Tagged: Bill Pullman

Summary: A corporate defense attorney takes on an environmental lawsuit against a chemical company that exposes a lengthy history of pollution.

Year: 2020

Australian Cinema Release Date: 5th March 2020

Thailand Cinema Release Date: TBA

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Todd Haynes

Screenwriter: Mario Correa, Matthew Michael Carnahan, Nathaniel Rich (newspaper article)

Cast: Jim Azeelvandre (Jim Tennant), Bucky Bailey (himself), Aidan Brogan (Teddy Bilott (aged 12-14)), Jacob Bukowski (Tony Bilott (aged 4)), Graham Caldwell (Teddy Bilott (aged 3-5)), Bill Camp (Wilbur Tennant), Bruce Cromer (Kim Burke), Kevin Crowley (Larry Winter), Denise Dal Vara (Sandra Tennant), Marcia Dangerfield (Grammer), Bella Falcone (Crystal Tennant (aged 11-13)), Mikel Furlow (Silas Pfeiffer (aged 5)), Brian Gallagher (David), Victor Garber (Phil Donnelly), Jeffrey Grover (Edward Wallace), Richard Hagerman (Joe Kiger), William Jackson Harper (James Ross), Beau Hartwig (Tony Bilott (aged 10-11)), Anne Hathaway (Sarah Bilage Bilott), Scarlett Hicks (Amy Tennant (aged 10-12)), Louise Krause (Carla Pfeiffer), Elizabeth Marvel (Dr. Karen Frank), Mary Mengelkoch (Dr. Mary-Sue Kimball), Sydney Miles (Laura Doggett), Barry Mullholland (Charles Holliday), John Newberg (Dr. Gillespie), Bill Pullman (Harry Dietzler), Tim Robbins (Tom Terp), Mark Ruffalo (Rob Bilott), Mike Seely (Dr.Brooks), Nathan Slaughter (Teddy Bilott (aged 7-10)), Keating P. Sharp (Charlie Bilott (aged 11-12)), Abi Van Andel (Kathleen Welch), Mare Winningham (Darlene Kiger)

Running Time: 126 mins

Classification: M (Australia)

 

 

OUR DARK WATERS REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths’ Dark Waters Review

Few films will have the impact on their audience that Dark Waters does. I’d be lying if I said the film didn’t get to me – actually I kind of felt physically ill as the credits rolled. That is in no way a reflection of the quality of the film, my feeling came solely from what the movie had just educated me about. See Dark Waters tells us about something that affects our everyday life but something perhaps most of us don’t even know about. To be brutally honest Dark Waters is perhaps one of the most important films that you should see this year… no make that this is a film you MUST see.

Directed by Todd Haynes (I’m Not There) the film tells the true story of lawyer, Rob Bilott (Mark Ruffalo – The Avengers). Bilott worked for a law firm who represented chemical companies but has his entire world turned upside down when a farmer named Wilbur Tennant (Bill Camp – Joker) walks into his office carrying a box of video tapes he says will support his claim that one of America’s biggest chemical companies, DuPont, is poisoning his farm.

While at first reluctant to take on the case Bilott decides he will after going to visit the farm and talking to his own Grandmother about what has happened. Despite his own wife (Anne Hathaway – Les Miserables) and his boss (Tim Robbins – The Shawshank Redemption) thinking that the case may have ramifications for him Bilott continues on believing that his friendship with DuPont’s lawyer, Phil Donnelly (Victor Garber – Alias) will ensure a smooth case that will lead with a payment to the Tennant family. However as Bilott begins to investigate the case DuPont start to act more aggressively towards him and it soon becomes clear that the case is much bigger than anyone could ever have predicted it would.

Dark Waters is the kind of movie that could have become a sticky trap for director Todd Haynes as a filmmaker. While being a very important whistleblower movie exposing a truth that the world needs to know about for the most part this film is a courtroom drama. At times it is not even that – as there are times when this is a movie literally about a man going through box after box of paper in a bid to try and find what he needs before he can even go to court. How Haynes makes that watchable is the feat of a very great filmmaker indeed. There are even times in this movie where he has to deliver an information dump – and he even makes that something gripping to watch.

Haynes finds suspense in things where there shouldn’t be suspense. The fact that he is able to get the audience on the edge of their seat simply because a character is walking to their car after a mundane meeting is some pretty damn fine filmmaking. Even the scenes of Ruffalo unpacking boxes becomes moments of true intrigue as the audience keeps watching wondering when or if he will ever find that elusive piece of the pie that he needs.

The fact though that this is a movie that impacts us all is something though that not even a filmmaker can manufacture. We’ve all used Teflon with our cooking, hell I can even remember my mother being proud of the fact that she owned pots and pans with Teflon in them. And that is what makes this film some spine-chilling – it is a movie that involves all of us and luckily Haynes is the filmmaker who has decided to tell the world the truth about what exactly happened here… a brave move indeed.

Some people may criticise the film for the fact that some actors and actresses get under used, but I did not see that as an issue at all. Yes, Anne Hathaway does not appear in many scenes early on in the film but that seems to add power to the scenes that she does appear in later in the film. Her scene with Tim Robbins where she scolds him for the way that she has been treating her on-screen husband, his employee, is one of the most powerful scenes in the entire movie and you can easily why the casting team wanted an A-Grade actress in the role.

Then of course there is Mark Ruffalo. Of course now for a generation of film-goers he will be known as The Hulk, but it is films like Dark Waters that reminds us what a great character he is. Going into this film I was a little worried that perhaps I would feel like I was simply watching Mark Ruffalo, but just like he did in the under-rated Infinitely Polar Bear Ruffalo totally absorbs his character and puts in a stunning performance that is worthy of a few award wins along the way.

There is no doubt that Dark Waters is a gripping film made even better by a filmmaker who found the perfect way to bring an important yet potentially dull storyline to the cinema in a creative and entertaining way. Haynes brings in moments of true suspense and mixes them with moments of true genius as he finds an interesting way to even get scientific information across to his audience. There are moments when Dark Waters hits its audience like a sledgehammer right between the eyes and in the end it becomes one of the must see films of 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

Kyle McGrath’s Dark Waters Review

 

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:

 

 

 

IMDB Rating: 
Dark Waters (2019) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Dark Waters Reviews: N/A

Trailer:

Independence Day Resurgence

Summary: Two decades after the first Independence Day invasion, Earth is faced with a new extra-Solar threat. But will mankind’s new space defenses be enough?

Year: 2016

Australian Cinema Release Date: 23rd June 2016

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Roland Emmerich

Screenwriter: Dean Devlin, Roland Emmerich, James Vanderbilt, Nicolas Wright, James A. Woods

Cast: Gbenga Akinnagbe (Agent Travis), Angelbaby (Rain Lao), Arturo del Puerto (Bordeaux), William Fichtner (General Adams), Vivica A. Fox (Jasmine Hiller), Charlotte Gainsbourg (Catherine Marceaux), Jeff Goldblum (David Levinson), Mckenna Grace (Daisy), Evan Bryn Graves (Pilot P. Goodman), Tavis Hammer (Jeffrey Fineman), Chin Han (Commander Jiang), Liam Hemsworth (Jake Morrison), Judd Hirsch (Julius Levinson), Joey King (Sam), Kenny Leu (Ping Li), Lance Lim (Camper Kevin), Robert Loggia (General Grey), Joshua Mikel (Armand), Maika Monroe (Patricia Whitmore), Robert Neary (Captain McQuaide), Hans Obma (Sokolov), Deobia Oparei (Dikembe Umbutu), Bill Pullman (President Whitmore), Jenna Purdy (Voice of Sphere (voice)), Ryan Baloy Rivera (Sgt. P. Howard), Zeb Sanders (Camper Henry), Christian Simpson (Sgt. Fletcher Smith), Donovan Tyee Smith (Camper Marcus), Brent Spiner (Dr. Brakish Okun), Patrick St. Espirit (Secretary of Defense Tanner), John Storey (Dr. Isaacs), Travis Tope (Charlie Miller), Jessie T. Usher (Dylan Hiller), Joel Virgel (Jacques), Sela Ward (President Lanford), Garrett Wareing (Bobby), Nate Warren (Marley Sullivan), Hays Wellford (Felix), Otis Winston (Brian Cole), James A. Woods (Lt. Ritter), Nicolas Wright (Floyd Rosenberg)

Runtime: 120 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

Has there ever been a film that you loved when you were younger that you have revisited as an adult and been bitterly disappointed? It happened to me recently with ‘Independence Day.’ As a kid this movie blew me away, the special effects, the idea that aliens could blow up the White House… and yes even Will Smith (I was addicted to the ‘Fresh Prince Of Air’). Going back to watch it last week though I realised that the film was not as great as I remembered, aside from the special effects it was actually a bit of a cheesy film and probably shouldn’t be considered a classic.

Still I didn’t let me truth defining moment about the original dampen my hopes for ‘Independence Day: Resurgence’, after all I kept telling myself it’s twenty years later, Roland Emmerich has grown as a director and I guiltily kind of enjoyed ‘White House Down.’ Well as it turns out I was horribly wrong, yes it may be twenty years on but Emmerich hasn’t learnt anything new and he is still making the same mistakes that made ‘Godzilla’ and ‘The Day After Tomorrow’ films that might have impressed the masses but had serious film lovers shaking their heads over what they have just seen.

Emmerich’s new storyline has been put together by a team of screenwriters that sees the world as a very different place to what it was 20 years earlier. Humans have embraced the alien technology that was used against them in the previous war giving a very new look to things even as basic as a helicopter. Our old heroes are also very different people as well. Former President Whitmore (Bill Pullman – ‘While You Were Sleeping’) is a depressed mess, his daughter Patricia (Maika Monroe – ‘It Follows’) works at the White House, Dr. Brakish Okun (Brent Spiner – Star Trek: Generations) has been a coma for 20 years, while David Levinson (Jeff Goldblum – ‘Jurassic Park’) travels the world and is considered an ‘alien expert.’ He now answers to the likes of President Lanford (Sela Ward – ‘Gone Girl’) and General Adams (William Fichtner – ‘The Dark Knight’) who have developed a pretty impressive defence system for Earth.

Then there are the newcomers – the likes of bored fighter pilot Jake Morrison (Liam Hemsworth – ‘The Hunger Games’) forced to live in the shadows of the likes of the famous Dylan Hiller (Jessie T. Usher – ‘Teeange’),Charlie Miler (Tarvis Tope – ‘The Town That Dreaded Sundown’) and Dr. Catherine Marceaux (Charlotte Gainsbourg – ‘Antchrist’) a former rival of Levinson’s who now wants to help him. Somehow this mixture of people all have to bring it together and help fight when the aliens return, once again hellbent on destroying Earth.

Perhaps the scariest thing about ‘Independence Day: Resurgence’ (is certainly not the aliens) is the fact that it becomes painfully obvious early on that despite it being twenty years later Emmerich seems to have learnt nothing as a filmmaker. Still there are the bad attempts of humor throughout the film, the awful over-writing of characters that makes them so clichéd and these repetitive tropes that keep turning up in Emmerich films (like a computer telling the characters of the impending danger).

Even worse this time around though are the facts though that Emmerich seems to have borrowed so much from other films, especially the ‘Star Wars’ franchise for this film, and just how unbelievable this film is to its audience. Yes, of course, a story about aliens attacking Earth is supposed to be a believable drama but can anyone buy the fact that two characters that are emotional and physical wrecks after the events of the first film are suddenly able to swing around and be battle ready this time around… one was even in a coma for 20 years but is suddenly able to do his work like nothing has happened.

The other area in which Emmerich manages to lose his audience with this film is the over saturation of characters and the even worse habit of introducing characters well into the film, far too late for you to ever care what happens to them. The result is a film where it is virtually impossible to connect with any of the characters, which in turn means the suspense that should be there in a movie like this is just non-existant. Add that to the fact that you find yourselves laughing at a lot of the dialogue littered throughout the film, or groan at ‘you have the heart of the warrior’ and this soon becomes a film that should be referred to as a let-down of a blockbuster.

The poor screenplay also lets down its cast badly. The likes of Charlotte Gainsbourg and Lima Hemsworth are sadly given nothing to work with and it’s likely people will quickly forget that they even made this film pretty quickly. Likewise if Jeff Goldblum and Bill Pullman thought this was the film that would resurrect their careers then they are very sadly mistaken. And as for the newcomers… well they barely even create a blip on the screen.

With a dreadful screenplay and nothing new when it comes to special effects ‘Independence Day: Resurgence’ ends up being one of the biggest disappointments of 2016. Even worse is the fact that we know another one is on the way… it’s like looking forward to a dentist’s appointment. One to avoid.

 

Stars(2)

 

 

 

Kyle McGrath:

There’s a lot of reliance on nostalgia in making sequels or follow ups ten or twenty after the previous film in a franchise. Recent memory brings up hits like Star Wars episode 7 and Creed but also not so successful films like Zoolander 2. As always with sequels it can be difficult catching lightning in a bottle twice but with a decade or two in between films that can only make it more of a challenge.

Independence Day: Resurgence is a sequel to the 1996 science fiction alien invasion film Independence Day. It’s been 20 years since earthlings with the aid of 90s computer viruses and nuclear weapons fought back and defeated the hostile creatures intent on total genocide of the human race and harvesting of all our planet’s resources. In the aftermath the world’s superpowers have entered a time of general world peace (Adrian Veidt would be so proud) and great advances have been made in space flight with secrets learned from alien technology. Unknown to everyone however is that the aliens sent a distress signal all those years ago and reinforcements are about to arrive.
I look at the original Independence Day as being the Avatar of the mid 90s. It showed us things we had never before seen on such a grand scale in movies, showcased amazing miniature special effects, cemented Roland Emmerich as the king of disaster movies and along with the successes of Bad Boys the previous year and Men in Black the following spring boarded Will Smith to be one of the biggest stars in Hollywood.
So even if the 96 original wasn’t the biggest of critical successes it definitely had a massive impact. Independence Day Resurgence simply doesn’t live up to its predecessor. The film attempts to weave so many threads together in only 2 hours that not enough time is spent on any of them and you wonder why they bothered with half of them.
Even as a 10 year old something that bothered me in the original was how quickly Will Smith’s character got over the death of his wingman during a battle with alien spacecraft. However the gravity of a massive alien invasion, the destruction and devastation of several major cities worldwide was still expressed to the audience. When the use of a nuclear weapon on US soil to destroy an attacking space craft turns out to be fruitless David Levinson (Jeff Goldblum) has a breakdown of sorts because it WAS a big deal. In this film the same character is watching London being destroyed and millions upon millions of people being massacred in front of his eyes yet he and the characters around him are making quips and generally playing for comedic relief. When David afterwards is consoling his new former girlfriend Catherine (Charlotte Gainsborough) as her parents are almost definitely dead it just feels forced.
This is a problem that comes up several times. It seems in an attempt to make the film fun they drove a steamroller through any possible drama the film has. Someone’s loved one is killed, they rage then in no time they’re back to making quips. If a film’s characters aren’t going to care about the end of the world then why should the audience?
After 20 years of disaster movies (seemingly half of which directed by Emmerich himself) audiences may not automatically find anything amazing about seeing the world destroyed anymore. This is made worse by the way in which the bland characters in the film itself don’t seem to care either. Ultimately what it means is a film about a fight for survival of the human race ends up being unreasonably boring.

 

Stars(1.5)

 

 

 

Adam Ross:

You can hear Adam Ross’s Independence Day: Resurgence review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #182.

Stars(2)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(2)

 

IMDB Rating:  Independence Day: Resurgence (2016) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Independence Day: Resurgence reviews: You can also listen to our full Independence Day: Resurgence review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #182.

 

Trailer: