Monthly Archives: October 2012

Argo

Summary:As the Iranian revolution reaches a boiling point, a CIA ‘exfiltration’ specialist concocts a risky plan to free six Americans who have found shelter at the home of the Canadian Ambassador. They must shoot a film in Iran.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 25th October, 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Ben Affleck

Screenwriter: Joshuah Bearman (article), Chris Terrio

Cast: Omid Abtahi (Reza Borhani), Ben Affleck (Tony Mendez), Ryan Ahern (Sgt. Sickmann), Alan Arkin (Lester Siegel), Adrienne Barbeau (Nina), Kerry Bishe (Kathy Stafford), John Boyd (Lamont), Rob Brownstein (Landon Butler), J.R. Cacia (Brice), Kyle Chandler (Hamilton Jordan), Rory Cochrane (Lee Schatz), Bryan Cranston (Jack O’Donnell), Kelly Curran (Princess Aleppa), Christopher Denham (Mark Lijek), Danilo Di Julio (Sgt. Gauthier), Richard Dillane (OSS Officer Nichols), Tate Donovan (Bob Anders), Clea DuVall (Cora Lijek), Nikka Far (Tahran Mary), Victor Garber (Ken Taylor), Roberto Garcia (Sgt. William Gallegos), Lindsay Ginter (Hedley Donovan), Matthew Glave (Col. Charles W. Scott), John Goodman (John Chambers), Bob Gunton (Cyrus Vance), Zeljko Ivanek (Robert Pender), Bill Kalmenson (Hal Saunders), Richard Kind (Max Klein), Jon Woodward Kirby (Fred Kupke), Page Leong (Pat Taylor), Barry Livingston (David Marmor), Karina Logue (Elizabeth Anne Swift), Victor McCay (Malick), Scoot McNairy (Joe Stafford), Jamie McShane (William J. Daugherty), Chris Messina (Malinov), Araz Vahid Ebrahim Nia (Moradi), Matt Nolan (Peter Genco), Michael Parks (Jack Kirby), Tim Quill (Alan Sosa), Ali Saam (Ali Khalkhali), Yuri Sardarov (Rossi), Taylor Schilling (Christine Mendez),  Christopher Stanley (Thomas L. Ahern Jnr.), David Sullivan (Jon Titterton), Aidan Sussman (Ian Mendez), Keith Szarabajka (Adam Engell),  Bill Tangradi (Alan B. Golacinski), Shelia Vand (Sahar), Titus Welliver (Bates)

Runtime: 120 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Argo’ Review: 

Ben Affleck may as well start preparing room on one of his shelves because he’ll soon be bringing home a new friend named Oscar. While many films are dubiously called ‘film of the year’ Argo isn’t just one that truly deserves that title, it actually deserves to be called one of the films of the generation.

Based on real events Argo is set in late 1979 and early 1980 when a group of American Embassy workers are taken hostage during a revolution in Iran (then called Tehran). What worries the American Government even more is the fact that some of the workers escaped the embassy and need to be rescued from where they are hiding in the Canadian Ambassador’s House. With their lives in danger the government wants them rescued as quickly as possibly but with guards patrolling all the airports it is going to take a very special story to get past them.

Enter CIA Agent Jack O’Donnell (Bryan Cranston – Total Recall, Rock Of Ages) who turns to one of his top operatives, Tony Mendez (Ben Affleck – To The Wonder, The Town) to come up with a believable story. However when Tony gets famous producer John Chambers (John Goodman – Flight, Trouble With The Curve) and director Lester Siegel (Alan Arkin – Arigo, The Muppets) on board to try and trick the Iranian Government into thinking that Hollywood is about to film a sci-fi blockbuster in their country it is up to O’Donnell to try and get a list of people including Hamilton Jordon (Kyle Chandler – Super 8, TV’S Friday Night Lights) to see that this far-fetched plan could actually work.

While many have criticized Ben Affleck for some of the poor acting roles he has filmed over the years you certainly can’t criticise his directing skills. With films like Gone Baby Gone and The Town under his belt Affleck cemented himself as one of the most exciting directors going around. Argo tops any of them though and shows Affleck is in fact one of the most talented directors that Hollywood has ever seen.

Few directors manage to present suspense to their audience in the way that Affleck does with Argo. So tense are the scenes at the airport that the audience are on the edge of their seat yet Affleck still makes the film completely natural, he never milks it for theatrical effect and as a result the audience at the Melbourne media screening was so impressed they broke out into a round of applause… something that rarely happens with modern films.

The naturalistic feel to Argo enhances many scenes and when you see photographs of the actual events (and the people that took part in them) you can see that Affleck has gone for a brand of perfection that just goes to show what a fine director he really is.

Argo is a guaranteed Oscar winner and will go down in history as one of the finest movies ever made.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Argo′: http://www.helium.com/items/2384900-movie-reviews-argo-2012 Also check Episode #5 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Argo’

Rating: 5/5

IMDB Rating: Argo (2012) on IMDb

Frankenweenie

Summary: From creative genius Tim Burton (“Alice in Wonderland,” The Nightmare Before Christmas”) comes Frankenweenie, a heartwarming tale about a boy and his dog. After unexpectedly losing his beloved dog Sparky, young Victor harnesses the power of science to bring his best friend back to life – with just a few minor adjustments. He tries to hide his home-sewn creation, but when Sparky gets out, Victor’s fellow students, teachers and the entire town all learn that getting a new “leash on life” can be monstrous.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 25th October, 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Tim Burton

Screenwriter: John August, Tim Burton, Leonard Ripps

Cast: Dee Bradley Baker (Persephone van Helsing/Shelly/Were-Rat/Colossus/Mr. Whiskers/Driver (voice)), Robert Capron (Bob (voice)), Martin Landau (Mr. Rzykruski (voice)), Christopher Lee (Movie Dracula), James Hiroyuki Liao (Toshiaki (voice)), Catharine O’Hara (Mrs. Frankenstein/Weird Girl/Gym Teacher (voice)), Winona Ryder (Elsa Van Helsing (voice)), Atticus Shaffer (Edgar ‘E’ Gore (voice)), Martin Short ((Mr. Frankenstein/Mr. Burgemeister/Nassor (voice)), Melissa Stribling (Movie Mina), Charlie Tahan (Victor Frankenstein (voice)), Frank Welker (Sparky Frankenstein (voice))

Runtime: 87 mins

Classification: PG

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Frankenweenie’ Review: 

It’s something that fans of director of Tim Burton have never had to go through before… a patch where the legendary filmmaker has actually delivered some fairly ordinary films. Alice In Wondeland was one of the worst films he has ever delivered while Dark Shadows was good but nowhere near as great as the films that have earned Burton the respect of the film making world over his career. So it’s great to see Burton get to the top of his game once again with Frankenweenie.

Frankenweenie follows young Victor Frankenstein (voiced by Charlie Tahan – TV’S Blue Bloods & Law & Order: Special Victims Unit) a gifted young student who listens too carefully to his science teacher, Mr. Rzykruski (Martin Landau – Dark Horse, Have A Little Faith) and brings his one true friend, his dog Sparky back to life after he is killed in a tragic accident.

Victor is quick to work out that he needs to keep the revived Sparky a secret from his parents (Catherine O’Hara – TV’S Leslie & Glenn Martin DDS and Martin Short – Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted, TV’S The Cat In The Hat Knows A Lot About That) but when fellow student Edgar (Atticus Shaffer – TV’S The Middle & Shake It Up) finds out what has happened it is only a matter of time until others including Elsa (Winona Ryder – The Letter, The Iceman), Bob (Robert Capron – Diary Of A Wimpy Kid: Dog Days, The Three Stooges) and Toshiaki (James Hiroyuki Liao – Applebaum, World Invasion: Battle LA) also find out and decide they can try and bring things back to life as well.

Frankenweenie sees Tim Burton return to the type of stop animation that made some of his early movies really stand out. Together with a great script Burton has used the animation of Frankenweenie to really take this film back to the period when it was set… in the 1950s. Throughout the film Burton pays tribute to horror films of the past in such a way that the film becomes a pure joy for any serious film lover to watch.

In fact while Frankenweenie is being promoted as a children’s/family film you would have to argue that this is one animated films that adults are going to love, even the script allows for some adult humor that will go right over the heads of all the kids in the audience.

The other part of Frankenweenie that makes this such a memorable film is the amount of work that the animators have put into each character. While some resemble characters from horror films of the past others are so strange and hilarious that you’ll end up laughing as soon as they appear on screen.

Frankeweenie sees Tim Burton return to his usual brilliance and you certainly won’t be disappointed.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Frankenweenie′: http://www.helium.com/items/2381893-movie-reviews-frankenweenie-2012 Also check Episode #5 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Frankenweenie’

Rating: 4/5

IMDB Rating:Frankenweenie (2012) on IMDb

Performance

Summary: Set in contemporary Manhattan, PERFORMANCE tells the story of four musicians, bound together by their passion for music and a long, faithful collaboration. The celebrated string quartet struggles to stay together as they mark their 25th anniversary.

When their dignified patriarch and cellist, Peter (Walken) is diagnosed with a terminal illness, it throws the future of the group into question. His attempt to find a replacement player and organise rehearsals for their upcoming concert bring up unresolved issues and grievances.

Daniel (Ivanir) is the first violin. Robert (Seymour Hoffman) plays second violin, but longs to be the lead. Juliette (Keener) plays viola and is married to Robert, and steadfastly refused to consider the quartet without Peter.

Alliances are forged, egos bruised and passions flare as the dysfunctional family of artists begin to implode. Can they pull together for one final great performance – of Beethoven’s Opus 131 at Carnegie Hall?

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 14th March, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Yaron Zilberman

Screenwriter: Seth Grossman, Yaron Zilberman

Cast: Liraz Charhi (Pilar), Philip Seymour Hoffman (RobertGelbart), Mark Ivanir (Daniel Lerner), Madhur Jaffrey (Dr. Nadir), Catherine Keener (Juliette Gelbert), Nina Lee (Nina Lee), Megan McQuillan (Brenda), Imogen Poots (Alexandra Gerbert), Wallace Shawn (Gideon Rosen), Anne Sofie von Otter (Miriam), Christopher Walken (Peter Mitchell), Andrew Yee (Steve)

Runtime: 106 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘A Late Quartet’ Review: Please check Dave’s review of ‘A Late Quartet’ that is available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘A Late Quartet′: Check Episode #24 (available 14th March, 2013) of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘A Late Quartet’.

Rating: 4/5

IMDB Rating:A Late Quartet (2012) on IMDb

Searching For Sugarman

Summary: Momentarily hailed as the finest recording artist of his generation, he disappeared into oblivion – rising again from the ashes in a completely different context a continent away. SEARCHING FOR SUGAR MAN is a film about hope, inspiration and the resonating power of music.

In the late ‘60s, a musician was discovered in a Detroit bar by two celebrated producers who were struck by his soulful melodies and prophetic lyrics. They recorded an album that they believed was going to secure his reputation as one of the greatest recording artists of his generation. In fact, the album bombed and the singer disappeared into obscurity amid rumors of a gruesome on-stage suicide. But a bootleg recording found its way into apartheid South Africa and, over the next two decades, it became a phenomenon. Two South African fans then set out to find out what really happened to their hero. Their investigation led them to a story more extraordinary than any of the existing myths about the artist known as Rodriguez.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 4th October, 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Malik Bendjelloul

Screenwriter: Malik Bendjelloul

Cast: Ilse Assmann (himself), Clarence Avant (himself), Craig Bartholomew-Strydom (himself), Malik Bendjelloul (himself), Dennis Coffey (himself), Dan Dimaggio (himself), Rick Emmerson (himself), Jerome Ferretti (himself), Berry Gordon Jnr. (himself), Steve M. Harris (himself), Rian Malan (himself), Robbie Mann (himself), Willem Moller (himself), Rodriguez (himself), Eva Rodriguez (herself), Regan Rodriguez (herself), Sandra Rodriguez-Kennedy (herself), Steve Rowland (himself), Steve Segerman (himself), Mike Theodore (himself)

Runtime: 86 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Searching For Sugarman’ Review: 

You can hear Subculture Media’s review of ‘Searching For Sugarman’ in episode #2 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast .

Rating: TBA

IMDB Rating: Searching for Sugar Man (2012) on IMDb