy of Jason Schwartzman’s new film ‘7 Chinese Brothers’ thanks to our good friends at eOne Entertainment. Once you’ve heard the question on the show you can enter on our Facebook or Twitter pages.

You can listen to The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show or download it for free from our Podcast Channel – Listen/Download here.

Saving Mr Banks

Summary: When Walt Disney’s daughters begged him to make a movie of their favourite book, P.L. Travers’ “Mary Poppins,” he made them a promise that he didn’t realize would take 20 years to keep. In his quest to obtain the rights, Walt (Tom Hanks) comes up against a curmudgeonly, uncompromising writer (Emma Thompson) who has absolutely no intention of letting her beloved magical nanny get mauled by the Hollywood machinery. It is only when he reaches into his own childhood that Walt discovers the truth about the ghosts that haunt her, and together make one of the most endearing films in cinematic history..

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 26th December, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA, UK, Australia

Director: John Lee Hancock

Screenwriter: Kelly Marcel, Sue Smith

Cast: Michelle Arthur (Polly), Kathy Baker (Tommie), Melissa Bickerton (Mrs. Corry), Lily Bigham (Biddy), Claire Bocking (Nanny Claire), Annie Rose Buckley (Ginty), Kimberly D’Armond (Katie Nanna), Lynly Ehrlich (Mrs. DaGradi), Colin Farrell (Travers Goff), Paul Giamatti (Ralph), Rachel Griffiths (Aunt Ellie), Tom Hanks (Walt Disney), Kristopher Kyer (Dick Van Dyke), Andy McPhee (Mr. Belhatchett), B.J. Novak (Robert Sherman), Ginger Pauley (Joyce Sherman), Melanie Paxson (Dolly), Jason Schwartzman (Richard Sherman), Victoria Summer (Julie Andrews), Dendrie Taylor (Lillian Disney), Emma Thompson (P.L. Travers), Ronan Vibert (Diarmuid Russell), Thomas R. Waters (Andrew Dutton), Bradley Whitford (Don DaGradi), Ruth Wilson (Margaret Goff)

Runtime: 126 mins

Classification:PG

OUR SAVING MR. BANKS REVIEWS & RATINGS

Greg King: Stars(4.5)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘Saving Mr. Banks’ that is available on http://www.filmreviews.net.au/

David Griffiths:

Do you remember “Mary Poppins?” The all singing and dancing affair with Julie Andrews, Dick Van Dyke and some penguins thrown in for good measure. Well a film set during the making of the 1964 family favourite film “Mary Poppins”  doesn’t exactly have the allure of films such as “Hitchcock” or “Me And Orson Welles”, but don’t be put off because “Saving Mr. Banks” is a film that is pure cinematic masterpiece. While award wins may show that director John Lee Hancock’s last film, “The Blind Side,” was the better film that theory is without a doubt incorrect because “Saving Mr. Banks” is one of the finest films to have come out of Hollywood in a long time.

Many cinema lovers perhaps don’t realise that “Mary Poppins” almost didn’t happen. The fascinating script of “Saving Mr. Banks” chronicles as the reluctant Poppins creator P.L. Travers (Emma Thompson) reluctantly has to make the decision to travel to Los Angeles and talk with Walt Disney (Tom Hanks) about the possibility of her much loved character hitting the big screen.

The idea of Mary becoming an animated buddy for the likes of Mickey Mouse is just too much for Travers and she plans on travelling to L.A. and pretty much telling Disney where he can stick his project. However, money is now a problem for her and she finds herself holding off on saying no to Disney, instead she finds herself reluctantly bonding with her driver, Ralph (Paul Giamatti) and having to sit down with the ‘in-her-eyes-annoying’ Sherman brothers (B.J. Novak and Jason Schwartzmann) – the two men charged with the task of bringing music into Mary Poppins’ world.

At the same time the audience is shown the inspiration behind the Poppins’ book Travers’ relationship with her drunken but loving father Travers Goff (Colin Farrell) and the arrival of her Aunt Ellie (Rachel Griffiths) on the scene.

There is so much to love about Saving Mr. Banks.” Firstly the screenwriting team absolutely nail the characters involved. Those who were close to P.L. Travers and Walt Disney have seen this film and been surprised by just how realistic the characters are. Then there is of course the fact that those same screenwriters have almost brought a sense of suspense to the film. Once you become engrossed in the plot you simply forget that “Mary Poppins” did make the big screen and you find yourself waiting with baited breath as Travers and Disney battle over whether the film will be made.

The other part of “Saving Mr. Banks” that will stun its audience is the flashback sequences to outback Queensland. Not only does this section bring some real heartfelt moments to the film but the scenes allow cinemagoers to once again since the acting stylings of one Colin Farrell. Mr. Farrell has delivered some real dogs of films recently (anybody else see “Total Recall”?) so it’s good to see him embracing the role of Travers Goff and putting in a performance that is worthy of some award nominations.

Also joining Farrell with outstanding performances in “Saving Mr. Banks” are Emma Thompson and Tom Hanks. Thompson becomes the very-British Travers alarmingly well while Hanks puts in a surprising performance of Disney. Technically Hanks shares no physical resemblance to Disney at all but captures the spirit of the man in a way that is sure to garnish him more award glory. This performance on the back of his work in “Captain Phillips” just goes to show why Hanks is one of the better actors of the modern generations.

The words cinematic masterpiece shouldn’t be used lightly but that is exactly what “Saving Mr. Banks” is. This is a charming film that recaptures the magic of Hollywood.

Stars(5)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(4.5)

IMDB Rating:  Saving Mr. Banks (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Saving Mr. Banks′: Please check our Saving Mr. Banks review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep 63.

Trailer: