Tagged: Jamie McShane

Gone Girl Poster

Summary: When Nick Dunne (Ben Affleck) discovers that his wife Amy (Rosamund Pike) is missing and there is sign of a struggle, he is immediately concerned. But as the case develops, the nation becomes transfixed with the search and a series of clues begin to make Nick look like something other than a mere bystander, the police, the media, the viewing public and his family begin to doubt his innocence.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 4th October, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: David Fincher

Screenwriter: Gillian Flynn

Cast: Lynn Adrianna (Kelly Capitono), Ben Affleck (Nick Dunne), Lisa Banes (Marybeth Elliott), David Clennon (Rand Elliott), Carrie Coon (Margo Dunne), Kim Dickens (Detective Rhonda Boney), Nicholas Fagerberg (Charlie), Patrick Fugit (Officer Jim Gilpin), Neil Patrick Harris (Desi Collings), Alexander Michael Helisek (Mover Charles), Boyd Holbrook (Jeff), Pete Housman (Walter), Leonard Kelly-Young (Bill Dunne), Lola Kirke (Greta), Saffron Mazzia (Celina), Scoot McNairy (Tommy O’Hara), Jamie McShane (Donnelly), Terry Myers (Steve Eckart), Kathleen Rose Perkins (Shawna Kelly), Tyler Perry (Tanner Bolt), Rosamund Pike (Amy Dunne), Missi Pyle (Ellen Abbott), Emily Ratajowski (Andie Hardy), Donna Rusch (Lauren Nevens), Cyd Strittmatter (Maureen Dunne), Sela Ward (Sharon Scheiber), Casey Wilson (Noelle Hawthorne), Ricky Wood (Jason)

Runtime: 149 mins

Classification: MA15+

 

OUR GONE GIRL REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Adam Ross: You can check out Adam’s Gone Girl review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #99 .

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Greg King: You can check out Greg’s Gone Girl review on www.filmreviews.net.au

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Nick Gardiner: You can check out Nick’s Gone Girl review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #99

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David Griffiths:

If people were asked to name a director that has been pretty much constant for releasing great films over his career many would have David Fincher on their list. With films like Se7en, Fight Club and The Social Network on his resume you could argue that he is one of the most important directors of the past twenty years. Hell, he is even one of the very few directors who have been able to make a U.S. remake of a foreign film not only something watchable but something that was a hit with both critics and the public alike.

Now comes his latest film Gone Girl, which to many film lovers has become one of the most eagerly anticipated films of 2014. So how does it fair up? Well to be honest this is probably the must un-David Fincher films that Fincher has made to date in his career, but despite saying that this is a film that certainly works and shows that there are people out there in the cinematic world who are willing to try something different and be creative in doing so.

Based on Gillian Flynn’s hit novel of the same name the story of Gone Girl is told in three parts. First we find out-of-work writer Nick Dunne (Ben Affleck) return home one day to find his wife Amy Dunne (Rosamund Pike) missing. Nick is a suspect from Day One and even the help of celebrity lawyer Tanner Bolt (Tyler Perry) can’t stop the media from making him one of America’s most hated men.

The second part of the film follows Amy’s story and then the third and final act pretty much delivers the wash-up and sees Detective Rhonda Boney (Kim Dickens) trying to tie up the loose ends of the case and help those that have been caught up in it all get on with their lives.

Now the first thing you’ll notice is that I’ve been pretty vague in my description of the plot of the film. That is because if someone ruins what happens in this film for you then they are the kind of the person that you should not associate with, this is a film that you need to go into cold with. Even those that have read the novel will not get the special thrill that those who know nothing about the story will get when they view this film.

The three acts of the film being so well defined throughout the film does take some getting used to but it actually does work and you certainly aren’t going to complain when the constant twists and turns that seem to play with your mind throughout this film. Just a word of warning though don’t try to over think the criminal case part of this film because while Fincher and Flynn (who is also the screenwriter here) have been pretty smart it would only take someone who has watched a couple of episodes of C.S.I. to see that there are many flaws involved in this film’s so called ingenious criminal plot.

One of the things that really lifts this film though is the style and tone that Fincher and Flynn have brought to the table. The script heads into some pretty dark areas but unlike a film like The Lovely Bones there is also some dark humor in there designed to get a chuckle from the audience. That element brings a touch of Fargo to the film while the town setting and Fincher’s way of portraying the community and society instantly conjures up thoughts of David Lynch’s career, particularly Twin Peaks. The good thing is that these styles meld together pretty well and despite the film’s length this is a film that will keep you engrossed for the entire time without any clock-watching.

Once again though the big talking point about this film is the fact that David Fincher has once again got the most out of his cast. Many like to highlight the fact that Ben Affleck has made some horrendous films over his career (and let’s be honest films like Gigli are pretty hard to forget) but over recent years he has also become one the finest characters actors going around. Here Fincher works with that and as a result you see Affleck play Nick Dunne in such a way that as an audience you find your feelings for the guy change almost from minute-to-minute. One moment you feel sorry for him and the next you are hoping he gets the death penalty.

Fincher also directs Rosamund Pike to a performance that should see her get an Oscar nomination. She plays a character with a lot of ‘issues’ (again I don’t want to give anything away) in such a way that she conjures up thoughts of some of the performances by the leading ladies in past 90s thrillers like Basic Instinct. Even the sub-cast get a good look in here with Kim Dickens playing Fincher’s Lynch-like Detective brilliantly well, Tyler Perry finally delivering a performance that will warm him to people outside of his normal fan base while Neil Patrick Harris joins the growing list of comedic actors who are dangerously good when playing criminally minded nut-jobs.

While not as good as some of Fincher’s previous films like Se7en and The Social Network Gone Girl is still a credible film that does deserve to be listed as one of 2014’s finest. The twists and turns of the plot will captivate the audience while its slamming of today’s trial-by-media mentality also gives the audience something to ponder once the credits have rolled. The film’s unique mix of drama, suspense and dark humor should guarantee that it also stands up against the test of time.
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Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(4)

 

IMDB Rating: Gone Girl (2014) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Reviews of ‘Gone Girl′: For our full Gone Girl review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #99 . You can also read Dave’s Gone Girl review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

Argo

Summary:As the Iranian revolution reaches a boiling point, a CIA ‘exfiltration’ specialist concocts a risky plan to free six Americans who have found shelter at the home of the Canadian Ambassador. They must shoot a film in Iran.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 25th October, 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Ben Affleck

Screenwriter: Joshuah Bearman (article), Chris Terrio

Cast: Omid Abtahi (Reza Borhani), Ben Affleck (Tony Mendez), Ryan Ahern (Sgt. Sickmann), Alan Arkin (Lester Siegel), Adrienne Barbeau (Nina), Kerry Bishe (Kathy Stafford), John Boyd (Lamont), Rob Brownstein (Landon Butler), J.R. Cacia (Brice), Kyle Chandler (Hamilton Jordan), Rory Cochrane (Lee Schatz), Bryan Cranston (Jack O’Donnell), Kelly Curran (Princess Aleppa), Christopher Denham (Mark Lijek), Danilo Di Julio (Sgt. Gauthier), Richard Dillane (OSS Officer Nichols), Tate Donovan (Bob Anders), Clea DuVall (Cora Lijek), Nikka Far (Tahran Mary), Victor Garber (Ken Taylor), Roberto Garcia (Sgt. William Gallegos), Lindsay Ginter (Hedley Donovan), Matthew Glave (Col. Charles W. Scott), John Goodman (John Chambers), Bob Gunton (Cyrus Vance), Zeljko Ivanek (Robert Pender), Bill Kalmenson (Hal Saunders), Richard Kind (Max Klein), Jon Woodward Kirby (Fred Kupke), Page Leong (Pat Taylor), Barry Livingston (David Marmor), Karina Logue (Elizabeth Anne Swift), Victor McCay (Malick), Scoot McNairy (Joe Stafford), Jamie McShane (William J. Daugherty), Chris Messina (Malinov), Araz Vahid Ebrahim Nia (Moradi), Matt Nolan (Peter Genco), Michael Parks (Jack Kirby), Tim Quill (Alan Sosa), Ali Saam (Ali Khalkhali), Yuri Sardarov (Rossi), Taylor Schilling (Christine Mendez),  Christopher Stanley (Thomas L. Ahern Jnr.), David Sullivan (Jon Titterton), Aidan Sussman (Ian Mendez), Keith Szarabajka (Adam Engell),  Bill Tangradi (Alan B. Golacinski), Shelia Vand (Sahar), Titus Welliver (Bates)

Runtime: 120 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Argo’ Review: 

Ben Affleck may as well start preparing room on one of his shelves because he’ll soon be bringing home a new friend named Oscar. While many films are dubiously called ‘film of the year’ Argo isn’t just one that truly deserves that title, it actually deserves to be called one of the films of the generation.

Based on real events Argo is set in late 1979 and early 1980 when a group of American Embassy workers are taken hostage during a revolution in Iran (then called Tehran). What worries the American Government even more is the fact that some of the workers escaped the embassy and need to be rescued from where they are hiding in the Canadian Ambassador’s House. With their lives in danger the government wants them rescued as quickly as possibly but with guards patrolling all the airports it is going to take a very special story to get past them.

Enter CIA Agent Jack O’Donnell (Bryan Cranston – Total Recall, Rock Of Ages) who turns to one of his top operatives, Tony Mendez (Ben Affleck – To The Wonder, The Town) to come up with a believable story. However when Tony gets famous producer John Chambers (John Goodman – Flight, Trouble With The Curve) and director Lester Siegel (Alan Arkin – Arigo, The Muppets) on board to try and trick the Iranian Government into thinking that Hollywood is about to film a sci-fi blockbuster in their country it is up to O’Donnell to try and get a list of people including Hamilton Jordon (Kyle Chandler – Super 8, TV’S Friday Night Lights) to see that this far-fetched plan could actually work.

While many have criticized Ben Affleck for some of the poor acting roles he has filmed over the years you certainly can’t criticise his directing skills. With films like Gone Baby Gone and The Town under his belt Affleck cemented himself as one of the most exciting directors going around. Argo tops any of them though and shows Affleck is in fact one of the most talented directors that Hollywood has ever seen.

Few directors manage to present suspense to their audience in the way that Affleck does with Argo. So tense are the scenes at the airport that the audience are on the edge of their seat yet Affleck still makes the film completely natural, he never milks it for theatrical effect and as a result the audience at the Melbourne media screening was so impressed they broke out into a round of applause… something that rarely happens with modern films.

The naturalistic feel to Argo enhances many scenes and when you see photographs of the actual events (and the people that took part in them) you can see that Affleck has gone for a brand of perfection that just goes to show what a fine director he really is.

Argo is a guaranteed Oscar winner and will go down in history as one of the finest movies ever made.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Argo′: http://www.helium.com/items/2384900-movie-reviews-argo-2012 Also check Episode #5 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Argo’

Rating: 5/5

IMDB Rating: Argo (2012) on IMDb