Tagged: Shawn Levy

It’s not a good day, it’s a great day, because Disney+ has confirmed that 20th Century Studios’ epic adventure comedy “Free Guy” will be available to stream from September 29, 2021 on Disney+ in Australia, under the Star banner. 

In “Free Guy,” a bank teller who discovers he is actually a background player in an open-world video game, decides to become the hero of his own story…one he rewrites himself. Now in a world where there are no limits, he is determined to be the guy who saves his world his way…before it is too late.

Starring Ryan Reynolds, Jodie Comer, Lil Rel Howery, Joe Keery, Utkarsh Ambudkar and Taika Waititi, “Free Guy” is directed by Shawn Levy from a screenplay by Matt Lieberman and Zak Penn and a story by Lieberman. The film is produced by Ryan Reynolds, p.g.a., Shawn Levy, p.g.a., Sarah Schechter, Greg Berlanti and Adam Kolbrenner with Mary McLaglen, Josh McLaglen, George Dewey, Dan Levine and Michael Riley McGrath serving as executive producers.

This Is Where I Leave You

Summary: A Jewish family that isn’t used to observing their faith’s traditions is forced to fulfill their father’s final wish and sit Shivah together and confront their problems.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 23rd October, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Shawn Levy

Screenwriter: Jonathan Tropper

Cast: Michael Barra (Ollie), Jason Bateman (Judd Altman), Barbara Bleier (Trish), Connie Britton (Tracy Sullivan), Carly Brooke (Chelsea), Rose Byrne (Penny Moore), Cantor Mia Fram Davidson (Cantor), Adam Driver (Phillip Altman), Oakes Fegley (Young Judd), Tina Fey (Wendy Altman), Jane Fonda (Hillary Altman), Michael Bryan French (Dr. Rausch), Kathryn Hahn (Annie Altman), Cade Lappin (Cole), Aaron Lazar (Barry Weissman), Beth Leavel (Renee), Debra Monk (Linda Callen), Olivia Oguma (Shelby), Timothy Olyphant (Hory Callen), Lance Roberts (Calvin), Ben Schwartz (Rabbi Charles Grodner (Boner)), Carolyn Seiff (Mrs. Applebaum), Dax Shepard (Wade Beaufort), Abigail Spencer (Quinn Altman), Cheryl Stern (Lois), Corey Stoll (Paul Altman), Will Swenson (Younger Mort), Gerry Vichi (Uncle Joe)

Runtime: 103 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR THIS IS WHERE I LEAVE YOU REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Greg King: You can check out Greg’s This Is Where I Leave You review on www.filmreviews.net.au

Stars(2.5)

 

David Griffiths:

Jason Bateman has been a bit of a comedic golden path just recently. It seems every comedy film that he has touched has turned to box office gold with the likes of Due Date and Horrible Bosses leading the way. But you can only wonder whether he has gone skidding of that path badly with This Is Where I Leave You a film that manages to pack together a stellar ensemble cast… but forgets that a film just can’t work if you overcrowd it with so many characters that people can’t keep track of who is who.

Based on the hit novel by Jonathan Tropper (who also pens the screenplay here) This Is Where I Leave You sees one of life’s losers Judd Altman’s (Jason Bateman) life take a turn for a new low, when he comes home from work to find his wife in bed with his egotistical boss, Wade (Dax Shepard).

Then life delivers another blow to Judd when he learns that his father has died. While at the funeral Judd and his siblings learn from their mother, Hillary (Jane Fonda) that their father’s dying wish was that they all turn back to their Jewish roots and return home to their mother for a week. So soon Judd, Wendy (Tina Fey), Phillip (Adam Driver) and Paul (Corey Stoll) are all back under the roof and digging up painful memories from the past that puts them all on edge. Judd is also faced with the new dilemma of does he finally decide to take a risk in his life and turn his back on his cheating wife and take a chance with his friend from High School Penny Moore (Rose Byrne).

On paper This Is Where I Leave You should be a brilliant film. The all star comedic cast should suggest that this film should glitter with comedy gold while the fact that it is based on a hit novel means the film should have a ready made audience. But perhaps the biggest problem here is that the novel has been adapted for the screen by the same man who penned the novel in the first place, a practice that never really works because an author treats his novel like a baby and never wants to cut a thing out of it. As a result This Is Where I Leave You is a film that has just too many characters and is packed absolutely full of subplots.

The result is an over-long film that loses its audience at times with scenes that don’t need to be there and flat spots that end up overshadowing the good comedic moments such as the boys smoking a joint in the synagogue causing mayhem to ensue. Then there are also the comedy moments that do nothing else but make you groan like Wade’s car being overturned by a bunch of steroid abusing idiots.

The other major problem with having so many characters piled into the film is that it means that no actor really ever gets a chance to shine. Jason Bateman just seems to breeze through this film with no effort whatsoever while people such as Rose Byrne and Connie Britton are completely wasted in roles that could have really been filled by nobodies.

Likewise the comedic skills of Jane Fonda and Tina Fey are completely stunted as the weak script rarely gives them a chance to impress or even get a chuckle out of their audience. Even Timothy Olyphant and Dax Shepard are in stunted roles while Adam Driver manages to buck the trend a little by bringing some skills to the table as he portrays the juvenile yet unhappy playboy, Phillip.

This Is Where I Leave You should have been an interesting comedic drama that explored the world of a family in turmoil. With the cast assembled it should have been a beautifully delivered character drama but all because of one weak script it ends up becoming a bit of a mess. The over indulgence of characters means that nobody ever gets a chance to shine while too many opportunities for a good laugh fall by the wayside. Sadly This Is Where I Leave You will be jotted down as one of the disappointments of 2014.

Stars(3)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3)

 

IMDB Rating: This Is Where I Leave You (2014) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Reviews of ‘This Is Where I Leave You′: For our full This Is Where I Leave You review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #102 . You can also check Dave’s This Is Where I Leave You review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

Disney

Disney has kicked off production on “Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day,” the first live-action film adaptation of Judith Viorst’s 1972 illustrated children’s classic. The film, directed by Independent Spirit Award-winner Miguel Arteta (“The Good Girl,” “Cedar Rapids,” “Youth in Revolt”) from a screenplay by Rob Lieber, is a 21 Laps Entertainment/Jim Henson Company production. Shooting in the Los Angeles area, with locations in the cities of Pasadena and Arcadia, the San Fernando Valley and Melody Ranch in Newhall, the film hits cinemas nationally in November, 2014.

Steve Carell (“The Way, Way Back,” “Little Miss Sunshine,” the forthcoming “Foxcatcher”) and Jennifer Garner (“Dallas Buyers Club, “The Odd Life of Timothy Green,” “Juno”) star as Alexander’s upbeat parents. The veteran performers are joined in the film by a trio of young talents that includes 16-year-old Dylan Minnette (“Lost,” the upcoming “Prisoners”) as Alexander’s older brother, Anthony; 15-year-old Kerris Dorsey (TV’s “Ray Donovan,” “Moneyball”) as sister Emily; and 12-year-old Australian native Ed Oxenbould (“Puberty Blues”), who makes his big-screen feature debut as the film’s title character, Alexander.

Emmy® winner (and Golden Globe® nominee) Megan Mullally (“Will & Grace”) also joins the cast, along with Jennifer Coolidge (“American Pie,” “Legally Blonde,” TV’s “2 Broke Girls”) and Bella Thorne (“Shake It Up!”).

The film is produced by Shawn Levy (“Night at the Museum,” “Date Night,” “Real Steel”), Emmy® nominee and CEO of the Jim Henson Company Lisa Henson, and 21 Laps Entertainment President Dan Levine (“The Internship,” “Along Came Polly,” “Freedom Writers”). It’s executive produced by industry veteran Philip Steuer (“Saving Mr. Banks,” “Oz The Great and Powerful,” “The Chronicles of Narnia” trilogy) and Jason Lust (“Whip It,” “The Waiting Game”).

Disney’s “Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day” follows the exploits of 11-year-old Alexander as he experiences the most terrible and horrible day of his young life—a day that begins with gum stuck in his hair, followed by one calamity after another. But when Alexander tells his upbeat family about the misadventures of his disastrous day, he finds little sympathy and begins to wonder if bad things only happen to him. He soon learns that he’s not alone when his brother, sister, mom and dad all find themselves living through their own terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day. Anyone who says there is no such thing as a bad day just hasn’t had one.

Director Arteta’s key filmmaking team includes cinematographer Terry Stacey (“50/50,” “Salmon Fishing in the Yemen”), two-time Oscar®-nominated production designer Michael Corenblith (“The Blind Side,” “Saving Mr. Banks,” HBO’s “Game Change”), and two artists with whom he has previously collaborated: Oscar-nominated film editor Pam Martin (“The Fighter,” “Little Miss Sunshine,” “Youth in Revolt”) and veteran costume designer Nancy Steiner (“Little Miss Sunshine,” “Lost in Translation,” “The Good Girl,” “Youth in Revolt”).

“Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day,” published in 1972, was written by Judith Viorst and illustrated by Ray Cruz. The endearing, enduring classic (with more than 2 million copies in print) became an ALA Notable Children’s Book while also winning a George G. Stone Center Recognition of Merit, a Georgia Children’s Book Award, and distinction as a Reading Rainbow book. Viorst followed this book (inspired by her own three sons’ childhoods—Alexander, Anthony and Nicholas) with two sequels: “Alexander, Who Used to be Rich Last Sunday” (1978) and “Alexander, Who’s Not (Do You Hear Me? I Mean It!) Going to Move” (1995). The 1972 original was first adapted to the small screen as a half-hour HBO animated musical in 1990 before Viorst collaborated with composers Charles Strouse (music) and Shelley Markham (musical score) for a 1998 stage musical at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C.

The Internship

Summary: Billy (Vince Vaughn) and Nick (Owen Wilson) are salesmen whose careers have been torpedoed by the digital world. Trying to prove they are not obsolete, they defy the odds by talking their way into a coveted internship at Google, along with a battalion of brilliant college students. But, gaining entrance to this utopia is only half the battle. Now they must compete with a group of the nation’s most elite, tech-savvy geniuses to prove that necessity really is the mother of re-invention.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 13th June, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Shawn Levy

Screenwriter: Vince Vaughn, Jared Stern

Cast: Bruno Amato (Sal), Eric Andre (Sid), Molly Brady (Waitress Jennifer), Josh Brener (Lyle), Rose Byrne (Dana), Mickey Cole Jnr. (Marty), Anna Enger (Eleanor), Will Ferrell (Sleaze), Josh Gad (Headphones), John Goodman (Dodgy Boss), Sean Goudling (Snitch), Harvey Guillen (Zach), Ashley Heath (Jeanie), Linda ‘Lil’ Johnston (Lorraine), Martha B. Knighton (Rose), Michael D. Layden (8 Year Old Nick), Aasif Mandvi (Mr. Chetty), Max Minghella (Graham Hawtrey), Jarion Monroe (Not Professor X), Dylan O’Brien (Stuart), Jimmy Ouyang (Wa Zao), Tobit Raphael (Yo-Yo Santos), Rob Riggle (Randy), Tiya Sircar (Neha), Zane Stephens (Frankie), JoAnna Garcia Swisher (Megan), Jessica Szohr (Marielena), Vince Vaughn (Billy McMahon), Gary Anthony Williams (Bob Williams), Callan Wilson (Cole), Owen Wilson (Nick Campbell)

Runtime: 119 mins

Classification:M

SUBCULTURE MEDIA/THE GOOD THE BAD THE UGLY FILM SHOW REVIEWS/RATINGS OF ‘THE INTERNSHIP’:

David Griffiths: Stars(3.5)

Please check Dave’s review of ‘The Internship’ that is available on The Helium Entertainment Channel

Greg King: Stars(3)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘The Internship’ that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

Nick Gardener: Stars(2)

Please check Nick’s review of ‘The Internship’ that is available on The Good The Bad The Ugly Episode 36

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3)

IMDB Rating:  The Internship (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘The Internship′: Please check episode #36 of The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show for more reviews of ‘The Internship’.

Trailer: