Tagged: Ronan Vibert

Dracula Untold

Summary: Vampire mythology combined with the true history of Prince Vlad tell the origin of Dracula.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 4th October, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Gary Shore

Screenwriter: Matt Sazama, Burk Sharpless, Bram Stoker (characters)

Cast: Joe Benjamin (Mihai), Mish Boyko (Andrei), Paul Bullion (Nicolae), Dominic Cooper (Mehmed), Charles Dance (Master Vampire), Luke Evans (Vlad), Sarah Gadon (Mirena), Jakob Gierszal (Acemi), Dilan Gwyn (Governess), William Houston (Cazan), Noah Huntley (Captain Petru), Paul Kaye (Brother Lucian), Ferdinand Kingsley (Hamza Bey), Thor Kristjansson (Bright Eyes), Joseph Long (General Omar), Zach McGowan (Shkelgim), Diarmaid Murtagh (Dimitru), Art Parkinson (Ingeras), Arkie Reece (General Ismail), Ronan Vibert (Simion)

Runtime: 92 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR DRACULA UNTOLD REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Greg King: You can check out Greg’s Dracula Untold review on www.filmreviews.net.au

Stars(2.5)

 

Nick Gardiner: You can check out Nick’s Dracula Untold review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #99

Stars(2)

 

David Griffiths:

Somebody had to stand up and take the vampire genre back to the good old days. Call me cynical and old fashioned but as a seasoned fan of vampire flicks I was kind of getting tired of seeing my favourite beastie being portrayed by a pretty boy Englishman who sparkled in the sun while fawning over a frowny, sullen chick named Bella. Well the man who was up to the task of injecting a little bit of gore back into the genre is first time feature director Gary Shore who has somehow managed to find the right balance to make Dracula Untold a pretty good popcorn movie with just enough of a body count to keep the cult fans happy.

Dracula Untold takes vampire fans right back to the beginning, past Bram Stroker right back to the original myth of Transylvania’s favourite saviour, Vlad The Impaler (played here by Luke Evans). Vlad has brought peace to his homeland for a decade, but this is interrupted by the arrival of Turkish warlord Mehmed (Dominic Cooper) who once again demands that 1000 Transylvanian be turned over to his army, a fate that Vlad himself had been through as a child.

While Vlad tries to negotiate to continue the peace Mehmed makes it personal when he demands that Vlad and his wife, Mirena’s (Sarah Gadon) son Ingeras (Art Parkinson) be the 1001st child handed over. This results in Vlad eagerly trying to find a new source of power to overcome the Turks… a dark force that he has previously faced in the mountains.

There is little doubt that many people heading in to see Dracula Untold will be expecting something light and fluffy but instead Shore delivers up a film that sits someone in the realm of Forsaken: Desert Vampires and John Carpenter’s Vampires and that is certainly not a bad thing. There are a couple of easy to spot flaws in the plot but that is easily put to rest with some pretty impressive battle scenes and an air of suspense once you realise that this isn’t exactly a film that is afraid to bump off some of the main characters.

To the screenwriter’s credit they also go back to basics. There is no mucking around with fancy plotlines etc Dracula Untold is a simple story of good versus evil with a healthy subplot revolving around family versus duty for Government members. The screenwriter does take the film to the darker side though, the decision for Vlad to use evil against evil is an interesting take the hero myth and a welcome move away from the squeaky clean image that a lot of heroes seem to have these days. The biggest weakness for the script though is the film’s finale, the scene set in modern times, which I’m not sure actually has to be there unless the producers behind the film are setting it up to be another Hollywood franchise.

The darkness of the screenplay and plot is also brought to the fore by Gary Shore’s directional style. Some may criticise the dark style of the film, but for me it actually worked. Transylvania is in dark times and for a majority of the film the hero can only operate once the sun has gone down, hence filming in low light makes perfect sense and isn’t too much of a distraction for the audience. It’s actually a visual style not too dissimilar to the styles used in other medieval films like Season Of The Witch and Kingdom Of Heaven. As a first time feature director Shore actually handles the film pretty well and uses the countryside of his home, Ireland to good effect. As a result of how Dracula Untold turns out Shore is now a director that I am pretty keen to see what project he picks up next.

The big winner out of Dracula Untold is Luke Evans. Questions were raised when it was recently announced he would star in the reboot of The Crow despite proof he likes the Gothic feel with his work on The Raven and his blockbuster appeal due to The Hobbit franchise. Evans’ version of Vlad The Impaler is pretty much a screen test for The Crow. The dark brooding hero, fuelled by revenge, if he wanted to show his worth to his critics out there he couldn’t have picked a more perfect vehicle, the good news is he does a pretty decent job as well. While Evans shines though his co-stars are not given a hell of a lot to work with. Dominic Cooper plays a smarmy one-dimensional bad guy while Sarah Gadon could easily have done more if she was given more characterisation as well.

Dracula Untold is a fresh view of the original Dracula story. It is a fairly decent action film with a Gothic edge. Some of the popcorn brigade may be a little off put by the high body count and the few scenes of gore but in my book they are a definite plus. The great news is that Dracula Untold (much like Hercules earlier this year) isn’t the turkey that many expected and the vampires don’t sparkle.

Stars(3)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(2.5)

 

IMDB Rating: Dracula Untold (2014) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Reviews of ‘Dracula Untold′: For our full Dracula Untold review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #99 . You can also read Dave’s Dracula Untold review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

Saving Mr Banks

Summary: When Walt Disney’s daughters begged him to make a movie of their favourite book, P.L. Travers’ “Mary Poppins,” he made them a promise that he didn’t realize would take 20 years to keep. In his quest to obtain the rights, Walt (Tom Hanks) comes up against a curmudgeonly, uncompromising writer (Emma Thompson) who has absolutely no intention of letting her beloved magical nanny get mauled by the Hollywood machinery. It is only when he reaches into his own childhood that Walt discovers the truth about the ghosts that haunt her, and together make one of the most endearing films in cinematic history..

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 26th December, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA, UK, Australia

Director: John Lee Hancock

Screenwriter: Kelly Marcel, Sue Smith

Cast: Michelle Arthur (Polly), Kathy Baker (Tommie), Melissa Bickerton (Mrs. Corry), Lily Bigham (Biddy), Claire Bocking (Nanny Claire), Annie Rose Buckley (Ginty), Kimberly D’Armond (Katie Nanna), Lynly Ehrlich (Mrs. DaGradi), Colin Farrell (Travers Goff), Paul Giamatti (Ralph), Rachel Griffiths (Aunt Ellie), Tom Hanks (Walt Disney), Kristopher Kyer (Dick Van Dyke), Andy McPhee (Mr. Belhatchett), B.J. Novak (Robert Sherman), Ginger Pauley (Joyce Sherman), Melanie Paxson (Dolly), Jason Schwartzman (Richard Sherman), Victoria Summer (Julie Andrews), Dendrie Taylor (Lillian Disney), Emma Thompson (P.L. Travers), Ronan Vibert (Diarmuid Russell), Thomas R. Waters (Andrew Dutton), Bradley Whitford (Don DaGradi), Ruth Wilson (Margaret Goff)

Runtime: 126 mins

Classification:PG

OUR SAVING MR. BANKS REVIEWS & RATINGS

Greg King: Stars(4.5)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘Saving Mr. Banks’ that is available on http://www.filmreviews.net.au/

David Griffiths:

Do you remember “Mary Poppins?” The all singing and dancing affair with Julie Andrews, Dick Van Dyke and some penguins thrown in for good measure. Well a film set during the making of the 1964 family favourite film “Mary Poppins”  doesn’t exactly have the allure of films such as “Hitchcock” or “Me And Orson Welles”, but don’t be put off because “Saving Mr. Banks” is a film that is pure cinematic masterpiece. While award wins may show that director John Lee Hancock’s last film, “The Blind Side,” was the better film that theory is without a doubt incorrect because “Saving Mr. Banks” is one of the finest films to have come out of Hollywood in a long time.

Many cinema lovers perhaps don’t realise that “Mary Poppins” almost didn’t happen. The fascinating script of “Saving Mr. Banks” chronicles as the reluctant Poppins creator P.L. Travers (Emma Thompson) reluctantly has to make the decision to travel to Los Angeles and talk with Walt Disney (Tom Hanks) about the possibility of her much loved character hitting the big screen.

The idea of Mary becoming an animated buddy for the likes of Mickey Mouse is just too much for Travers and she plans on travelling to L.A. and pretty much telling Disney where he can stick his project. However, money is now a problem for her and she finds herself holding off on saying no to Disney, instead she finds herself reluctantly bonding with her driver, Ralph (Paul Giamatti) and having to sit down with the ‘in-her-eyes-annoying’ Sherman brothers (B.J. Novak and Jason Schwartzmann) – the two men charged with the task of bringing music into Mary Poppins’ world.

At the same time the audience is shown the inspiration behind the Poppins’ book Travers’ relationship with her drunken but loving father Travers Goff (Colin Farrell) and the arrival of her Aunt Ellie (Rachel Griffiths) on the scene.

There is so much to love about Saving Mr. Banks.” Firstly the screenwriting team absolutely nail the characters involved. Those who were close to P.L. Travers and Walt Disney have seen this film and been surprised by just how realistic the characters are. Then there is of course the fact that those same screenwriters have almost brought a sense of suspense to the film. Once you become engrossed in the plot you simply forget that “Mary Poppins” did make the big screen and you find yourself waiting with baited breath as Travers and Disney battle over whether the film will be made.

The other part of “Saving Mr. Banks” that will stun its audience is the flashback sequences to outback Queensland. Not only does this section bring some real heartfelt moments to the film but the scenes allow cinemagoers to once again since the acting stylings of one Colin Farrell. Mr. Farrell has delivered some real dogs of films recently (anybody else see “Total Recall”?) so it’s good to see him embracing the role of Travers Goff and putting in a performance that is worthy of some award nominations.

Also joining Farrell with outstanding performances in “Saving Mr. Banks” are Emma Thompson and Tom Hanks. Thompson becomes the very-British Travers alarmingly well while Hanks puts in a surprising performance of Disney. Technically Hanks shares no physical resemblance to Disney at all but captures the spirit of the man in a way that is sure to garnish him more award glory. This performance on the back of his work in “Captain Phillips” just goes to show why Hanks is one of the better actors of the modern generations.

The words cinematic masterpiece shouldn’t be used lightly but that is exactly what “Saving Mr. Banks” is. This is a charming film that recaptures the magic of Hollywood.

Stars(5)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(4.5)

IMDB Rating:  Saving Mr. Banks (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Saving Mr. Banks′: Please check our Saving Mr. Banks review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep 63.

Trailer: