Tagged: Timothy Olyphant

Mother's Day

Summary: As Mother’s Day rapidly approaches various people find themselves going through different stages of life. Sandy (Jennifer Aniston) finds that her ex-husband’s suprise is nothing like she expected, Miranda (Julia Roberts) decides to keep impressing her fans and ignore the fact the day is near, Jesse (Kate Hudson) and Gabi (Sarah Chalke) find themselves having to hide their lives from their parents, Bradley (Jason Sudeikis) prepares to help his daughters through their first Mother’s Day after the death of their mother while Kristin (Britt Robertson) finds it impossible to accept Zack’s (Jack Whitehall) marriage proposal as she heads into her first Mother’s Day.

Year: 2016

Australian Cinema Release Date: 28th April 2016

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Garry Marshall

Screenwriter: Tom Hines, Lily Hollander, Anya Kochoff, Matthew Walker

Cast: Jennifer Aniston (Sandy), Ella Anderson (Vicky), Brittany Belt (Beth Anne), Ayden Bivek (Tanner), Charly Briggs (Baby Katie Zim), Remy Briggs (Baby Katie Zim), Caleb Brown (Mikey), Joseph Leo Bwarie (Principal Bobby Lee), Jesse Case (Rachel), Sarah Chalke (Gabi), Hector Elizondo (Lance Wallace), Cameron Esposito (Max), Adam Freeman (HSN Host Adam Freeman), Gary Friedkin (Shorty), Jennifer Garner (2nd Lt. Dana Barton), Lisa Roberts Gillian (Assistant Betty), Adreana Gonzalez (Publicist Inez), Suzanne Haring (Bella the Balloon Lady), Tom Hines (Brady), Kate Hudson (Jesse), Mia Jackson (herself), Genevieve Joy (herself), Beth Kennedy (Gwenda), Siena LaGambina (Paige), Kate Linder (Dog Walker Gigi), Loni Love (Kimberly), Jon Lovitz (Wally Burn), Natalie Machado (Soccer Referee Lisa), Aasif Mandvi (Russell), Penny Marshall (Narrator), Sam Marshall (Sam), Margo Martindale (Flo), Drew Matthews (Beanzie), Shay Mitchell (Tina), Ariana Neal (Evette), Anoush NeVart (Sonia), Timothy Olyphant (Henry), Robert Pine (Earl), Julia Roberts (Miranda), Britt Robertson (Kristin), Graydon Russell (Tommy), Gianna Simone (Val), Brandon Spink (Peter), Jason Sudeikis (Bradley), Sandra Taylor (Lexy), Owen Vaccaro (Charlie), Paul Vogt (Tiny), Matthew Walker (Randy The Clown), Lucy Walsh (Jody), David Wedil (Dog Walker Leah), Jack Whitehall (Zack)

Runtime: 118 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR MOTHER’S DAY REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

Over the past few years Garry Marshall’s movies haven’t always been easy to watch. The man who once brought as classic television shows like Happy Days and The Odd Couple has turned to a lazy style of filmmaking which has seen him use the quantity of stars to get people into the cinema rather than the quality of the film. The result has been films like New Year’s Eve and Valentine’s Day which while have had star power but haven’t exactly been the most captivating films to watch.

It was because of that style of filmmaking that has meant that Mother’s Day has virtually been released in Australia with very little fanfare at all, a surprise when you realise that it stars three regular box office winners – Jennifer Aniston (We’re The Millers), Julia Roberts (Pretty Woman) and Kate Hudson (Almost Famous). If you are one of those people that have been a little bit worried about going to see Mother’s Day you can relax because this is one of Marshall’s better modern day films.

The film centres around a number of characters as Mother’s Day rapidly approaches. There is Jesse (Kate Hudson) and her sister Gabi (Sarah Chalke – Scrubs) who haven’t seen their parents in years because of their secret lives they know that their parents would not approve them. There is also Sandy (Jennifer Aniston) who is left reeling after she discovers that her ex-husband (Timothy Olyphant – Hitman) has just re-married the much younger Tina (Shay Mitchell – Pretty Little Liars) which means her children know have a second mother. Then there is Bradley (Jason Sudeikis – Horrible Bosses) who has been left trying to bring up his daughters after the death of his mother while Zack (Jack Whitehall – Fresh Meat) struggles to comprehend why the mother of his daughter, Kristin (Britt Robertson – The Longest Ride) refuses to marry him. Last but not least there is Miranda (Julia Roberts), the television show host that brings the ensemble all together.

After watching Mother’s Day i found myself sitting down and going over the film like a crime scene. Why did Mother’s Day work so well when Marshall’s previous films have been such lame ducks. The first thing I realised was the fact that Mother’s Day seems to flow a lot smoother than the previously mentioned films. Some of the links between characters in the other films have been pretty lame where as in Mother’s Day the relationships are not only believable but help the film’s storyline to move along rather than get in the way of it.

There also seems to be a lot more heart and humor in the film this time around which in the end makes the whole film seem a whole lot more realistic. While the story revolving around Bradley might not be as well presented as the similar story in Steve Carrell’s Dan In Real Life Sudeikis does manage to mix comedy with some truly emotional scenes. Likewise Sarah Chalke and Kate Hudson brilliantly portray two sisters sadly forced to live secret lives despite the fact they live in modern times. Like Sudeikis the two manage to amazingly combine comedy with some scenes that are powerful enough to really upset anybody who has had similar things happen in their lives.

Perhaps the biggest breath of fresh air in Mother’s Day are the acting performances of Britt Robertson and Jack Whitehall. Whitehall largely comes from a comedy background and while he plays a stand-up comedian in Mother’s Day he shows a new side to his talents by also expertly portraying a lot of the more emotional scenes that he shares with Britt Robertson who is almost unrecognisable compared to the roles that she has recently played in Tomorrowland and The Longest Ride.

Marshall really does find the right mix of comedy and drama and manages to make Mother’s Day a credible film that is a joy to watch. This is a film that you can easily become emotionally involved with and with great acting performances from the likes of Aniston, Hudson and Sarah Chalke this is actually a film that you won’t groan at if someone in your family decides that want to watch it every Mother’s Day. Garry Marshall take a bow you have finally learnt how to make a good ensemble film.

 

Stars(3)

 

 

Greg King:

Mother’s Day is the third film in director Garry Marshall’s unofficial trilogy based around Hallmark-like “special events” holidays, and it follows the bland template established by the romcom Valentine’s Day and New Year’s Eve. All three films are multi-character narratives with interwoven storylines and a star studded ensemble cast in which a bevy of A-listers vie for screen time. In terms of quality thoughMother’s Day falls somewhere between the superior Valentine’s Day and the lacklustre New Year’s Eve, which seem a little contrived by comparison.

Given the title it’s not surprising that all of the narrative strands here revolve around different concepts of motherhood, maternal responsibilities, complex mother and child relationships, and the daily struggles of motherhood. The formulaic script has been written by four writers including Anya Kochoff Romano (Monster-in-Law) and three first time screenwriters in actor turned writer Tom Hines (a regular in many of Marshall’s films), Lily Hollander, and Matthew Walker, which accounts for a slight unevenness in tone at times.

The film is set in Atlanta and centres around a number of middle class women during the days leading up to the titular celebration day.

Jesse (Kate Hudson) and her sister Gabi (Sarah Chalke, from Scrubs, etc) live next to each other, and they haven’t seen their parents for a couple of years, mainly because they fear that their judgemental mother (Margot Martindale) will disapprove of their lifestyle choices. Jesse has married Russell (Aasif Mandvi), a doctor of Indian descent with whom she has a young son, while Gabi is gay and married to her girlfriend Max (Cameron Esposito). But when their parents unexpectedly stop by for a surprise visit the scene is set for some emotional upheavals and broad racist humour before a reconciliation can be affected.

Sandy (Jennifer Aniston) is divorced from her husband Henry (Timothy Olyphant, from tv’s Justified, etc), but they seem to share a good relationship. But then Sandy is shocked to learn that he has married the much younger Tina (Shay Mitchell, from Pretty Little Liars, etc). She is a little jealous and even bitter at having to share her two sons with their new stepmother who is barely out of puberty herself.

Bradley (Jason Sudeikis) is a physical trainer still recovering from the death of his wife (a cameo from Jennifer Garner), a soldier who was killed in action in Afghanistan a year ago. He is something of a mister mum, trying to raise his two daughters, but struggling to keep it all together. Several of the women at the gym where he works are trying to fix him up with a suitable partner. But as Mother’s Day approaches, Bradley is not sure how to handle his emotions.

Zack (Jack Whitehall) works in a bar but is also an aspiring stand up comic. He wants to marry his girlfriend Kristin (Britt Robertson, from The Last Ride, etc), who is the mother of his young daughter. But Kristin was adopted as a child and is still suffering from some abandonment issues. She is reluctant to marry him until she can come to terms with who she is.

The link that draws all these various characters together is Miranda (Julia Roberts), the popular host of a television home shopping network program and celebrity author.

The cast do what they can with their at times cliched characters. Aniston is a familiar figure in romcoms, and fittingly most of the best moments and best lines are given to her character. She manages to bring the material alive whenever she is on screen. Hector Elizondo, who has appeared in all of Marshall’s films, has a small role here as Miranda’s increasingly exasperated manager.

This is surprisingly lazy filmmaking from veteran Marshall, who of course gave us such classic television sitcoms as Happy Days, Mork And Mindy and The Odd Couple, and big screen romantic comedies like the classic Pretty WomanMother’s Day is suffused with his trademark mix of humour and warmth. Here he juggles his large cast and multi story lines deftly enough, and gives us a mix of slapstick humour mixed with sentimentality that sometimes slips into mawkishness.

 

Stars(2.5)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3)

 

IMDB Rating: Mother's Day (2016) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Mother’s Day reviews: You can also listen to our full Mother’s Day review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #174.

Trailer:

This Is Where I Leave You

Summary: A Jewish family that isn’t used to observing their faith’s traditions is forced to fulfill their father’s final wish and sit Shivah together and confront their problems.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 23rd October, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Shawn Levy

Screenwriter: Jonathan Tropper

Cast: Michael Barra (Ollie), Jason Bateman (Judd Altman), Barbara Bleier (Trish), Connie Britton (Tracy Sullivan), Carly Brooke (Chelsea), Rose Byrne (Penny Moore), Cantor Mia Fram Davidson (Cantor), Adam Driver (Phillip Altman), Oakes Fegley (Young Judd), Tina Fey (Wendy Altman), Jane Fonda (Hillary Altman), Michael Bryan French (Dr. Rausch), Kathryn Hahn (Annie Altman), Cade Lappin (Cole), Aaron Lazar (Barry Weissman), Beth Leavel (Renee), Debra Monk (Linda Callen), Olivia Oguma (Shelby), Timothy Olyphant (Hory Callen), Lance Roberts (Calvin), Ben Schwartz (Rabbi Charles Grodner (Boner)), Carolyn Seiff (Mrs. Applebaum), Dax Shepard (Wade Beaufort), Abigail Spencer (Quinn Altman), Cheryl Stern (Lois), Corey Stoll (Paul Altman), Will Swenson (Younger Mort), Gerry Vichi (Uncle Joe)

Runtime: 103 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR THIS IS WHERE I LEAVE YOU REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Greg King: You can check out Greg’s This Is Where I Leave You review on www.filmreviews.net.au

Stars(2.5)

 

David Griffiths:

Jason Bateman has been a bit of a comedic golden path just recently. It seems every comedy film that he has touched has turned to box office gold with the likes of Due Date and Horrible Bosses leading the way. But you can only wonder whether he has gone skidding of that path badly with This Is Where I Leave You a film that manages to pack together a stellar ensemble cast… but forgets that a film just can’t work if you overcrowd it with so many characters that people can’t keep track of who is who.

Based on the hit novel by Jonathan Tropper (who also pens the screenplay here) This Is Where I Leave You sees one of life’s losers Judd Altman’s (Jason Bateman) life take a turn for a new low, when he comes home from work to find his wife in bed with his egotistical boss, Wade (Dax Shepard).

Then life delivers another blow to Judd when he learns that his father has died. While at the funeral Judd and his siblings learn from their mother, Hillary (Jane Fonda) that their father’s dying wish was that they all turn back to their Jewish roots and return home to their mother for a week. So soon Judd, Wendy (Tina Fey), Phillip (Adam Driver) and Paul (Corey Stoll) are all back under the roof and digging up painful memories from the past that puts them all on edge. Judd is also faced with the new dilemma of does he finally decide to take a risk in his life and turn his back on his cheating wife and take a chance with his friend from High School Penny Moore (Rose Byrne).

On paper This Is Where I Leave You should be a brilliant film. The all star comedic cast should suggest that this film should glitter with comedy gold while the fact that it is based on a hit novel means the film should have a ready made audience. But perhaps the biggest problem here is that the novel has been adapted for the screen by the same man who penned the novel in the first place, a practice that never really works because an author treats his novel like a baby and never wants to cut a thing out of it. As a result This Is Where I Leave You is a film that has just too many characters and is packed absolutely full of subplots.

The result is an over-long film that loses its audience at times with scenes that don’t need to be there and flat spots that end up overshadowing the good comedic moments such as the boys smoking a joint in the synagogue causing mayhem to ensue. Then there are also the comedy moments that do nothing else but make you groan like Wade’s car being overturned by a bunch of steroid abusing idiots.

The other major problem with having so many characters piled into the film is that it means that no actor really ever gets a chance to shine. Jason Bateman just seems to breeze through this film with no effort whatsoever while people such as Rose Byrne and Connie Britton are completely wasted in roles that could have really been filled by nobodies.

Likewise the comedic skills of Jane Fonda and Tina Fey are completely stunted as the weak script rarely gives them a chance to impress or even get a chuckle out of their audience. Even Timothy Olyphant and Dax Shepard are in stunted roles while Adam Driver manages to buck the trend a little by bringing some skills to the table as he portrays the juvenile yet unhappy playboy, Phillip.

This Is Where I Leave You should have been an interesting comedic drama that explored the world of a family in turmoil. With the cast assembled it should have been a beautifully delivered character drama but all because of one weak script it ends up becoming a bit of a mess. The over indulgence of characters means that nobody ever gets a chance to shine while too many opportunities for a good laugh fall by the wayside. Sadly This Is Where I Leave You will be jotted down as one of the disappointments of 2014.

Stars(3)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3)

 

IMDB Rating: This Is Where I Leave You (2014) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Reviews of ‘This Is Where I Leave You′: For our full This Is Where I Leave You review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #102 . You can also check Dave’s This Is Where I Leave You review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer: