Tagged: Lana Wachowski

Summary: 
Return to a world of two realities: one, everyday life; the other, what lies behind it. To find out if his reality is a construct, to truly know himself, Mr. Anderson will have to choose to follow the white rabbit once more.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates:  26th December 2021 (Australia), 16th December 2021 (Thailand), 22nd December 2021 (UK), 22nd December 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: 22nd December 2021 (USA)

Country: USA

Director: Lana Wachowski

Screenwriter: Lana Wachowski, David Mitchell, Aleksander Hemon

Cast: Yahya Abdul-Mateen II (Morpheus/Agent Smith), Freema Agyeman (Astra), Daniel Bernhardt (Agent Johnson), London Breed (Calliope), Volkhart Buff (Kush), Andrew Lewis Caldwell (Jude), Gaige Chaturantabut (Donnie), Priyanka Chopra Jonas (Sati), Stephen Dunlevy (Agent Jones), Julian Grey (Brandon), Jonanthan Groff (Smith), Joshua Grothe (Funktion), Neil Patrick Harris (The Analyst), Jessica Henwick (Bugs), Ellen Hollman (Echo), Telma Hopkins (Freya), Erendira Ibarra (Lexy), Purab Kohli (Zen), Mumbi Maina (Ellster), Max Mauff (Quillion), Carrie-Ann Moss (Trinity/Tiffany), Toby Onwumere (Sequoia), Max Riemelt (Shepherd), Cooper Rivers (GJ), Andrew Rothney (Scott), Jada Pinkett Smith (Niobe), Keanu Reeves (Neo/Thomas Anderson), Christina Ricci (Gwyn de Vere), Leo Sheng (Bobbi), Brian J. Smith (Berg), Michael X. Sommers (Skroce), Chad Stahelski (Chad), Sabrina Strehl (Fiona), Amadei Weiland (Agent White), L. Trey Wilson (Hanno), Lambert Wilson (The Merovinigian)

Running Time: 148 mins

Classification: M (Australia), G (Thailand), 15 (UK), R (USA)

OUR THE MATRIX RESURRECTIONS REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ The Matrix Resurrections Review:

There is very little doubt that the original Matrix movie, released way back in 1999, changed cinema forever. For years directors like James Cameron and Steven Spielberg had been at the forefront of changing the visual look of the films that we went to see in cinemas. Suddenly this action film came from some unknown Australians that visually looked like something that had never been seen before. The film itself took the action style of Hong Kong martial arts films and mixed it with mind-bending special effects that quickly won over a legion of fans.

The thing about the original film, and something that became painfully obvious as the sequels were released in subsequent years was that while The Matrix looked good the storyline itself was a bit of a weakness. It is the kind of story that people either never fully understand or find themselves thinking about so much that they end up developing their own theories which may or may not be along the lines of the what the creators were hoping to achieve.

Now comes the fourth instalment in the franchise – The Matrix: Resurrections – and the general consensus among fans is the fact that they hope this film answers some questions from the past films while also helps them to forget some of the franchises’ shortfalls.

Directed and written by Lana Wachowski (Jupiter Ascending) the film finds Neo (Keanu Reeves – John Wick) working as a games developer and completely unaware of the Matrix and his involvement in it. In fact his only awareness of his past is what he thinks was a mental breakdown, something that he meets with his therapist (Neil Patrick Harris How I Met Your Mother) to regularly talk about.

But soon his mundane life is turned upside down when he meets Bugs (Jessica Henwick – Game Of Thrones) and Morpheus (Yahya Abdul-Mateen II – Aquaman) and they begin to fill in some blanks that soon has him realising there may be more to the connection that he seems to have with a mysterious woman who he meets in his local coffee shop, Tiffany (Carrie-Anne Moss – Memento).

That plot-line does sound very thin and to be honest that is the biggest weakness of The Matrix: Resurrections. Once again we have a Matrix film that looks brilliant, but once again we also have a film where the plot is dangerously thin and at times is attempted to be fleshed out by exposition.

Probably the best way to approach the film is to see it as something that is visually going to wow you but isn’t going to win any awards for screenwriting. I would be lying however if I said that this film doesn’t draw you in – it certainly does that.

The most intriguing part of the film is watching Neo trying to put together all the jigsaw pieces in his head. And to Lana Wachowski’s credit that does work although perhaps it could have been done in a faster way. Like always although the plot itself is thin the script is convoluted and to be honest there are a number of scenes that feel like they shouldn’t even be there… especially given the long running time.

There are times throughout the film were the film almost seems aware of itself as the characters talk about reboots and franchises etc and while on the surface it appears smart after reflection it feels a little out of place, especially given that this film works best when it is delivering on action or the suspense of the ‘rescuers’ trying to recruit Neo and find Trinity.

As we have come to expect from this franchise the best thing about is the visuals. The action sequences captured by Wachowski and cinematographers Daniele Massaccesi (Under The Skin) and John Toll (Braveheart) are brilliant, creative and to be honest are the heart and soul of this film. While the screenplay maybe lacking the action set pieces certainly aren’t.

When it comes to acting Neil Patrick Harris steals the show. He is brilliant as The Analyst and not only does he steal every scene that he is in but he seems to find the best of a weak script and makes the character truly his and a remarkable villain. Jessica Henwick is also great as Bugs and she does such a good job that she is a character that needs to be explored more if we see more Matrix films.

As a bit of a downer though it does become obvious that this film is let down by the fact that Hugo Weaving and Laurence Fishburne don’t return to their iconic roles. Yahya Abdul-Mateen II and Jonathon Groff (Frozen) do an okay job in their roles, but it certainly isn’t the same and there is very little explanation given to the change in appearance of the characters.

The Matrix: Resurrections is one of those films that will wow you with its visuals but don’t expect anything special when it comes to plot or screenplay. The story is paper-thin and at times will have you thinking ‘huh?’ Sadly this is no better than any of the other Matrix sequels but hopefully it is setting us up for something special in the future.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Average Subculture Rating:

Other Subculture The Matrix Resurrections Reviews:

Nil

Trailer:

From visionary filmmaker Lana Wachowski comes “The Matrix Resurrections”, the long-awaited next chapter in the groundbreaking franchise that redefined a genre. The new film reunites original stars Keanu Reeves and Carrie-Anne Moss in the iconic roles they made famous, Neo and Trinity.

In “The Matrix Resurrections,” return to a world of two realities: one, everyday life; the other, what lies behind it. To find out if his reality is a physical or mental construct, to truly know himself, Mr. Anderson will have to choose to follow the white rabbit once more. And if Thomas…Neo…has learned anything, it’s that choice, while an illusion, is still the only way out of—or into—the Matrix. Of course, Neo already knows what he has to do. But what he doesn’t yet know is the Matrix is stronger, more secure and more dangerous than ever before.  Déjà vu.

Reeves reprises the dual roles of Thomas Anderson/Neo, the man once saved from the Matrix to become the savior of humankind, who will once again have to choose which path to follow. Moss portrays the iconic warrior Trinity… or is she Tiffany, a suburban wife and mother of three with a penchant for superpowered motorcycles?

Yahya Abdul-Mateen II (“Candyman”, the “Aquaman” franchise) plays the wise and worldly Morpheus who, as always, serves as a guide to Neo while also fulfilling his own greater purpose on a very singular journey of self-discovery. Jessica Henwick (TV’s “Iron Fist”, “Star Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens”) plays the hacker Bugs, the proverbial white rabbit on a mission to discover the one who sacrificed himself for humankind–and willing to take any risk necessary in search of the legend she idolizes.

Jonathan Groff (“Hamilton”, TV’s “Mindhunter”), plays Thomas Anderson’s business partner, a slick, confident corporate type with insouciant charm, a disarming smile and an eye on the bottom line–everything Mr. Anderson is not. Neil Patrick Harris (“Gone Girl”) plays Thomas’ therapist, working closely with his patient to understand the meaning behind his dreams and to distinguish them from reality.

Priyanka Chopra Jonas (TV’s “Quantico”) plays a young woman with a wisdom that belies her years and an ability to see the truth, no matter how murky the waters. And Jada Pinkett Smith (“Angel Has Fallen”, TV’s “Gotham”) returns as Niobe, the fierce General who once fought for the survival of Zion and who now sees to the welfare of her people with a familiar fire in her eyes, despite a sense of disbelief and suspicion upon Neo’s return.

Lana Wachowski directed from a screenplay by Wachowski & David Mitchell & Aleksandar Hemon, based on characters created by The Wachowskis. The film was produced by James McTeigue, Lana Wachowski and Grant Hill. The executive producers were Garrett Grant, Terry Needham, Michael Salven, Karin Wachowski, Jesse Ehrman and Bruce Berman. Wachowski’s creative team behind the scenes included “Sense8” collaborators: directors of photography Daniele Massaccesi and John Toll, production designers Hugh Bateup and Peter Walpole, editor Joseph Jett Sally, costume designer Lindsay Pugh, visual effects supervisor Dan Glass, and composers Johnny Klimek and Tom Tykwer.

Pixels Image

The 2016 Golden Razzie nominations have just been announced. The biggest winners (ah…losers) are Fifty Shades Of Grey (with 6 nominations), Jupiter Ascending (6), Paul Blart Mall Cop 2 (6), Pixels (6) and Fantastic Four (5).

And the nominations are:

 

WORST ACTOR

Johnny Depp (Mordecai)

Jamie Dornan (Fifty Shades Of Grey)

Kevin James (Paul Blart Mall Cop 2)

Adam Sandler (The Cobbler + Pixels)

Channing Tatum (Jupiter Ascending)

WORST SUPPORTING ACTOR

Chevy Chase (Hot Tub Time Machine 2 + Vacation)

Josh Gad (Pixels + The Wedding Ringer)

Kevin James (Pixels)

Jason Lee (Alvin & The Chipmunks: Road Chip)

Eddie Redmayne (Jupiter Ascending)

WORST ACTRESS

Katherine Heigl (Home Sweet Hell)

Dakota Johnson (Fifty Shades of Grey)

Mila Kunis (Jupiter Ascending)

Jennifer Lopez (The Boy Next Door)

Gwyneth Paltrow (Mortdecai)

WORST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

Kayley Cuoco-Sweeting (Alvin & The Chipmunks Road Chip + The Wedding Ringer)

Rooney Mara (Pan)

Michelle Monaghan (Pixels)

Julianne Moore (Seventh Son)

Amanda Seyfried (Love The Coopers + Pan)

WORST DIRECTOR

Andy Fickman (Paul Blart Mall Cop 2)

Tom Six (Human Centipede 3 Final Sequence)

Sam Taylor-Johnson (Fifty Shades of Grey)

Josh Tank (Fantastic Four)

Andy & Lana Wachowski (Jupiter Ascending)

WORST PICTURE

Fantastic Four

Fifty Shades Of Grey

Jupiter Ascending

Paul Blart Mall Cop 2

Pixels

WORST REMAKE, RIP-OFF OR SEQUEL

Alvin & The Chipmunks: Road Chip

Fantastic Four

Hot Tub Time Machine 2

Human Centipede 3 (Final Sequence)

Paul Blart Mall Cop 2

WORST SCREEN COMBO

All Four Fantastics (Fantastic Four)

Johnny Depp + His Glued On Mustache (Mortdecai)

Jamie Dornan + Dakota Johnson (Fifty Shades of Grey)

Kevin James + His Glued On Mustache + His Segue (Paul Blart Mall Cop 2)

Adam Sandler + Any Pair Of Shoes (The Cobbler)

WORT SCREENPLAY

Fantastic Four

Fifty Shades of Grey

Jupiter Ascending

Paul Blart Mall Cop 2

Pixels

REDEEMER AWARD

Elizabeth Banks (Movie 47 to Pitch Perfect 2)

M. Night Shyamalan (Previous Winner to The Visit)

Will Smith (After Earth to Concussion)

Sylvester Stallone (All Time Razzie Champ to Creed)

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Logo

This week on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Adam, Dave, Greg and Nick take a look at new release films ‘Rosewater,’ ‘A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night’ and ‘Jupiter Ascending′ . This episode also contains interviews with Lana Wachowski, Andy Wachowski, Mila Kunis and Eddie Redmayne. 

To listen to the show you can download it for free from our Podcast Channel – Listen/Dowload here.

Tom Selleck

It’s what every young actor dreams of, they are offered a role in a film that looks like it could become a blockbuster. So what do you do? Phone Mum and Dad? Jump in the air? Well for some Hollywood actors they decided to say no… yes that’s right say no to what could have become one of the biggest roles of their career. Let’s have a look at the men who had the nerve to say ‘no.’

Tom Selleck – It almost seems like something that could have happened in another universe, but believe or not Harrison Ford wasn’t actually the producers first choice to play the legendary explorer Indiana Jones. When pre-production first started on “Indiana Jones And The Temple Of Doom” way back in the early 1980s the producers wanted the mustached-one himself, Tom Selleck to play the action hero. At the time Selleck was hot property due to the fact that he was playing television cop Magnum in the extremely popular “Magnum P.I.” However, when he was offered the role of Indy he turned it down, so George Lucas went with the man he had just worked with on the “Star Wars” franchise – Harrison Ford.

Will Smith – Keanu Reeves has joked in the past that getting to play Neo in the sci-fi thriller “The Matrix” provided him with enough money to feed his family forever. But Mr. Reeves should consider himself extremely lucky for every having the opportunity to don the duster jacket and enter into the realm of the matrix, because he wasn’t Andy and Lana Wachowski’s first choice to play the role. The Wachowski’s first choice was Will Smith who had just completed work on his comedy television series “The Fresh Prince Of Bel Air” and was the toast of Hollywood after delivering great performances in blockbusters such as “Independence Day,” “Men In Black” and “Enemy Of The State.” Ironically, Smith ended up doing “Wild, Wild West” instead of “The Matrix” and as time has since told, that was the beginning of the fall of his career as far as critics were concerned.

Jack Nicholson – Okay, so ultimately it didn’t affect his acting career all that much, but how many people know that screen legend Jack Nicholson once turned down one of the most iconic screen roles of all time. Back in 1972 when director Francis Ford Coppola was putting together his cast for arguably one of the most famous films of all time, “The Godfather,” he originally approached Jack Nicholson about playing the role of Michael Corleone. Nicholson turned down the role and instead Coppola gave the role to a virtual unknown called Al Pacino who used the role to become a screen legend himself.

Matt Damon – Matt Damon may be one of the biggest stars on the planet so it’s a little weird to find out that the actor turned down two roles that could have helped him become an even bigger star. It seems Damon may have something against franchises because both film roles he turned down were roles in two of the biggest franchises of modern times. Firstly, Damon turned the lead role in James Cameron’s “Avatar,” which was feverishly snapped up by Australian Sam Worthington, and then went on to turn down the role of Harvey Dent in Christopher Nolan’s Batman epic “The Dark Knight.” Both films went on to become mega blockbusters at the box office; however, people should cut Damon a little slack as he turned down “Avatar” to do “The Bourne Ultimatum” and turned down “The Dark Knight” to do “Invictus,” so both his choices still kind of worked anyway.

Johnny Depp – Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” has become one of the most iconic films of all time and even back in 1986 you would have thought any actor would have jumped at the opportunity to work with director John Hughes. Hughes may have delivered great films like “Sixteen Candles,” “The Breakfast Club” and “Pretty In Pink” but that wasn’t enough to win over Johnny Depp who decided to pass when he was offered the role of Ferris Bueller in the comedy. True Depp seems to have landed on his feet since then so it ultimately wasn’t a bad decision, but it can still make film goers wonder what could have been. For the record, the role of Bueller ended up becoming a career defining role for Matthew Broderick.

As you can see actors say ‘no’ to a role normally because they have a good reason and thankfully not many live to regret it, although it is still a fairly funny daydream to wonder what Tom Selleck would have looked like playing Indy.

The Good The Bad The Ugly

This week Dave, Nick, Adam and Greg take a look at new release films Cloud Atlas, Side Effects, I Give It A Year, Save Your Legs!, The Imposter and The Paperboy. Plus they took an in depth look at all The Oscars wrap-up and have Part 1 of their look at the 2013 Alliance French Film Festival. This episode also features interview with Zac Efron, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Jude Law, Scott Burns, Channing Tatum, Rooney Mara, Minnie Driver, Dan Mazer, Rose Byrne, Rafe Spall, Anna Faris, Simon Baker, Stephen Merchant, Jason Flemying, Tom Hanks, Halle Berry, Jim Sturgess, James D’Arcy, Hugh Grant, Susan Sarandon, Ben Whishaw, Jim Broadbent, Keith David, Lana Wachowski and the cast of Housos vs Authority.

Also make sure you listen for your chance to win a copy of ‘Storm Surfers 3D’ on Blu-Ray thanks to Madman Entertainment.

Cloud Atlas

Summary: Lana and Andy Wachowski collaborate with Run Lola Run director Tom Tykwer to co-direct and adapt David Mitchell’s British Book Award-winning novel Cloud Atlas. Examining how the actions of individual lives impact one another in the past, present and future, CLOUD ATLAS explores the connectedness of life as one soul is shaped over centuries from a killer into a hero, and how a single act of kindness ripples across centuries to inspire a revolution in the distant future. Tom Hanks, Halle Berry, Jim Broadbent, Hugo Weaving Jim Sturgess, Ben Whishaw and Doona Bae each appear in multiple roles as the audience is transported across the ages from the 19th century South Pacific to a distant post-apocalyptic future.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 28th February, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA/Germany/Hong Kong/Singapore

Director: Tom Tykwer, Andy Wachowski, Lana Wachowski

Screenwriter: Tom Tykwer, Andy Wachowski, Lana Wachowski, David Mitchell (novel)

Cast: Doona Bae (Tilda/Megan’s Mom/Mexican Woman/Sonmi-451/Sonmi Prostitute), Halle Berry (Native Woman/Jocasta Ayrs/Luisa Rey/Indian Party Guest/Ovid/Meronym), Jim Broadbent (Captain Molyneux/Vyvyan Ayrs/Timothy Cavendish/Korean Musician/Prescient 2), James D’Arcy (Young Rufus Sixsmith/Old Rufus Sixsmith/Nurse James/Archivist), Keith David (Kupaka/Joe Napier/An-kor Apis/Prescient), Tanja de Wendt (Mrs. Hotchkiss), Louis Dempsey (Haskell Moore’s Dinner Guest 3/Jarvis Hoggins), Martin Docherty (Eddie Hoggins), Niall Greig Fulton (Haskell Moore’s Dinner Guest 2/Mozza Hoggins), Robert Fyfe (Old Salty Dog/Mr. Meeks/Prescient 1), Hugh Grant (Rev. Giles Horrox/Hotel Heavy/Lloyd Hooks/Denholme Cavendish/Seer Rhee/Kona Chief), David Gyasi (Autua/Lester Rey/Duophstye), Raevan Lee Hanan (Little Girl with Orison at Papa Song’s/Catkin/Zachry Relative 1), Tom Hanks (Dr. Henry Goose/Hotel Manager/Issac Sachs/Dermot Hoggins/Cavendish Look-a-like Actor/Zachry), Heikie Hanold-Lynch (Nurse Judd Look-a0like), Andrew Havill (Mr. Hotchkiss), Sylvestra Le Touzel (Nurse Judd), Brody Nicholas Lee (Javier Gomez/Jonas/Zachry’s Older Nephew), Robin Morrissey (Young Cavendish), Mya-Lecia Naylor (Miro), Gotz Otto (Groundsman Withers), Jeremy Paxman (himself), Alistair Petrie (Haskell Moore’s Dinner Guest 1/Musiciian/Felix Finch/Lascivious Businessman), Ralph Riach (Ernie), Jim Sturgess (Adam Ewing/Poor Hotel Guest/Megan’s Dad/Highlander/Hae-Joo Chang/Adam/Zachry Brother-In-Law), Susan Sarandon (Madame Horrox/Older Ursula/Yusouf Suleiman/Abbess), Victoria Esteban Sole (Mr. Roderick), Laura Vietzen (Young Ursula), Amanda Walker (Veronica), Hugo Weaving (Hakell Moore/Tadeusz Kesselring/Bill Smoke/Nurse Noakes/Boardman Mephi/Old Georgie), Ben Whishaw (Cabin Boy/Robert Frobisher/Store Clerk/Georgette/Tribesman), Martin Wutke (Mr. Boerhaave/Guard/Leary The Healer), Xun Zhou (Talbot/Hotel Manager/Yoona-939/Rose), Zhu Zhu (Megan Sixsmith/12th Star Clone)

Runtime: 172 mins

Classification:MA15+

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Cloud Atlas’ Review: Please check Dave’s review of ‘Cloud Atlas’ that is available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Cloud Atlas′: Check Episode #22 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Cloud Atlas’.

Rating: 3.5/5

IMDB Rating: Cloud Atlas (2012) on IMDb