Tagged: Robert Wade

Summary: 
The story follows John Parker, a 19 year old from Manchester who embarks on a journey to Brighton, the sJames Bond has left active service. His peace is short-lived when Felix Leiter, an old friend from the CIA, turns up asking for help, leading Bond onto the trail of a mysterious villain armed with dangerous new technology.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates:  11th November 2021 (Australia), 7th October 2021 (Thailand), 30th September 2021 (UK), 8th October 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: UK, USA

Director: Cary Joji Fukunaga

Screenwriter: Neal Purvis, Robert Wade, Cary Joji Fukunaga

Cast: Dali Benssalah (Primo Cyclops)), Priyanga Burford (Dr. Symes), Daniel Craig (James Bond), Ana de Armas (Paloma), Coline Defaud (Young Madeline), David Dencik (Valdo Obruchev), Hugh Dennis (Dr. Hardy), Ralph Fiennes (M), Naomie Harris (Moneypenny), Rory Kinnear (Tanner), Lashana Lynch (Nomi), Billy Magnusson (Logan Ash), Rami Malek (Lyutsifer Safin), Brigitte Millar (Vogel), Amy Morgan (Alison Smith), Hayden Phillips (Sir Sebastian D’ath), Lea Seydoux (Madeleine), Lisa-Dora Sonnet (Mathilde), Christoph Waltz (Blofeld), Ben Whishaw (Q), Lizzie Winkler (Alison Smith), Jeffrey Wright (Felix Leiter)

Running Time: 163 mins

Classification: M (Australia), 13 (Thailand), 12A (UK), PG-13 (USA)

OUR NO TIME TO DIE REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ No Time To Die Review:

Bond! James Bond is back! If you a hardcore James Bond fan, and a lot of us are, then the pandemic couldn’t have come at a worse time. Just when everybody was getting excited to see Daniel Craig’s final outing as 007 the world went into chaos, cinemas closed their doors and we watched in dismay as the release of No Time To Die kept on getting pushed back further and further. I would be lying if I admitted there was a time when I was wondering if I would ever get to see this film. Well now the film is in cinemas, and I am happy to say that this is one time where that old wives’ tale of ‘good things come to those that wait’ is actually true.

Craig’s final hoorah begins with Bond retired from active service and happy in a relationship with Madeline (Lea Seydoux – Midnight In Paris). We quickly learn though that she has a dark secret that ties to her to the maniacal and precise Lyutiser Safin (Rami Malek – Bohemian Rhapsody) who is about to unleash a vicious plague across the world.

When good friend Felix Leiter (Jeffrey Wright – Shaft) reaches out to Bond for help Bond finds out that things are very different at the agency. To M (Ralph Fiennes – Schindler’s List), Moneypenny (Naomie Harris – Moonlight) and Q (Ben Whishaw – Cloud Atlas) he is now an outsider whom they question whether they should help, and in fact he has been replaced with a new 007 (Lashana Lynch – Captain Marvel).

But as Bond works hard to try and bring the old team back together again he finds that just like Madeline he must faces ghosts from the past when he finds that perhaps his old foe Blofeld (Christoph Waltz – Django Unchained) may in fact hold the key to how to stop Safin’s heinous plan.

You could forgive the filmmakers behind No Time To Die wanting to do the Fast & Furious game-plan for Daniel Craig’s final Bond film of bigger is better. But luckily for audiences director Cary Joji Fukunaga (Sin Nombre) and his co screenwriters, Neal Purvis (Skyfall) and Robert Wade (Spectre), opted for a different approach.

I’ll admit that I am a fan of their approach. I have always thought that Bond films work better when they are more natural and believable. Perhaps that is why I have been more of a fan of the Craig Bond films then I have of some of the past films. Here Fukunaga again goes for the more natural approach – the villain here is believable and instead of going for bigger-is-better action sequences he goes for some brilliantly shot car chases and fight pieces that in a way are more believable for the audience. The result is something much more suspenseful and memorable than the myriad of city-destroying action films that litter cinemas these days. At times No Time To Die feels like I am watching a big budget episode of Spooks – and I have to say I like that.

Fukunaga and his writers also don’t forget the fact that while they need action set pieces they also need characterisation. I would argue that you see more of Bond’s character and emotions in No Time To Die than we ever had in any other Bond film and the closeness that makes the audience feel to the character seems like a fitting way to farewell Bond out the door. Likewise Madeline and Safin are given an amazing amount of characterisation throughout the script – while we also see different sides to Q and Moneypenny as well. Sadly the same can’t be said for the character of Nomi (the new 007) – there is very little characterisation shown with her and the result is she feels cold and aloof to the audience, although I suspect that may have been a smart little plan by the screenwriters to show her in the same light as how Bond views her.

Aside from the beautifully shot action pieces here, and I have to say that car and motorcycle chases through the cobblestone streets of a small European town is one of the best action sequences in any Bond film, it is the characterisation that makes No Time To Die such a special film. It gives the audience a closeness to the characters that is often rare in action franchises and this is one time when Bond’s sexual/personal relationship is very believable. These scenes are beautifully played out by Craig and Seydoux and that becomes a useful tool for the director when he wants to tug at the heart-strings or raise the suspense.

It feels weird saying that an action film is a beautiful film but No Time To Die certainly is. There is a beauty to the way that Fukunaga has shot this film – a 4WD chase through the mists of Scandinavia certainly attests to that. The believability and sheer brilliance of this film makes No Time To Die not only the best Daniel Craig Bond film but one of the best of the franchise that we have ever seen. This is going to become a well-loved Bond classic.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Kyle McGrath’s No Time To Die Review:

Kyle’s rating Out Of 5:

Average Subculture Rating:

Other Subculture No Time To Die Reviews:

Nil

Trailer:

Spectre Poster

Sony Pcitures have just released a brand new Spectre trailer.

In SPECTRE, a cryptic message from Bond’s past sends him on a trail to uncover a sinister organization. While M battles political forces to keep the secret service alive, Bond peels back the layers of deceit to reveal the terrible truth behind SPECTRE.  Sam Mendes returns to direct SPECTRE, with Daniel Craig reprising his role as 007 for the fourth time. SPECTRE is produced by Michael G. Wilson and Barbara Broccoli, from a script by John Logan and Neal Purvis & Robert Wade.

 SPECTRE follows the release of SKYFALL, the biggest Bond film of all time, which took in $1.1 billion worldwide.  SPECTRE is currently filming in Mexico City.

Summary:

Daniel Craig is back as Ian Fleming’s James Bond 007 in Skyfall, the 23rd adventure in the longest-running film franchise of all time. In Skyfall, Bond’s loyalty to M is test as her past comes back to haunt her. As MI6 comes under attack, 007 must track down and destroy the threat, now matter how personal the cost.

After a four-year absence from screen, direction by Academy Award-Winning Sam Mendes, and the 50th Anniversary celebrations; expectations are high for Skyfall. However, the praise has been universal, with many critics commending the quality of the film, Daniel Craig’s portrayal of the iconic James Bond, and the Oscar-calibre supporting cast. All this adds up to the 007 adventure we’ve been waiting for: a flawlessly assembled thrill ride with a cast to die for.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 22nd November, 2012

Australian DVD/Blu-Ray Release Date: N/A

Country: United Kingdom, United States

Director: Sam Mendes

Screenwriter: Ian Fleming (characters), John Logan, Neal Purvis, Robert Wade

Cast: Javier Bardem (Silva), Daniel Craig (James Bond), Judi Dench (M), Elize du toit (Vanessa), Ralph Fiennes (Gareth Mallory), Albert Finney (Kincade), Naomie Harris (Eve), Rory Kinnear (Tanner), Berenice Marlohe (Severine), Helen McCrory (Clair Dowar MP), Ola Rapace (Patrice), Ben Whishaw (Q), Nicholas Woodeson (Doctor Hall)

Runtime: 143 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Skyfall’ Review:

To see our review of ‘Skyfall’ please check http://www.helium.com/items/2394098-skyfall-movie-review.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Skyfall’: N/A

Rating: 3/5 Stars

IMDB Rating:Skyfall (2012) on IMDb