Tagged: Christopher Walken

Summary: A young boy decide to declare war on his Grandfather after his Grandfather moves in and takes his bedroom.

Year: 2020

Cinema Release Dates: 3rd December 2020 (Australia), 8th October 2020 (Thailand), 2020 (UK), 9th October 2020 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: USA, UK, Canada

Director: Tim Hill

Screenwriter: Tom J. Astle, Matt Ember, Robert Kimmel Smith (based on the book by)

Cast: Rutanya Alda (Lynn Marino), Veronica Alcino (Nurse Alice), Juliocaesar Chavez (Billy), Robert De Niro (Ed), Oakes Fegley (Peter), Colin Ford (Russell), Poppy Gagnon (Jennifer), Joe Gelchion (Chuck), James Matin Kelly (Carl), Isaac Kragten (Steve), Laura Marano (Mia), Cheech Marin (Danny), T.J. McGibbon (Emma), Rob Riggle (Arthur), Jane Seymour (Diane), Joanie Stewart (Carla), Lydia Styslinger (Lisa), Uma Thurman (Sally), Christopher Walken (Jerry)

Running Time: 94 mins

Classification: PG (Australia), PG (USA)

OUR THE WAR WITH GRANDPA REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ The War With Grandpa Review:

Sometimes as a movie critic you forget that it is okay for a film to be fun. Somewhere deep down inside your brain you watch a movie and then you try to analyse and pick apart exactly what the director was trying to achieve with the film. Sometimes there are no hidden meanings though, or there are no world changing beliefs that the filmmakers are trying to open the world up to. Sometimes a film is made to do what films were originally made to do – and that is entertain their audience. That, everybody, is exactly what The War With Grandpa was created to do – entertain not just any audience but entertain the entire family at once.

Now I could sit here and write an epic review that analysed every aspect of this film from the costuming through to the editing, but I know that when it comes to a fun movie like The War With Grandpa all you really want to know is whether the film is going to entertain your family or bore them to death… and that I am more than happy to answer by saying if you like fluffy family films then you are going to love this one.

The film centres around Peter (Oakes Fegley – Pete’s Dragon), a young boy who thought his biggest problem for the year was going to be the fact that he is now the ‘small fry’ at his school as he rolls into sixth grade. But then his mother (Uma Thurman Pulp Fiction) drops a bombshell on him that he never saw coming – his grandfather Ed (Robert De Niro – Taxi Driver) is going to be moving into their home and taking over Peter’s room. Yes Peter not only has to give up his room but he is now going to be living amongst the bats and rats in the attic.

Not to be removed from his domain so easily Peter alongside his rag-tag mates decide to declare war on Ed, who counter-acts that declaration by forming a team of his own that includes – Jerry (Christopher Walken – The Deer Hunter) and Diane (Jane Seymour – Dr Quinn, Medicine Woman). That is when the fun really begins.

The reason that The War With Grandpa works so well is because the film does appeal to the whole family. The screenplay provides plenty of laughs for kids as Pete and his friends devise childish pranks to play on Ed while the older generation will value a film that takes them done memory lane as they watch screen favourites like Jane Seymour and Cheech Marin (Tin Cup) having a heap of fun with their roles – even when they are asked to do crazy things like have a dodge-ball war while on a trampoline. Yes, seeing older stars like De Niro and Walken tackle roles where they are seem to be having the times of their lives is all part of the fun of this fun.

Like all good films in this genre though The War With Grandpa does have a bit of a serious side as well. Kids watching the film will see the importance of a family pulling together and lean about the importance of the ‘older generation’ in their lives. They are both very important lessons for kids to take on board so the serious side of the film is certainly not wasted.

Of course most of the interest around this film is going to centre on Robert De Niro. The screen legend has made a name for himself over the past few years in the comedy genre and while some films have been great some have been really terrible. Here De Niro cruises through his role, he is obviously having fun and enjoying himself, and if you group this film with The Comeback Trail then you could say that De Niro’s comedic efforts in 2020 are well and truly on the ‘good’ side of things.

If you are looking to have a fun cinema experience for the whole family then The War With Grandpa is you go to movie for this week. Outrageous and funny The War With Grandpa will appeal to every from 8 to 80 years of age.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Average Subculture Rating:

IMDB Rating:

The War with Grandpa (2020) on IMDb

Other Subculture The War With Grandpa Reviews:

Nil

Trailer:

The Jungle Book

With the film about to be released we decided it was time to bring you this series of The Jungle Book interviews.

 

Scarlett Johansson

Jon Favreau

Christopher Walken

Sir Ben Kingsley

Bill Murray

Idris Elba

Lupita Nyong’o

Neel Sethi

Jersey Boys

Summary: The film tells the story of four young men from the wrong side of the tracks in New Jersey who came together to form the iconic 1960s rock group The Four Seasons, and the rise of star Frankie Valli.  The story of their trials and triumphs are accompanied by the songs that influenced a generation, including “Sherry,” “Big Girls Don’t Cry,” “Walk Like a Man,” “Dawn,” “Rag Doll,” “Bye Bye Baby,” “Who Loves You,” and many more.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 3rd July, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Clint Eastwood

Screenwriter: Marshall Brickman, Rick Elice

Cast: Toni Attell (Adrianne), Miles Aubrey (Charles Calello), Maggie Beal (Antonia Valli), Erich Bergen (Bob Gaudio), Johnny Cannizzaro (Nick DeVito), Dennis Delsing (Finney), Mike Doyle (Bob Crewe), Troy Grant (Ed Sullivan), John Griffin (Billy Dixon), Lacey Hannan (Angela), Elizabeth Hunter (Francine (7 Years Old)), Ashley Rose Joyner (Antonia Valli), Donnie Kehr (Norm Waxman), Grace Kelley (Francine (4 Years Old)), Chaz Langley (Hal Miller), Louis Lombardi (Trulio), Michael Lomenda (Nick Massi), Keith Loneker (Knuckles), Jeremy Luke (Donnie), James Madio (Stosh), Renee Marino (Mary), Rob Marnell (Joe Long), Michael Patrick McGill (Officer Mike), Steve Monroe (Barry Belson), Kathrine Narducci (Frankie’s Mother), Vincent Piazza (Tommy DeVito), Erica Piccininni (Lorraine), Heather Ferguson Pond (Miss Frankie Nolan), Grant Roberts (Johnny), Joseph Russo (Joey), Steve Schirripo (Vito), Vincent Selhorst-Jones (Hank), Freya Tingley (Francine (17 Years Old), Lou Volpe (Frankie’s Father), Christopher Walken (Gyp DeCarlo), Clint Ward (Officer Stanley), John Lloyd Young (Frankie Valli)

Runtime: 130 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR JERSEY BOYS REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Adam Ross: You can check out Adam’s Jersey Boys review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #86

Stars(3)

 

Greg King: You can check out Greg’s Jersey Boys review on www.filmreviews.net.au

Stars(3)

 

Nick Gardener: You can check out Nick’s Jersey Boys review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #86

Stars(3.5)

 

David Griffiths:

You could be forgiven for thinking ‘Clint Eastwood is directing what’ when it was first announced that he would be the director that would bring the award winning stage musical Jersey Boys to the big screen. However dig a little deeper into Eastwood’s career and you’ll see that his is perhaps, outside of Baz Luhrmann, the perfect choice for being at the helm of Jersey Boys.

See while many film lovers like to see Eastwood as the gritty director who brought Gran Torino to the screen but dig a little deeper into Eastwood’s biography and you’ll discover that he is the owner of a record label and also scored the music for films such as Flags Of Our Father and Million Dollar Baby just to name a few.

Perhaps that is one of the biggest reasons why it feels like Jersey Boys is such a let down… Eastwood could have done better but didn’t. There are parts of Jersey Boys that seem to work well. It is probably one of the first films since Moulin Rouge to really bring the whole musical theatre film into the cinema with it. Some of the concert scenes and of course the closing montage look they could have been lifted straight from a Broadway production but there are other sides of this film that become a total letdown.

Anyone who knows the Frankie Valli (John Lloyd Young) story will know that it can’t be told without stories of his links to Mafia kings like Gyp DeCarlo (Christopher Walken) and the fact that he and Tommy DeVito (Vincent Piazza) were convicted criminals before their first number one hits. It’s here where Jersey Boys feels like it lets down its audience. The film needs the nit and grit of a director like a Martin Scorcesce to delve into the murky world of the Mafia, but here it almost seems like Eastwood is scared to sully the Four Seasons’ reputation by going into the muck. The troubled home life of Valli himself is just skirted on so lightly that it feels like you are watching a tele-movie while most of the Mafia related characters becoming walking clichés, despite the efforts of Christopher Walken to try and pull out a good performance.

It’s these parts of Jersey Boys that makes it hard to watch. With all the darker sides of the story missing it feels like you are watching a glossy film with some segments of power pop infused to it, which doesn’t do justice to the story of Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons at all. And to be honest even the scenes of the group on stage seem so stilted you could be confused for believing that Eastwood had simply inserted some shots in from the actual Broadway musical. At some point Eastwood needed to make a call on whether he wanted this to be a music biopic with the power of The Runaways, become a full blown musical like Les Miserables or make it so light and fluffy it should have been a straight-to-DVD flick.

The weakened script and directing also means that the cast’s performances are sub-par. Christopher Walken is completely wasted as he places a clichéd version of Mafia boss Gyp DeCarlo. The biggest cast member to suffer from the weaknesses of Jersey Boys though is John Lloyd Young. Playing Frankie Valli on the big screen should have been the role that had this young actor being talked about as an Oscar nominee or even just been the film that put him on the map, however none of that will happen here because his performance is so hamstrung that it won’t even garnish a second glance from most Hollywood producers. The only cast member that can hold his head high here is Vincent Piazza who plays tough guy Tommy DeVito. Somehow he manages to brush aside the fluff and somehow put together a fairly decent acting performance.

It almost feels like a crime bashing a Clint Eastwood film. The man is certainly a legend and has shown over the years that he is capable of holding his own with the directional heavyweights, but here Eastwood is dangerously out of his depth. He never truly captures the darker side to the Frankie Valli story and as a result both the film and its audience are left wanting more.

 

Stars(2.5)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3)

 

IMDB Rating:  Jersey Boys (2014) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Reviews of ‘Jersey Boys′: For our full Jersey Boys review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #86

Trailer:

 

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show

The boys from ‘The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show’ take a look at the best films performances when an actor has gone against type.

NICK GARDENER’S LIST

Jim Carrey Eternal

  • Morgan Freeman – ‘Now You See Me’
  • Morgan Freeman – ‘Nurse Betty’
  • Jennifer Aniston – ‘Horrible Bosses
  • Jennifer Aniston – ‘We’re The Millers
  • Leonardo DiCaprio – ‘Django Unchained
  • Don Johnson – ‘Django Unchained
  • Vanessa Hudgens – ‘Spring Breakers’
  • Charlize Theron – ‘Monster’
  • Kisten Dunst – ‘Melancholia’
  • Cameron Diaz – ‘Being John Malkovich
  • John Wayne – ‘The Conqueror’
  • Robin Williams – ‘One Hour Photo’
  • Robert De Niro – ‘Meet The Parents’
  • Christopher Walken – ‘Hairspray’
  • Tom Cruise – ‘Collateral’
  • James Stewart – ‘Vertigo’
  • Michael Keaton – ‘Desperate Measures’
  • Jim Carrey – ‘Kick-Ass 2’
  • Jim Carrey – ‘Eternal Sunshine Of The Spotless Mind’
  • Jim Carrey – ‘The Truman Show’
  • Vince Vaughn – ‘Domestic Disturbance’
  • Adam Sandler – ‘Punch Drunk Love’

 

ADAM ROSS’ LIST

Tom Crusie Interview With

  • Ben Kingsley – ‘Sexy Beast’
  • Edward Norton – ‘American History X’
  • Jack Nicholson – ‘About Schmidt’
  • Sean Penn – ‘Milk’
  • Michael Douglas – ‘Behind The Candelabra’
  • Charlize Theron – ‘Monster’
  • Harrison Ford – ‘What Lies Beneath’
  • Tom Cruise – ‘Tropic Thunder’
  • Tom Cruise – ‘Interview With The Vampire’
  • Jim Carrey – ‘The Truman Show’
  • Jim Carrey – ‘Kick-Ass 2’
  • Robin Williams – ‘One Hour Photo’
  • Robin Williams – ‘Insomnia’
  • John Travolta – ‘Pulp Fiction’
  • Russell Crowe – ‘A Beautiful Mind’
  • Pierce Brosnan – ‘The Matador’
  • Halle Berry – ‘Cloud Atlas’
  • Hugh Grant – ‘Cloud Atlas’
  • Tom Hanks – ‘Cloud Atlas’
  • Hugo Weaving – ‘Cloud Atlas’
  • Nicole Kidman – ‘To Die For’

GREG KING’S LIST

Henry Fonda

  • Morgan Freeman – ‘Hard Rain
  • Vince Vaughm – ‘Psycho’
  • Gary Oldman – ‘Prick Up Your Ears’
  • Gregory Peck – ‘The Big Country’
  • Gregory Peck – ‘The Boys From Brazil’
  • Gregory Peck – ‘The Omen’
  • Steve Carell – ‘The Way Way Back’
  • Ashton Kutcher – ‘Jobs’
  • David Koencher – ‘Cheap Thrills’
  • John Travolta – ‘The Punisher’
  • John Travolta – ‘Broken Arrow’
  • Nicole Kidman – ‘The Paperboy’
  • Nicole Kidman – ‘Stoker’
  • Michael Keaton – ‘Batman’
  • Henry Fonda – ‘Once Upon A Time In The West’
  • Frank McMurray – ‘Double Indemnity’
  • Frank McMurray – ‘The Apartment’
  • Elijah Wood – ‘Maniac’
  • Elijah Wood – ‘Sin City’
  • Jack Palance – ‘City Slickers’
  • Michael Cera – ‘Youth In Revolt’
  • Brad Pitt – ‘Inglorious Basterds’
  • Ernest Borgnine – ‘Marty’
  • Albert Brooks – ‘Drive’
  • Matthew McConaughey – ‘Killer Joe’

 

DAVID GRIFFITHS’ LIST

Leonardo DiCaprio Django Unchained

  • Steve Carell – ‘The Way Way Back’
  • Jim Carrey – ‘Man On The Moon’
  • Henry Fonda – ‘Once Upon A Time In The West’
  • Robin Williams – ‘Insomnia’
  • Robin Williams – ‘One Hour Photo’
  • Bill Murray – ‘Get Low’
  • John Stamos – ‘Captive’
  • Leonardo DiCaprio – ‘Django Unchained’
  • Ewan McGregor – ‘Moulin Rouge!’
  • Russell Crowe – ‘Les Miserables’
  • Michael Cera – ‘This Is The End’
  • Ben Affleck – ‘Jay + Silent Bob Strike Back’
  • Matt Damon – ‘Jay + Silent Bob Strike Back’
  • Melissa Gilbert – ‘Ice House’
  • Matthew McConaughey – ‘Mud’
  • Matthew McConaughey – ‘Magic Mike’
  • Matthew McConaughey – ‘Bernie’
  • Tom Cruise – ‘Rock Of Ages’
  • Tom Cruise – ‘Tropic Thunder’
  • Seth Rogen – ‘Take This Waltz’
  • Heath Ledger – ‘The Dark Knight
  • Liam Neeson – ‘Batman Begins’
  • Robert De Niro ‘Stardust’

Performance

Summary:  Set in contemporary Manhattan, PERFORMANCE tells the story of four musicians, bound together by their passion for music and a long, faithful collaboration. The celebrated string quartet struggles to stay together as they mark their 25th anniversary.

When their dignified patriarch and cellist, Peter (Walken) is diagnosed with a terminal illness, it throws the future of the group into question. His attempt to find a replacement player and organise rehearsals for their upcoming concert bring up unresolved issues and grievances.

Daniel (Ivanir) is the first violin. Robert (Seymour Hoffman) plays second violin, but longs to be the lead. Juliette (Keener) plays viola and is married to Robert, and steadfastly refused to consider the quartet without Peter.

Alliances are forged, egos bruised and passions flare as the dysfunctional family of artists begin to implode. Can they pull together for one final great performance – of Beethoven’s Opus 131 at Carnegie Hall?

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 14th March, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Yaron Zilberman

Screenwriter: Seth Grossman, Yaron Zilberman

Cast: Liraz Charhi (Pilar), Philip Seymour Hoffman (RobertGelbart), Mark Ivanir (Daniel Lerner), Madhur Jaffrey (Dr. Nadir), Catherine Keener (Juliette Gelbert), Nina Lee (Nina Lee), Megan McQuillan (Brenda), Imogen Poots (Alexandra Gerbert), Wallace Shawn (Gideon Rosen), Anne Sofie von Otter (Miriam), Christopher Walken (Peter Mitchell), Andrew Yee (Steve)

Runtime: 106 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Performance’ Review: Please check Dave’s review of ‘Performance’ that is available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Performance′: Check Episode #24 (available 14th March, 2013) of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Performance’.

Rating: 4/5

IMDB Rating:A Late Quartet (2012) on IMDb

Seven Psycopaths

Summary:A struggling screenwriter inadvertently becomes entangled in the Los Angeles criminal underworld after his oddball friends kidnap a gangster’s beloved Shih Tzu.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 8th November, 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: 13th March, 2013

Country: UK

Director: Martin McDonagh

Screenwriter: Martin McDonagh

Cast: Lionel D. Carson (Corporal Nobel), Linda Bright Clay (Myra), Abbie Cornish (Kaya), Kevin Corrigan (Dennis), Colin Farrell (Marty), Woody Harrelson (Charlie), James Landry Hebert (Killer), Zeljko Ivanek (Paulo), Olga Kurylenko (Angela), Michael Pitt (Larry), Sam Rockwell (Billy), Brendan Sexton III (Young Zachariah), Gabourey Sidibe (Sharice), Michael Stuhlbarg (Tommy), Joseph Lyle Taylor (Al), Tom Waits (Zachariah), Christopher Walken (Hans), Amanda Mason Warren (Maggie)

Runtime: 110 mins

Classification:MA15+

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Seven Psychopaths’ Review: 

Please check Dave’s review of ‘Seven Psychopaths’ on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Seven Psychopaths′: Check Episode #7 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Seven Psychopaths’.

Rating: 3.5/5

IMDB Rating:Seven Psychopaths (2012) on IMDb

Performance

Summary: Set in contemporary Manhattan, PERFORMANCE tells the story of four musicians, bound together by their passion for music and a long, faithful collaboration. The celebrated string quartet struggles to stay together as they mark their 25th anniversary.

When their dignified patriarch and cellist, Peter (Walken) is diagnosed with a terminal illness, it throws the future of the group into question. His attempt to find a replacement player and organise rehearsals for their upcoming concert bring up unresolved issues and grievances.

Daniel (Ivanir) is the first violin. Robert (Seymour Hoffman) plays second violin, but longs to be the lead. Juliette (Keener) plays viola and is married to Robert, and steadfastly refused to consider the quartet without Peter.

Alliances are forged, egos bruised and passions flare as the dysfunctional family of artists begin to implode. Can they pull together for one final great performance – of Beethoven’s Opus 131 at Carnegie Hall?

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 14th March, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Yaron Zilberman

Screenwriter: Seth Grossman, Yaron Zilberman

Cast: Liraz Charhi (Pilar), Philip Seymour Hoffman (RobertGelbart), Mark Ivanir (Daniel Lerner), Madhur Jaffrey (Dr. Nadir), Catherine Keener (Juliette Gelbert), Nina Lee (Nina Lee), Megan McQuillan (Brenda), Imogen Poots (Alexandra Gerbert), Wallace Shawn (Gideon Rosen), Anne Sofie von Otter (Miriam), Christopher Walken (Peter Mitchell), Andrew Yee (Steve)

Runtime: 106 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘A Late Quartet’ Review:

Films such as ‘The Runaways’ and ‘Almost Famous’ work because they are about rock music right? But is it possible that a film about classical music could be just as dramatic and gritty? It seems like the answer should be no but ‘A Late Quartet’ (known as ‘Performance’ in some film markets so it can’t be confused with Dustin Hoffman’s ‘Quartet’) proves that theory very wrong indeed, because this well-written drama is about as tense as you can get. 

Robert Gelbert (Philip Seymour Hoffman), Peter Mitchell (Christopher Walken), Juliette Gelbert (Catherine Keener) and Daniel Lerner (Mark Ivanir) are at the top of their game. Their successful quartet is highly regarded and sells countless albums while they also get to tour the world packing out concert halls as they do. 

But then things start to fall apart for the talented musicians. First of all Peter learns that he is suffering from the early stages of Parkinson’s Disease and informs the group that he no longer knows how long he will be able to keep playing for. Then Robert and Juliette’s marriage seem to hit the skids as Robert grows more jealous of Daniel being lead violinist. 

As if all of that isn’t already putting stress on the quartet Juliette starts to wonder whether or not she wants to continue in the group if Peter isn’t around while Daniel heads into a taboo relationship with Robert and Juliette’s daughter Alexandra (Imogen Poots) who is a budding musician herself. 

Director/screenwriter Yaron Zilberman teams up with Seth Grossman to deliver a classy drama that leaves its audience absolutely intrigued. All of the characters are likable and you can’t help but feeling sad when your realize that life is taking dramatic turns for all of them, Zilberman makes the relationship between the four central characters extremely claustrophobic and incestuous which only enhances the suspense and drama of the film. So good is Zilberman’s work on the film that it comes as some surprise when you learn that this is his debut feature film (he only had one documentary to his credit before), this is proof that he is one talented filmmaker who has a rosy future ahead of him. 

Sometimes the use of classical music in a film can scare off audience members who expect the film to be pompous and snobby, but that certainly isn’t the case with ‘A Late Quartet’/’Performance’. While the film does rest heavily on the world of classical music you certainly don’t need any knowledge of that world to understand what the characters are going in. 

As you would expect from a cast of this caliber the performances are amazing. Philip Seymour Hoffman is his usual best and he is well supported by Mark Ivanir and Catherine Keener. Christopher Walken puts in one of his best performances in years (surprisingly he hasn’t garnished some award nominations for his performance) while young Imogen Poots really announces herself as a star of the future with a standout performance. 

‘A Late Quartet’/’Performance’ is a brilliantly written character drama that should alert the cinema world to the fact that Yaron Zilberman is a director to watch. 

 

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘A Late Quartet′: Check Episode #24 (available 14th March, 2013) of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘A Late Quartet’.

Rating: 4/5

IMDB Rating:A Late Quartet (2012) on IMDb