Category: Film Festivals

Lavazza Italian Film Festival

The 2016 Lavazza Italian Film Festival screens at Palace Cinemas around Australia from September 13. The opening night film is Perfect Strangers, while closing night sees a screening of a restored print of William Wyler’s 1953 romantic comedy Roman Holiday, starring Audrey Hepburn in her Oscar winning role and Gregory Peck. Greg spoke to festival director Elyssa Zeccola to find out more about this year’s program.

You can listen to or download our Elyssa Zeccola interview right here.

AICE Israeli Film Festival

The 13th AICE Israeli Film Festival begins screening from September 14 at Melbourne’s Cinema Nova and from September 15 at Sydney’s Ritz Theatre. The opening night film is Firebirds. This year the festival has undergone some small changes. Greg spoke to festival director Richard Moore to find out more about the Israeli Film Festival Competition and the films screening.

You can listen to or download our Richard Moore interview right here

Monster Fest 2016

Monster Fest, Australia’s premier genre festival, returns to the Lido Cinema in Melbourne from Nov 24-27, 2016, for four days of premieres, special guests, repertory sidebars, short films, presentations and more.

In conjunction with the festival, Monster also announces the return of the Monster Academy -  now dubbed The Swinburne University Media and Communication Monster Academy – a two-day industry conference that takes place Nov 23 and 24th, running up to the festival itself.

We are pleased to announce that veteran director Ted Kotcheff will appear in person to present the film that many critics regard as the greatest Australian film ever made, his 1971 outback classic WAKE IN FRIGHT, as well as screenings of FIRST BLOOD (1982), WEEKEND AT BERNIE’S (1989) and SPLIT IMAGE (1982), the latter as part of our previously announced all-night Cult of Monster marathon.

Kotcheff will also be the keynote speaker at the Swinburne University Media and Communication Monster Academy with a three-hour masterclass on Thursday Nov 24thA limited number of tickets are now on sale for the masterclass HERE: >> https://www.trybooking.com/227339

We’re also excited to announce that Sundance WTF sensation THE GREASY STRANGLER will be our Closing Film followed by a GREASY GALA with the two stars of the film, special guests Sky Elobar (Big Brayden) and Michael St. Michaels (Big Ronnie – the Greasy Strangler himself) in person! The premiere of the film The Guardian called “a playful oasis of filth and depravity” andEmpire called “one of the best movies of 2016” will be accompanied by a nationwide tour with the stars in attendance for special event screenings, “Greasy Disco”, themed drinks, “Hootie Tootie Disco Cutie” contests and various oily hijinx.  Grease is the word!

Weekend passes to Monster Fest are on sale now for $199 AUD. This includes access to all screenings and events at Lido Cinemas from Nov 24-27, including the Opening and Closing Parties and the all-night Cult of Monster Marathon. Individual Day Passes are also available for $65 AUD. Passes are available now on the Lido website HERE:https://www.lidocinemas.com.au/Promotion/Monster-Fest-2016-At-Lido

2016 MIFFEmo The Musical

Emo The Musical is the debut feature film for Neil Triffett, and is an extension of his 15 minute short film from 2014. As part of our MIFF coverage, Greg spoke to Neil about adapting the short film for this feature length version and about all things emo and musical.
Emo The Musical screens at Melbourne International Film Festival Thurs Aug 12 at 6.30pm @ Forum, Sat Aug 13 at 1.30pm @ Comedy, and Sun Aug 14 at 4pm @ Kino. Neil will be attendance at all sessions for Q&As following the film.

You can listen to or download our Neil Triffett interview right here.

2016 MIFF

Newtown is a documentary that looks at the raw emotional aftermath of the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School in December 2012. As part of our extensive MIFF 2016 coverage, Greg spoke to filmmaker Kim A Snyder about the movie and the complicated and topical issue of gun control in America.
Newtown screens at Melbourne International Film Festival – Sun July 31 at 9.15pm @ Kino, and Mon Aug 1 at 6.45pm @ Hoyts Melbourne Central.

You can listen to or download our Kim A Snyder interview right here.

 

2016 MIFFTickled

 

New Zealand journalist David Farrier explores the weird and wonderful world of competitive endurance tickling in the entertaining documentary that slowly evolves into a thriller and a look at the darker underbelly of the internet. As part of our MIFF coverage, Greg spoke to David to find out more about the challenges of shooting this documentary.
Tickled screens at Melbourne International Film Festival Sun July 31 at 4pm @ Comedy and Wed Aug 3 at 6.30pm @ Hoyts Melbourne Central. David will be in attendance for a Q&A following the screenings. Tickled hits local cinemas on Aug 18 for a limited season.

You can listen to or download our David Farrier interview right here.

2016 MIFFDown Under

Down Under is a black comedy set in the aftermath of the Cronulla Riots, and it looks at some themes that are quite topical given recent events in Australia. This is writer/director Abe Forsythe’s first feature film since 2003’s Ned. Greg spoke to Abe to find out more about the film.
Down Under screens as MIFF’s Centrepiece Gala on Saturday August 6 at the Comedy Theatre.

You can listen to or download our Abe Forsythe interview right here.

2016 MIFF

On Richard’s Side is the third film in Andrew Wiseman’s moving trilogy following the challenges facing Richard Croft, who was born with a severe intellectual disability.

His father has recently died and now his mother Deidre is trying to find long term accommodation for him. The film gives us some insights into what it means to live with a disability. Greg spoke to Andrew about the film and his experiences of filming Richard over a thirty year period.

On Richard’s Side screens at Melbourne International Film Festival – Sun July 31 at 4pm @Kino, Tues Aug 2 at 4pm @ Kino, and Thurs Aug 4 at 6.30pm @ Kino. Andrew will be attending the screenings to participate in Q&A sessions.

You can listen to or download our Andrew Wiseman interview right here.

 

2016 MIFF

Down Under

Summary: A black comedy set during the aftermath of the Cronulla riots, it is the story of two carloads of hotheads from both sides of the fight destined to collide.

Year: 2016

Australian Cinema Release Date: 11th August 2016

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Australia

Director: Abe Forsythe

Screenwriter: Abe Forsythe

Cast: Fayssal Bazzi (D-Mac), Josef Ber (Sgt.Bryce Halliday), Chris Bunton (Evan), Ruby Burke (Destiny), Suppakorn Chuwongwut (Nutt), Arka Das (Steve), Michael Denkha (Ibrahim), Harriet Dyer (Stacey), Alexander England (Shit-Stick), David Field (Vic), Damon Herriman (Jason), Josh McConville (Gav), Marshall Napier (Graham), Henry Nixon (Sgt. James McFadden), Julia Ohannessian (Rashida), Lap Phan (Terry), Robert Rabiah (Amir), Rahel Romahn (Nick), Justin Rosniak (Ditch), Anthony Taufa (Taufa), Christiaan Van Vurren (Doof), Lincoln Younes (Hassim), Dylan Young (Az)

Runtime: 90 mins

Classification: TBC

 

OUR DOWN UNDER REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

John Noonan:

Sometimes the best comedy is the darkest. In Duck Soup, The Marx Brothers’ led Freedonia into a good old fashioned knees up to celebrate the oncoming war that will swamp the country. The terrorists in Chris Morris’ Four Lions are shown to be petty, back stabbers that argue about Mini-Babybels and struggle to align their separate ideologies. And now we have Abe Forsyth’s Down Under, a violent, gut-bursting farce set against the backdrop of the Cronulla Riots.

We follow two separate groups of men chomping at the bit to get into a boot party. In the Cronulla corner, we have family man Jason (Damon Herriman) and Ned Kelly’s biggest fan Ditch (Justin Rosniak) on the prowl for anyone looking vaguely middle eastern. And vague is the operative word, as at one point it becomes apparent that they’re not even sure who they’re really after. To bulk up their numbers, they drag along dope head Shit-Stick (Alexander England) who would rather watch Lord of the Rings with his cousin from Nimbi, Evan (Chris Bunton)

Playing for the Sydney West team is the fiery Nick (Rahel Romahn), insufferable beat-boxer D-Mac (Fayssal Bazzi) and deeply religious Ibrahim (Michael Denkha). Tagging along with them is Hassim (Lincoln Younes), whose brother went missing the day the riots started.

Neither group is treated as the heroes of Down Under. Instead Forsythe highlights how their need to bash people because of a perceived difference really comes from the same misguided rage. And in the film, as in real life, this rage only begets more rage until no one is listening to anyone. It’s interesting to note that the director never allows the violence committed by the men to be diluted by the comedy. Each punch and bat swung connects viciously, there’s consequences to what they deal out. Instead, he bursts their bubbles by highlighting their naivety and hypocrisy, such as when Jason takes a break from bashing to get his pregnant girlfriend a kebab, or when Nick’s bravado reveals a violent resentment of immigrants. Other times, Forsythe soundtracks his characters’ actions to inappropriate pop songs from the era, including a rather wonderful rendition of Natalie Imbruglia’s Torn.

Where Down Under falls flat, at least for me, is Nick and Hassim’s interactions with drug dealer, Vic (David Field). Vic’s lascivious advances towards Hassim whilst surrounded by well-oiled, well-muscled young men feels trite and, in a film that lampoons stereotypes, feels, well, stereotypical. Because despite how the film’s trailer portrays them, these aren’t stupid men. Sure they say stupid things, but they’re clearly caught up in the chest beating and hubris that’s permeating in the streets. One of Jason’s team is revealed to have a white collar job, whilst Hassim is shown from the off-set to be studying for uni. These are not all thick men, and that’s what makes them scary. They’ve found an opportunity to release they deep-rooted beliefs.

With an ending that will pull the rug from under you, Down Under exposes the underbelly and idiocy of racism through laughter, violence, copious amounts of swearing and B*Witched songs. Sure to be controversial, you need to see it.

 

Stars(3.5)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):   Stars(3.5)

 

IMDB Rating:  Down Under (2016) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Down Under reviews: Nil.

 

Trailer: