Tagged: Josh Thomson

Summary:  When her all-male house-cleaning business gets out of control, a mature woman must embrace her own sexuality, if she is to make a new life for herself.

Year: 2022

Cinema Release Dates:  19th May 2022 (Australia), 22nd July 2022 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA.

Country: Australia

Director: Renee Webster

Screenwriter: Renee Webster

Cast: Nicola Bartlett (Prue), Caroline Brazier (Sandra), Emily Rose Brennan (Alice), Ying Chu (Officer Lim), Troy Coward (Harry), Cameron Daddo (Adrian), Hannah Day (Officer Tremby), Sam Dudley (Detective Noakes), Alexander England (Tom), Andrea Gibbs (Detective Elliott), Liam Graham (Officer Mason), Milu Green (Officer Cooper), Julia Hales (Kylie), Roz Hammond (Claudia), Megan Hollier (Molly), Emma Jackson (Bree), Lee Jankowski (Officer Levi), Ryan Johnson (Anthony), Priscilla Le (Alia), Monica Main (Adrianna), Katherine Marmion (Nerida), Hayley McElhinney (Hayley), Maggie Meyers (Maggie), Catherine Moore (Fiona), Takia Morrison (Mandy), Ben Mortley (Gary), Claire Munday (Jules), Fraser Murray (Officer Trent), Alexandra Nell (Biatta), Dan Paris (Mike), Sally Phillips (Gina), Myles Pollard (Richard), Suesha Rana (Wendy), Alexandria Steffensen (Pamela), Erik Thomson (Steve), Josh Thomson (Ben), Sherrilee Walsh (Amanda), Tasma Walton (Monique), Oliver Wenn (Brett), Asher Yasbincek (Chloe), Nina Young (Jane)

Running Time: 107 mins

Classification: TBC (Australia)

OUR HOW TO PLEASE A WOMAN REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ How To Please A Woman Review:

Often when people talk about the Australian cinema industry they will pull out the old line “oh we make great cult films.” Well as an industry I have to say we do more than just that. We also make some pretty intense dramas and we’ve made some classic comedies over the years as well. Actually when I really think about it we have made some brilliant comedies over the years – films like The Castle, Crocodile Dundee and Crackerjack that have all become classics and could only have been created with that unique Australian sense of humour.

That tradition of good Australia comedy continues with brand new film How To Please A Woman – a film that sees director/screenwriter Renee Webster (The Heights) deliver a film I found to mix just the right amount of comedy and drama.

The film centres around Gina (Sally Phillips – Bridget Jones’s Diary) a middle-aged woman who finds herself stuck in a sexless marriage with her husband, Adrian (Cameron Daddo – Hope Island), and fired from her job which she excels at.

Her friends from the local swimming club decide to spice things up for her on her birthday and hire her a male giggalo, Tom (Alexander England – Gods Of Egypt). However, when the awkward Gina decides that she doesn’t want to have sex with him but would love for to clean her house an idea forms in her mind. Then when she discovers that Tom works for a removalist company that is about to close down she suddenly comes up with an idea for a new business where she would hire Tom and his colleagues Steve (Erik Thomson Somersault), Anthony (Ryan Johnson – Son Of The Mask) and Ben (Josh Thomson – The New Legends Of Monkey).

What I found I enjoyed most about this film was that Webster found the perfect tone for the film. Yes at the heart of this film is a comedy but also the more dramatic elements of the film explore a lot of topics that are often taboos to be talked about in society. The film explores middle-aged women wanting to have sex in a tasteful way, it also looks at women being fired from their jobs because of their age and also what happens when a long-lasting marriage starts to fizzle out.

Male audience members also shouldn’t feel like they are going to be left out while watching the film. Through the character of Steve it explores the depression that can sink in when a middle-aged man loses both his marriage and his business and it respectfully looks at how many men have no idea how to pleasure a woman when it comes to sex (through no fault of their own) and the looming cloud of unemployment in modern society.

One part I especially loved is the fact that the film also doesn’t make Gina out to be a flawless character, in fact there is one touching storyline that sees Gina judge one of her colleagues and why she isn’t one of the ones losing her job only too later find out not only has she body-shamed the women but also judged her intelligence and worth because of her looks.

I hope though what I have said here makes you feel that How To Please A Woman is a film that will bog you down with serious tones because that simply isn’t the case. There are a lot of comedic moments to be found throughout the film but Webster is a gifted enough filmmaker to fit them in amongst the film’s message in a well-written and subtle manner.

When it comes to the acting side of things Sally Phillips and Erik Thomson steal the show. Phillips matches the tone of the film well knowing the right time to deliver comedy and really delivering when she is called to act out the more dramatic moments of the film. Erik Thomson also delivers a solid performance alongside Phillips while Alexander England is almost guaranteed to land some Hollywood work off the back of this film.

How To Please A Woman is a pleasurable drama-comedy that reveals a new talent in Australia’s filmmaking alumni with the arrival of Renee Webster in a big way. Thoroughly delightful from start to finish with a really important message at its core.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

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Summary: Miles is stuck in a dead-end job, still in love with his ex-girlfriend Nova. Unbeknownst to him, a gang called Skizm is running a deadly competition within his city in which complete strangers fight to the death for the entertainment of an online audience of millions. Miles soon finds himself caught up in the game and forced to fight in a battle to the death. Initially, Miles’ lifetime of running from his problems pays off as he manages to elude his first opponent but when Nova is kidnapped, he must finally stop running and overcome his fears to fight for the girl he loves.

Year: 2019

Australian Cinema Release Date: 28th February 2020

Thailand Cinema Release Date: 9th April 2020

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United Kingdom, Germany, New Zealand

Director: Jason Lei Howden

Screenwriter: Jason Lei Howden

Cast: Anne Alexander-Sieder (Martha Seabert), Natasha Liu Bordizzo (Nova), Grant Bowler (Degraves), Milo Cawthorne (Hadley), Logan Cole (Daddy Doubletaps), Rhys Darby (Glenjamin), Ned Dennehy (Riktor), Hanako Footman (Ruby), Stephen Grey (Vadim), Jacqueline Lee Guerts (Irine Degraves), Aaron Jackson (Clement), Richard Knowles (Xander), Aaron McGregor (Jock), Colin Moy (Clive), Racheal Ofori (Effie), Bella Paddin (Young Nix), Daniel Radcliffe (Miles), Jack Riddiford (Shadwell), Mark Rowley (Dane), Set Sjostrand (Fuckface), Josh Thomson (Grim), Janos Tiborcz (Graveworm), Samara Weaving (Nix), Joe Witkowski (Longshot), Edwin Wright (Stanton)

Running Time: 95 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia) TBC (Thailand)

 

 

OUR GUNS AKIMBO REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths’ Guns Akimbo Review:

I have always felt for young actors and actresses who seem to have their careers tarnished by the very role that made them famous. A lot of people seem to disagree that it even happens but then how many times did you hear ‘not that guy from Twilight’ when Robert Pattinson was recently cast as Batman?

What the actor really needs is a role that is so far removed from their early career that it makes audiences see them in a different light, why do you think so many young stars try to do a role that involves nudity as soon as they turn eighteen?

One actor that has been desperately trying to break the mould set for him by his breakout role is Daniel Radcliffe. Radcliffe has tried so valiantly to try and shake off the Harry Potter tag – he’s done Australian films, gone to the dramatic extremes in Kill Your Darlings but the tag only seemed to lift a little when he stunned cinema-goers with the obscure but brilliant Swiss Army Man. Now Radcliffe hopes to shrug off the rest of that tag with a sheer brilliant performance in a film that is guaranteed to become a cult classic – Guns Akimbo.

Here Radcliffe plays Miles, a games programmer who is stuck in a dead-end job that he loathes with a boss who is nothing but a bully. While he hates his job, he hates his life even more as his recent separation from his girlfriend Nova (Natasha Liu Bordizzo – Hotel Mumbai) only seems to remind him just how in love with her he was.

In a state of boredom one night he leaves a trolling comment on the website of a popular death match reality game that is being run by an extremely violent organisation called Skizm. Angered by the comment the group’s leader, the psychopathic Riktor (Ned Dennehy – Mandy) has Miles captured and then has his goons bolt weapons to his hands. He then places Miles in the game and has him compete against the reigning champion, the criminally insane Nix (Samara Weaving – Ready Or Not), who believes one more kill will see her free of the game and then finally able to live her life the way that she wants to.

If the plot sounds insane it is because that is exactly what it is. It is the last kind of film that you would ever expect Radcliffe to want to be cast in yet somehow his performance grouped together by the fact that the film is in the capable hands of Deathgasm director Jason Lei Howden sees it become a cult classic that cinema lovers are going to lap up right away.

One of the keys to the film working is the fact that Howden is a cult film lover himself. His love for video games and 1980s action films here is so obvious. The film almost seems to have ‘levels’ that the characters have to get past while the fact that his graphic violence was certain to attract a R Rating also didn’t seem to scare him. At times it feels like as a director he was saying ‘let’s put another headshot in there’ and see what they do. Then there is also a killer soundtrack that features everyone from Dead Or Alive to Cypress Hill and even Iggy Pop. What Howden has made here is a film that he himself would want to watch and the result is one of the best action films of the past few years.

That is further enhanced by the fact that as a filmmaker Howden doesn’t try to make Guns Akimbo anything that it’s not. It’s a basic shoot-‘em up with a little bit of humour thrown in for good measure. And while the film doesn’t strive to be anything else it does end up making a lot of commentary about the morals of modern day reality television and delivering a better female hero than even Birds of Prey could manage.

Yes, we may have been blown away by Samara Weaving’s recent performances in The Babysitter and Ready Or Not but here she takes her acting to a whole new level. Weaving doesn’t just stop at having fun during some daring action sequences instead she brings real characterisation to a character that could have easily become a one-dimensional anti-hero. Even when she is trying to hunt down and kill everyone’s favourite loser – Miles – you can’t help but feel a little bit of remorse for Nix, despite her being a bad-ass.

Then there is Radcliffe who seems to embrace the fact that he is given the opportunity to play such an off-beat character. Like Weaving he mixes characterisation with action and seems to deliver just the right amount of method acting to show that perhaps a lot of cinema-goers have misjudged Radcliffe on just how good his acting ability can be. His scene with Rhys Darby in this film shows he also has a flair for comedy as well.

If you like your action flick to be a little left of centre and bordering on the gruesome then Guns Akimbo is the film for you. The fresh creative nature of the film shows why Jason Lei Howden is a director who can potentially breathe a new sense creativity into the action genre, while the film itself is the perfect vehicle to show that world that Daniel Radcliffe has well and truly outgrown his Harry Potter wand.

 

 

 

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IMDB Rating:  Guns Akimbo (2019) on IMDb

 

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