Tagged: Neal Huff

 

Summary: A family that are led by a domineering father are put through a catastrophic series of events.

Year: 2019

Australian Cinema Release Date: 9th July 2020

Thailand Cinema Release Date: NA

Australian VOD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA, Canada

Director: Trey Edward Shults

Screenwriter: Trey Edward Shults

Cast: Joshua Brockington (Stan), Rueben E.A Brown (Wally), Sterling K. Brown (Ronald), Justin R. Chan (Chang), Clifton Collins Jnr. (Bobby), Alexa Demie (Alexis), Harlan Drum (Sophie), David Garelick (Ryan), Renee Elise Goldsberry (Catherine), Kelvin Harrison Jnr. (Tyler), Holland Hayes (Doctor Steve), Lucas Hedges (Luke), Neal Huff (Bill), Harmony Korine (Mr. Stanley), Taisha Perez (Coroner Jessie), Viva Pineda (Elena), Taylor Russell (Emily), Bill Wise (Coach Wise)

Running Time: 135 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia)

 

 

OUR WAVES REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths’ Waves Review:

One of the things I missed most during the cinema lockdowns was that feeling in the pit of your stomach when you discover a truly brilliant film for the first time. Yesterday, that feeling returned for me as I sat and watched Waves, a remarkable film that is made a masterpiece by a creative director, an amazing script and performances that deserve to be mentioned in the same breath as the word Oscars.

From filmmaker Trey Edward Shults (It Comes At Night) Waves chronicles life for a family led by dominating father, Ronald (Sterling K. Brown – Black Panther), as a chain of events occur that will change their lives forever.

Despite warnings from the family’s step-mother Catherine (Renee Elise Goldsberry – Hamilton) Ronald keeps pushing his teenage son Tyler (Kelvin Harrison Jnr – Monsters And Men) to succeed, especially when it comes to his High School wrestling career. But as Tyler struggles to keep going while obviously injured things start crashing down his life and flow on effect keeps on affecting everyone especially his girlfriend, Alexis (Alexa Demie – mid90s), and sister, Emily (Taylor Russell – Lost In Space).

There is a power to Waves that very few films in modern day cinema can match. With notable exceptions like Mud and The Perks Of Being a Wallflower a lot of coming-of-age films released over recent years have shied away from many of the hard-hitting topics that films like Kids or Bully did nearly two decades ago. To me that has always seemed like a weird notion seeing that the modern day teenager not only faces topics like sexuality and bullying plus a range of new vices and issues that the past generation could only dream about.

Unlike its contemporaries Waves doesn’t hold back and instead pushes the audience head-first into the world of a crumbling teenager that has moments that will leave them shocked to the core. Waves is like a spectacular yet beautiful car-crash. It hits hard and will affect all that watches it but at the same time you can’t look away from it.

One of the keys to Waves working for me was its unpredictability. Just as you think Shults’ plot-line is going one way he sharply, but realistically, takes it another way. As a story-teller Shults doesn’t sign-post key events during the film and the result is moments of true shock that the audience will never see coming.

Also adding to the experiences of watching Waves is Shults experimental style of changing the ratio of how the film appears on the screen depending on where we are in the family’s story. It seems a small gesture but you do notice it and it works to enhance the cinematic experience of the story rather than hindering it.

Rounding out what makes Waves one of the best films of 2020 are the performances from its cast. We haven’t had a clean sweep at the Oscars for awhile but if Sterling K.Brown, Taylor Russell, Kelvin Harrison Jnr and Lucas Hedges (Boy Erased) don’t get Oscar nominations for their performances here than a huge cinematic injustice has occurred. Their scenes together are delivered with pure emotion and the result is nothing short of phenomenal.

Waves is not just one of my favourite films of 2020 it was one of the best I have seen in the last decade. A sensational script, a creative director, a Trent Reznor soundtrack and a highly skilled cast lead to an explosion of brilliance that is not to be missed.

 

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:

 

 

IMDB Rating:

Waves (2019) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Waves Reviews:

Nil

 

Trailer:

Summary:Moonrise Kingdom is the new movie directed by two-time Academy Award-nominated filmmaker Wes Anderson. Set on an island off the coast of New England in the summer of 1965, Moonrise Kingdom tells the story of two 12-year olds who fall in love, make a secret pact, and run away together into the wilderness.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 30th August, 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: 26th December, 2012

Country: United States

Director: Wes Anderson

Screenwriter: Wes Anderson, Roman Coppola

Cast: Bob Balaban (The Narrator), Marianna Bassham (Becky), Liz Callahan (Mrs. Billingsley), Rob H. Campbell (Deluca), Seamus Davey-Fitzpatrick (Roosevelt), Hugo DeAscentis (Edgar), James Demler (Noah), Tanner Flood (Murray Bishop), L.J. Foley (Izod), Chandler Frantz (Gadge), Jared Gilman (Sam), Kara Hayward (Suy), Lucas Hedges (Redford), Neal Huff (Jed), Harvey Keitel (Commander Pierce), Charlie Kilgore (Lazy Eye), Frances McDormand (Laura Bishop), Bill Murray (Walt Bishop), Tommy Nelson (Nickleby), Edward Norton (Scout Master Ward), Carolyn Pickman (Mrs. Lynn), Dakota Pimentel (Acolyte), Larry Pine (Mr. Billingsley), Jean-Michael Pion ((Ham), Wyatt Raliff (Rudy Bishop), Gabriel Rush (Skotak), Jake Ryan (Lionel Bishop), Jason Schwartzman (Cousin Ben), Andreas Sheikh (Panagle), Tilda Swinton (Social Services), Bruce Willis (Captain Sharp)

Runtime: 93 mins

Classification:PG

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Moonrise Kingdom’ Review:

If you aren’t a fan of director Wes Anderson’s (Fantastic Mr. Fox, The Darjeeling Limited) work then there really isn’t much of a point watching Moonrise Kingdom as it sees Mr. Anderson delve even further into his absurd brand of humor and it works remarkably well.

Set on a New England island in the 1960s Moonrise Kingdom focuses on orphan, Sam (Jared Gilman – newcomer) who organizes a brave escape from his scout troop, led by Scout Master Ward ( Edward Norton – The Bourne Legacy, Stone), so he can spend time with his to-be-girlfriend, Suzy (Kara Hayward – newcomer).

While Sam and Suzy believe they can create their own little piece of paradise they are soon being hunted down by the scouts who are after revenge, as well as local Police Officer Captain Sharp (Bruce Willis – Fire With Fire, The Expendables 2), Social Services (Tilda Swinton – We Need To Talk About Kevin, The Chronicles Of Narnia: The Voyage Of The Dawn Treader) and Suzy’s loopy parents Walt (Bill Murray – Passion Play, Fantastic Mr. Fox) and Laura Bishop (Frances McDormand – Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted, Transformers: Dark Of The Moon).

Anderson really doesn’t hold back with the comedy. Whether it be a fake looking lame explosion or some incredibly witty dialogue he knows how to get his audience to laugh and it works throughout the film. The fact that is script follows a young Romeo + Juliet style couple involved in their own tragic romance only makes the audience fall in love even more with film.

At time the deadpan nature of the acting does jar a little, but if you’re a fan of Wes Anderson’s work then it is something that you have come to get used to over the years. To his credit Anderson also takes some remarkably risks with Moonrise Kingdom, the fact that his two leads, Jared Gilman and Kara Hayward, are both newcomers and therefore unknown to cinema audiences was a big call that could have massively backfired, but as luck would have it both deliver amazing performances and instead announce themselves as stars of the future.

As usual Anderson does get the best out of his cast. Bruce Willis seems to relish the fact that he gets to play a role that does demand some real dramatic acting while Bill Murray and Frances McDormand lap up the opportunity to play up the comedy with some real out-there characters. But the real stars of the show here are Edward Norton who constantly has the audience in hysterics and Jason Schwartzman (TV’S Bored To Death & Sesame Street) who may only have limited screen time but certainly makes the best of it.

The humor of Moonrise Kingdom may not appeal to all, but if you think it may then this is a film that is guaranteed to make you laugh until you cry.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of Moonrise Kingdom: http://www.helium.com/items/2363846-movie-reviews-moonrise-kingdom-2012.

Rating: 3.5/5 Stars

IMDB Rating:Moonrise Kingdom (2012) on IMDb

Meek's Cutoff

Summary: The year is 1845 and a wagon team of three families is setting off across the sparse terrain of the Oregon desert, in northwest USA. They are guided by mountain man Stephen Meek, who claims to know a short cut, but when they become lost in the dry rock and sage, their faith in their guide, and in each other, weakens. After days of wandering, suffering the hardships of the inhospitable landscape and unable to find water, a Native American wanderer crosses their path. The pioneers are torn between trusting their guide or a man who has always been seen as the enemy.

Year: 2010

Australian Cinema Release Date: 5th June, 2011

Australian DVD Release Date: 5th October, 2011

Country: USA

Director: Kelly Reichardt

Screenwriter: Jonathan Raymond

Cast: Paul Dano (Thomas Gately), Bruce Greenwood (Stephen Meek), Shirley Henderson (Glory White), Neal Huff (William White), Zoe Kazan (Millie Gately), Tommy Nelson (Jimmy White), Will Patton (Soloman Tetherow), Rod Rondeaux (The Indian), Michelle Williams (Emily Tetherow)

Runtime: 104 mins

Classification:PG

OUR REVIEWS/RATINGS OF ‘MEEK’S CUTOFF’:

David Griffiths: Stars(4)

Kelly Reichardt seems to have done something over the years that has upset those responsible for making sure she wins an Oscar because while it was disappointing that Wendy & Lucy didn’t get nominated it is an absolute crime that Meek’s Cutoff wasn’t. While this isn’t a film for the popcorn set it is a film that will be lapped up by real film lovers. It is a film that will actually make you think… now you can’t say that about much modern cinema, can you?

Meek’s Cutoff follows a group of settlers as they make their way across the harsh Oregon landscape in 1845. The group which is made up of Soloman Tetherow (Will Patton), his wife, Emily (Michelle Williams) as well as the Gately Family and the White Family is being led by Stephen Meek (Bruce Greenwood) who is supposed to be a great tracker, but seems to have got the group lost. As the continue to wander aimlessly through the un-inhabitated land the realisation that they could die of starvation or thirst becomes reality, while Meek continues to warn them that the only thing they have to fear is the savage Indian tribes that are ‘watching them’. The racist Meek then takes an Indian (Rod Rondeaux) captive which divides the group.

Those familiar with Reichardt’s style will know that she likes to use minimal dialogue in her films. She once again uses this in Meek’s Cutoff and it enhances the film a million times over. It truly gives the audience a real feel of the loneliness that the characters are going through, and while some audience members will be annoyed by her ‘slow-moving’ style scenes such as the opening scene can really only be described as pieces of cinematic brilliance that true film lovers will fall in love with instantly. It is work like this that show just how good of a director Kelly Reichardt really is.

Meek’s Cutoff is penned by Jonathan Raymond (the same screenwriter who wrote Reichardt’s brilliant Wendy And Lucy) and this is one combination that seems to be a marriage in heaven. Raymond’s fine script only enhances Reichardt’s film-making style even more and if it is true that Raymond used the politics of George Bush vs. Barack Obama as a basis for the storyline of this script then he really is a screenwriting genius… and if he didn’t well he should just shut-up and let people think that he did.

This film also once again reminds the world just good Michelle Williams is as an actress. Once again she puts in a faultless performance and it seems that since her Dawson’s Creek days she has continued to grow as an actress and never once put in a bad performance. Those critical of her acting should see her ‘stand-offs’ with Bruce Greenwood in Meek’s Cutoff because they are truly sensational.

Meek’s Cutoff shows that are still some creative films that can surface from the U.S. and only proves the fact that Kelly Reichardt is one of the most important filmmakers of our generation.

Greg King: Stars(2.5)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘Meek’s Cutoff’ that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Meek’s Cutoff′: This review of ‘Meek’s Cutoff’ by David Griffiths originally appeared in Buzz Magazine.

If you’re a fan of director, Kelly Reichardt (Wendy & Lucy, Old Joy) then you are sure to love her new offering Meek’s Cutoff. But like her past work it is hard to see Meek’s Cutoff being lapped up by the popcorn set, instead this is a movie for the film-connoisseur, and one that will be well-loved by those who consider themselves at Reichardt fan.

Meek’s Cutoff is set in Oregon in 1845 as a group of settlers make their away across the country in order to stake a ‘claim’. The group which is made up of Soloman Tetherow (Will Patton – Knucklehead, Waking Madison), his wife, Emily (Michelle Williams – Shutter Island, Blue Valentine) as well as the Gately Family and the White Family is being led by Stephen Meek (Bruce Greenwood – Super 8, TV’S Young Justice) who is supposed to be a great tracker, but seems to have got the group lost. The racist Meek then takes an Indian (Rod Rondeaux – TV’S Comanche Moon & Into The West) captive which divides the group.

Reichardt once again uses her familiar style of ‘very little dialogue but brilliant cinematography’ to get the very important message held in Meek’s Cutoff across to her audience, and this is one film that is really enhanced by her ‘slow-moving’ style. The opening scenes of a wagon crossing a river a brilliant, and only goes to show just how good Reichardt is as a director.

Reichardt’s skills are only enhanced by a terrific script by Jonathan Raymond (Wendy & Lucy, TV’S Mildred Pierce). If the rumours that Raymond uses a metaphor of George Bush vs. Barack Obama are true then he is a screenwriting genius… if they aren’t true then he can simply rest on the laurels of the fact that he has created an amazing film that once again gives actress, Michelle Williams a chance to show off her brilliant skills. Any of the scenes that she does here with Bruce Greenwood are truly sensational.

Meek’s Cutoff shows that are still some creative films that can surface from the U.S. and only proves the fact that Kelly Reichardt is one of the most important filmmakers of our generation.

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3)

IMDB Rating: Meek's Cutoff (2010) on IMDb

Trailer: