Tagged: Shirley Henderson

Summary: The surviving members of the resistance face the First Order once again, and the legendary conflict between the Jedi and the Sith reaches its peak bringing the Skywalker saga to its end.

Year: 2020

Australian Cinema Release Date: 19th December 2019

Thailand Cinema Release Date: 19th December 2019

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: J.J.Abrams

Screenwriter: J.J. Abrams, Chris Terrio

Cast: Gerald W Abrams (Captain Cypress), J.J. Abrams (D-O (voice)), Naomi Ackie (Jannah), Josef Altin (Pilot Vanik), John Boyega (Finn), Lynn Robertson Bruce (D-O/Sith Alchamist), Dave Chapman (BB-8), Hayden Christensen (Anakin Skywalker (voice)), Richard Coombs (Maz Kanata), Aidan Cook (Boolio), Liam Cook (Ochi of Bestoon), Olivia d’Abo (Luminara Unduli (voice)), Anthony Daniels (c-3PO), Harrison Davis (Pommet Warrick), Warwick Davis (Wicket W. Warrick), Matt Denton (Maz Kanata), Mandeep Dhillon (Lieutenant Garam), Adam Driver (Kylo Ren), Ashley Eckstein (Ahsoka Tano (voice)), Amir El-Masry (Commander Track), Carrie Fisher (Leia Organa (archival footage)), Cailey Fleming (Young Rey), Harrison Ford (Han Solo), Geff Francis (Admiral Griss), Domhnall Gleeson (General Hux), Richard E. Grant (General Pryde), Greg Grunberg (Snap Wexley), Alec Guiness (Obi Wan Kenobi (voice)), Robin Guiver (D-O), Amanda Hale (Officer Kandia), Jennifer Hale (Aayla Secura (voice)), Mark Hamill (Luke Skywalker), Claire Roi Harvey (Maz Kanata), Shirley Henderson (Babu Frik (voice)), Carolyn Hennesy (Demine Lithe), Brian Herring (BB-8), Oscar Isaac (Poe Dameron), Josefine Irrera Jackson (Young Rey), Samuel L. Jackson (Mace Windu (voice)), James Earl Jones (Darth Vader (voice)), Paul Kasey (Cai Threnalli), Nick Kellington (Klaud), Diana Kent (General Engell), Amanda Lawrence (Commander D’Arcy), Denis Lawson (Wedge Antilles), Billie Lourd (Lieutenant Connix), Ian McDiarmid (Emperor Palpatine), Ewan McGregor (Obi Wan Kenobi (voice)),  Dominic Monaghan (Beaumont),  Tanya Moodie (General Parnadee), Liam Neeson (Qui-Gon Jinn (voice)), Lupita Nyong’o (Maz Kanata), Frank Oz (Yoda (voice)), Simon Paisley Day (General Quinn), Angelique Perrin (Adi Gallia (voice)), Freddie Prinze Jnr. (Kana Jarrus (voice)), Mike Quinn (Nien Nunb), Daisy Ridley (Rey), Vinette Robinson (Pilot Tyce), Alison Rose (Lieutenant Draper), Kipsang Rotich (Nien Nunb (voice)), Keri Russell (Zorii Bliss), Philica Saunders (Tabala Zo), Andy Serkis (Snoke (voice)), Kiran Shah (Nambi Ghima), Joonas Suotamo (Chewbacca), Hassan Taj (R2-D2), Chris Terrio (Colonel Aftab Ackbar (voice)), Lee Towersey (R2-D2), Kelly Marie Tran (Rose Tico), Billy Dee Williams (Lando Calrissian), John Williams (Oma Tres), Patrick Williams (Boolio (voice)), Debra Wilson (Nambi Ghima (voice)), Tom Wilton (Colonel Aftab Ackbar), Matthew Wood (Cai Threnally (voice))

Running Time: 142 mins

Classification: M (Australia) TBC (Thailand)

 

 

OUR STAR WARS: RISE OF SKYWALKER REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths Review:

It has taken forty-two years to get there, but finally the Skywalker saga is drawing to a close. No other cinematic franchise has ever reached the massive heights that Star Wars has and to say that this is a beloved series is under-selling it in a very big way. It is for that reason that J.J. Abrams has had one of the most difficult jobs that any filmmaker could ever dream of, it is up to him to close this much loved chapter in the Star Wars story in a way that will please a legion of fans world-wide.

Leading into Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker that story had been thrown into turmoil both on and off the screen. On screen we saw the death of Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) and the apparent return of Emperor Palpatine (Ian McDiarmid). Off screen all Star Wars fans were rocked with the tragic death of actress Carrie Fisher which they knew would impact the storyline of the final film.

Abrams doesn’t leave fans waiting with The Rise Of Skywalker very quickly getting down to business. Kylo Ren (Adam Driver) is on the hunt for Palpatine, while Finn (John Boyega), Poe (Oscar Isaac) and Chewbacca (Joonas Suotamo) search for an artefact that will allow Rey (Daisy Ridley) to face Palpatine, while they try to stop the massive First Order forces who are ready to once again take over the universe.

The plot maybe simple but certainly does not fail to entertain. Early on the film feels episodic simply moving from one story to another in a specific order but once it breaks those shackles the film mirrors the energy and entertainment that we all come to love from the original Star Wars films. But while the film does entertain it also does have its flaws. With the plot having so much going on there are times when it feels like it doesn’t spend enough time raising the levels of suspense, something that is very surprising considering that some of the lives in danger here are some of the most loved characters in cinematic history.

Still for the most of the part of the film Abrams keeps things simple but effective. Once it established that all characters could meet their end this time around that goes some way to keeping the audience on their toes while the final epic battle is something that true Star Wars fans have dreamt of for a long time. Unlike a lot of franchises this chapter does close with a finale that will leave fans happy and is should be noted that Disney does leave the door slightly ajar if they ever wish to continue the saga.

What makes this instalment so enjoyable though is the acting, and that is not something we have been able to say about every Star Wars instalment. Adam Driver shows in this film why he is one of the best actors in Hollywood at the moment. It is obvious that he doesn’t move into a lower acting gear because he is in an epic blockbuster here, instead he puts as much drama and emotion into his Marriage Story and Paterson… the former role which is talked about possibly earning him an Oscar nomination.

Driver is well matched on screen by Daisy Ridley whose acting prowess has continued to grow throughout this trilogy. Johy Boyega  and Oscar Isaac also deliver their goods but at the end of the day this film is literally Driver versus Ridley and that shows right up to the last amazing and memorable crescendo.

Star Wars: The Rise Of Skywalker is a film that is going to be embraced by the hardened Star Wars fans out there, something we can breathe a sigh of relief over since the disappointment of the Game Of Thrones finale. The Rise Of Skywalker is light but thoroughly entertains.

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:

 

 

IMDB Rating:  Star Wars: Episode IX - The Rise of Skywalker (2019) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Star Wars: The Rise Of Skywalker Reviews:

Our Stars Wars: The Rise Of Skywalker review that appeared in ‘The Phuket News’ can be read at this link – https://www.thephuketnews.com/rise-of-the-skywalker-will-give-you-palpatations-74177.php

Trailer:

Summary: After 20 years abroad, Mark Renton returns to Scotland and reunites with his old friends Sick Boy, Spud, and Begbie.

Year: 2017

Australian Cinema Release Date: 31st March 2017

Australian DVD Release Date: 14th June 2017

Country: United Kingdom

Director: Danny Boyle

Screenwriter: John Hodge, Irvine Welsh (novels)

Cast: John Bell (Spud aged 20), George Best (himself), Ewen Bremner (Spud), Robert Carlyle (Begbie/Begbie’s Father), Christopher Douglas (Chris The Oracle), Kyle Fitzpatrick (Fergus), Logan Gillies (Simon aged 9), Scott Greenan (Frank Jnr.), Aidan Haggarty (Spud aged 9), Hamish Haggerty (Young Renton), Charlie Hardie (Fergus aged 9), Shirley Henderson (Gail), Daniel Jackson (Young Begbie), John Kazek (Tom), Gordon Kennedy (Tulloch),  Elik Kish (Dozo), Devon Lamb (Baby Dawn), Lauren Lamb (Baby Dawn), Pauline Lynch (Lizzy), Thierry Mabonga (Security Officer Wilson), Kelly Macdonald (Diane),  James McElvar (Simon aged 20), Connor McIndoe (Renton aged 20), Ewan McGregor (Renton), Kevin McKidd (Tommy), Jonny Lee Miller (Simon), Christopher Mullen (Begbie aged 20), Anjela Nedyalkova (Veronika), Steven Robertson (Stoddart), Michael Shaw (Tommy aged 20), Ben Skelton (Renton aged 9), Daniel Smith (Begbie aged 9), Pauline Turner (June), Tom Urie (Big Bear), Bradley Welsh (Doyle), Irvine Welsh (Mikey Forrester), Elijah Wolf (Tommy aged 9)

Running Time: 117 mins

Classification: R

 

OUR T2 TRAINSPOTTING REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Kyle McGrath’s T2 Trainspotting Review:

Over the last 10 years we’ve seen many “long time later” sequels. They’re often comedies which fall flat like Anchorman 2, Zoolander 2 or Bad Santa 2. Only earlier this week we had “XxX: The Return of Xander Cage” 12 years after the previous film in the franchise. These movies usually fail relying too much on decade old references or nostalgia alone. Rarely do we see long time later sequels to films which aren’t action or comedy which is a pity because I think it’s in these other stories where the passage of time could be much more relevant.

“T2: Trainspotting” is the 20 year later follow up to the 1996 cult hit Trainspotting. When we left Renton (Ewan McGregor) he had betrayed his so called friends Sick Boy (Johnny Lee Miller), Spud (Ewen Bremner) & the psychotic Begbie (Robert Carlyle). He had stollen the £16,000 they had just made from a drug deal he was forced into and aimed to finally remove himself from the environment which led to his heroin addiction and would consume him otherwise. Years later pushing 50 and with nowhere else to call home he has returned to make amends with his less psychotic friends and try to find some semblance of a life to live. Coincidentally Begbie has just escaped from prison and is looking to do the same, it’s only a matter of time before his 20 year grudge against Renton catches up to him.
It was several years after its release that I was finally able to watch the original Trainspotting, I do remember some of the controversy surrounding it however. It was inevitably seen by some as glamorising heroin addiction which was of course ridiculous while at the same time it wasn’t on the level of some anti-drug PSA. To me the film was more about the toxic environment which Renton inhabited than the addiction itself. The film’s most pitiful characters were those who were total slaves to their addiction while the most repulsive character in the entire story was undoubtedly Begbie who would never touch the stuff.
This new film again rather than focusing really at all on drug addiction deals more with themes of midlife crisis and a feeling of lack of achievement. The original movie (and I’ll be referring back to the original film a lot this sequel being so tied to it as it is) ended with Renton “choosing life” and possibly being able to lead a fulfilling life finally escaping the culture which was holding him down. T2 is more about the idea of what if he didn’t go on to great things? If he was middle aged and had nothing to show for it with 30-40 more years to live, what would he do with them. To say nothing of junkie Spud, pimp & blackmailing Sick Boy and the infamous Begbie dealing with similar mid life crises of their own.
It’s an interesting direction to take the story and coming back to see these characters who we remember from 2 decades ago in a completely different light really makes the movie. The movie is in a unique position to evoke legitimate feelings of nostalgia from the audience familiar with its predecessor. Something which similarly made Toy Story 3 so beloved, VERY different of a movie as that may be.
The film’s biggest problem however also stems from the time which has passed and the success of the original movie. Trainspotting really is a classic. It’s soundtrack was amazing and there was something just so real and organic about it. The actor’s chemistry with each other and Danny Boyle’s vision and style made it the cult classic it is today and was instrumental in skyrocketing almost everyone involved to stardom.
This film by comparison feels very Hollywood. It no longer has that same fresh feeling and generally seems far to much like a studio product. The comedy for example in the original was much more situational and natural, here it’s almost always: set up, punchline, pause for laughter. A bar fight between Sick Boy & Renton upon their reunion takes time out to pause and focus on an old man they’re fighting around who’s completely nonplused by the whole event. It’s a very “isn’t this funny?” moment.
Another would be Renton’s “choose life” monologue. In the original film it’s the opening and closing voice over from an omnipotent narrator. In this film it’s brought up awkwardly and somebody asks him to explain it over dinner. He then gives the same type of speech only in dialogue this time and not at one point does it feel like anything natural, made worse by the fact it’s obviously been redubbed by McGregor later on for whatever reason. These are just examples but it’s representative of how forced and scripted the whole thing felt at times.
I think like Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull the problem is even if you largely have the same crew working on your film. (Same actors, same writer, same director) the issue is that those people may be very different filmmakers than they were 20 years ago. Danny Boyle is a veteran filmmaker and Oscar winner now so the film doesn’t have that independent, rough feel of 2 decades ago.
The actors are another issue. While it seems pedantic it was hard to see them in the same believable light that I did in the first movie due to their immense success. They were unknowns in 1996, now Renton is Obi Wan Kenobi, Sick Boy stars on American television as Sherlock Holmes in Elementary and Begbie was a Bond villain. While the actors still have great chemistry it was hard to see it as believable that they’d had 20 years of doing nothing when in reality they’ve almost all had 20 years of incredible successful careers as actors perhaps with the exception of Ewen Bremner which is probably why he was most believable in the role.
Again I know “it’s called acting” but there’s a reason Mickey Rourke worked so well in The Wrestler, Eminem was amazing in 8 Mile or Michael Keaton was perfect casting for Birdman. Cast Tom Hanks in the role of an out of work actor and see how believable it is.
T2 Trainspotting is definitely better than almost every other long term sequel of recent memory and we’re not likely to see many other films like this. Sadly though it’s far from living up to being as iconic as the original film in any way and feels more like something which could have been a short movie rather than a feature film.  Still I think it’s a movie for fans alone as it doesn’t really have much going for it otherwise to make it stand up on its own.

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:  

 

 

IMDB Rating:  T2 Trainspotting (2017) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment T2 Trainspotting Reviews: N/A

 

Trailer:

The Look Of Love

Summary: Welcome to the scandalous world of Paul Raymond, entrepreneur, impresario, and the “King of Soho.”

Seeing mediocrity in the seedy sex parlours of London, Raymond unveils his first “gentlemen’s club” in 1958 and gradually builds an empire of clubs and erotic magazines that brings him vast wealth while affronting British sexual mores. It also brings a litany of obscenity charges, a failed marriage, troubled children, and personal tragedy.

Based on the true story of the rise of Britain’s most notorious club owner and real estate developer on his journey to become the UK’s richest man.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 27th June, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA, UK

Director: Michael Winterbottom

Screenwriter: Matt Greenhalgh

Cast: Chris Addison (Tony Power), Chloe Arrowsmith (Chloe), Millicent Banks (Tilly), Matthew Beard (Howard Raymond), Emily Berrington (Clare), Simon Bird (Jonathan Hodge), Liam Boyle (Derry), Lisa Byrne (Claire), Holly Cofield (Honey), Karen Cogan (Laura), Steve Coogan (Paul Raymond), Tamsin Egerton (Fiona Richmond/Amber), Vera Filatova (Monika), Jensen Freeman (Jonathan), Anna Friel (Jean Raymond), Stephen Fry (Barrister), Martha Grace (Sarah), Jody Lee Harris (Kay), Shirley Henderson (Rusty Humphries), Frans Isotalo (Club Manager Franz), Annette Kellow (Starla), Ethan J. Knight (Cousin John), James Lance (Carl Snitcher), Hannah Lederer (Kate), Chris Lee (Chris), Jeff Longford (Jeff), Matt Lucas (Divine), Paul Matthews (Paul), Annabel Norbury (Barbara Lovell), Kieran O’Brien (Jimmy Humphries), Kent Oleson (Leonard), Mike Parish (himself), Freya Parsons (Miss Tree), Imogen Poots (Debbie Raymond), Betsy Rose (Betsy), Sarine Sofair (Yvonne), Sarah Solemani (Anna), Tom Stuart (Ainslie Tree), Zara Symes (Marlene), Cystal Van Lloy (Tina), David Walliams (Vicar Edwyn Young), Paul Willetts (Lord Longford)

Runtime: 101 mins

Classification:MA15+

SUBCULTURE MEDIA/THE GOOD THE BAD THE UGLY FILM SHOW REVIEWS/RATINGS OF ‘THE LOOK OF LOVE’:

Greg King: Stars(2.5)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘The Look Of Love’ that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

Nick Gardener: Stars(3.5)

Please check Nick’s review of ‘The Look Of Love’ that is available on the Built For Speed website

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3)

IMDB Rating:  The Look of Love (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘The Look Of Love′: Please check Episode #38 of The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show for more reviews of ‘The Look Of Love’.

Trailer:

Meek's Cutoff

Summary: The year is 1845 and a wagon team of three families is setting off across the sparse terrain of the Oregon desert, in northwest USA. They are guided by mountain man Stephen Meek, who claims to know a short cut, but when they become lost in the dry rock and sage, their faith in their guide, and in each other, weakens. After days of wandering, suffering the hardships of the inhospitable landscape and unable to find water, a Native American wanderer crosses their path. The pioneers are torn between trusting their guide or a man who has always been seen as the enemy.

Year: 2010

Australian Cinema Release Date: 5th June, 2011

Australian DVD Release Date: 5th October, 2011

Country: USA

Director: Kelly Reichardt

Screenwriter: Jonathan Raymond

Cast: Paul Dano (Thomas Gately), Bruce Greenwood (Stephen Meek), Shirley Henderson (Glory White), Neal Huff (William White), Zoe Kazan (Millie Gately), Tommy Nelson (Jimmy White), Will Patton (Soloman Tetherow), Rod Rondeaux (The Indian), Michelle Williams (Emily Tetherow)

Runtime: 104 mins

Classification:PG

OUR REVIEWS/RATINGS OF ‘MEEK’S CUTOFF’:

David Griffiths: Stars(4)

Kelly Reichardt seems to have done something over the years that has upset those responsible for making sure she wins an Oscar because while it was disappointing that Wendy & Lucy didn’t get nominated it is an absolute crime that Meek’s Cutoff wasn’t. While this isn’t a film for the popcorn set it is a film that will be lapped up by real film lovers. It is a film that will actually make you think… now you can’t say that about much modern cinema, can you?

Meek’s Cutoff follows a group of settlers as they make their way across the harsh Oregon landscape in 1845. The group which is made up of Soloman Tetherow (Will Patton), his wife, Emily (Michelle Williams) as well as the Gately Family and the White Family is being led by Stephen Meek (Bruce Greenwood) who is supposed to be a great tracker, but seems to have got the group lost. As the continue to wander aimlessly through the un-inhabitated land the realisation that they could die of starvation or thirst becomes reality, while Meek continues to warn them that the only thing they have to fear is the savage Indian tribes that are ‘watching them’. The racist Meek then takes an Indian (Rod Rondeaux) captive which divides the group.

Those familiar with Reichardt’s style will know that she likes to use minimal dialogue in her films. She once again uses this in Meek’s Cutoff and it enhances the film a million times over. It truly gives the audience a real feel of the loneliness that the characters are going through, and while some audience members will be annoyed by her ‘slow-moving’ style scenes such as the opening scene can really only be described as pieces of cinematic brilliance that true film lovers will fall in love with instantly. It is work like this that show just how good of a director Kelly Reichardt really is.

Meek’s Cutoff is penned by Jonathan Raymond (the same screenwriter who wrote Reichardt’s brilliant Wendy And Lucy) and this is one combination that seems to be a marriage in heaven. Raymond’s fine script only enhances Reichardt’s film-making style even more and if it is true that Raymond used the politics of George Bush vs. Barack Obama as a basis for the storyline of this script then he really is a screenwriting genius… and if he didn’t well he should just shut-up and let people think that he did.

This film also once again reminds the world just good Michelle Williams is as an actress. Once again she puts in a faultless performance and it seems that since her Dawson’s Creek days she has continued to grow as an actress and never once put in a bad performance. Those critical of her acting should see her ‘stand-offs’ with Bruce Greenwood in Meek’s Cutoff because they are truly sensational.

Meek’s Cutoff shows that are still some creative films that can surface from the U.S. and only proves the fact that Kelly Reichardt is one of the most important filmmakers of our generation.

Greg King: Stars(2.5)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘Meek’s Cutoff’ that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Meek’s Cutoff′: This review of ‘Meek’s Cutoff’ by David Griffiths originally appeared in Buzz Magazine.

If you’re a fan of director, Kelly Reichardt (Wendy & Lucy, Old Joy) then you are sure to love her new offering Meek’s Cutoff. But like her past work it is hard to see Meek’s Cutoff being lapped up by the popcorn set, instead this is a movie for the film-connoisseur, and one that will be well-loved by those who consider themselves at Reichardt fan.

Meek’s Cutoff is set in Oregon in 1845 as a group of settlers make their away across the country in order to stake a ‘claim’. The group which is made up of Soloman Tetherow (Will Patton – Knucklehead, Waking Madison), his wife, Emily (Michelle Williams – Shutter Island, Blue Valentine) as well as the Gately Family and the White Family is being led by Stephen Meek (Bruce Greenwood – Super 8, TV’S Young Justice) who is supposed to be a great tracker, but seems to have got the group lost. The racist Meek then takes an Indian (Rod Rondeaux – TV’S Comanche Moon & Into The West) captive which divides the group.

Reichardt once again uses her familiar style of ‘very little dialogue but brilliant cinematography’ to get the very important message held in Meek’s Cutoff across to her audience, and this is one film that is really enhanced by her ‘slow-moving’ style. The opening scenes of a wagon crossing a river a brilliant, and only goes to show just how good Reichardt is as a director.

Reichardt’s skills are only enhanced by a terrific script by Jonathan Raymond (Wendy & Lucy, TV’S Mildred Pierce). If the rumours that Raymond uses a metaphor of George Bush vs. Barack Obama are true then he is a screenwriting genius… if they aren’t true then he can simply rest on the laurels of the fact that he has created an amazing film that once again gives actress, Michelle Williams a chance to show off her brilliant skills. Any of the scenes that she does here with Bruce Greenwood are truly sensational.

Meek’s Cutoff shows that are still some creative films that can surface from the U.S. and only proves the fact that Kelly Reichardt is one of the most important filmmakers of our generation.

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3)

IMDB Rating: Meek's Cutoff (2010) on IMDb

Trailer: