Monthly Archives: June 2021

Summary:  Following the events at home, the Abbott family now face the terrors of the outside world. Forced to venture into the unknown, they realize the creatures that hunt by sound are not the only threats lurking beyond the sand path.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates: 27th May 2021 (Australia), 24th June 2021 (Thailand), 3rd June 2021 (UK), 28th May 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: USA

Director: John Krasinski

Screenwriter: John Krasinski

Cast: Emily Blunt (Evelyn Abbott), Chad Corbi (Jim Chimney), Wayne Duvall (Roger), Djimon Hounsou (Man On Island), Noah Jupe (Marcus Abbott), John Krasinski (Lee Abbott), Scoot McNairy (Marina Man), Cillian Murphy (Emmett), Millicent Simmonds (Regan Abbott)

Running Time: 97 mins

Classification: M (Australia), 13 (Thailand), 15 (UK), PG-13 (USA)

OUR A QUIET PLACE PART II REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ A Quiet Place Part II Review:

Cinemas are back open and the movies are back with a BANG! There has been no ‘slow-opening’ when it comes to blockbusters being released with one of the most eagerly anticipated films of the year opening this week… after a delay of exactly a year (thanks Covid!!!).

Back in 2018 genre film fans were shocked when real-life husband and wife team John Krasinski (TV’S The Office) and Emily Blunt (Edge Of Tomorrow) brought their passion project, titled A Quiet Place, to the big screen. The film itself was a virtual cinematic masterpiece and fans begun asking for a sequel almost straight-away. Now that sequel has landed with A Quiet Place Part II and once again those fans are going to be enthralled.

Part II picks up exactly where the original film left off. The subsequent fire, thanks to the finale of Part 1, sees Evelyn Abbott (Blunt) and her kids, Regan (Millicent Simmonds – Wonderstruck) and Marcus (Noah Jupe – Honey Boy), seeking shelter elsewhere while the creatures still hunt them down whenever they make a noise.

They soon find shelter in an old mill alongside family friend, Emmett (Cillian Murphy – Inception), but when Regan finds a radio transmission on her father’s radio she becomes insistent that the group travel to where the feed is being transmitted from. She soon makes it known that if the others don’t follow her she is willing to go it alone.

It becomes very obvious early on with Part II that as a filmmaker Krasinki wanted to makes this film bigger and better than the original but without losing that ‘indie’ feel that was so obvious in the first film – and to his credit he manages to do that. The opening sequence which is a short prequel to the event is mind-blowing – brilliantly directed and still has a small town feel to it which makes it perfect fodder for those that love shows like Stranger Things.

From there though the film returns to the almost slower pace that made the first film so special. The film focuses on characterisation whether it be the audience being frustrated at behaviour of Marcus that often puts his family at risk or the emotional growth that we see from Regan this time around. The fact that the people behind the camera also had the sense to risk a large portion of this film being carried by young Millicent Simmonds pays off as well.

Simmonds is brilliant in this film and often steals scenes from her more experienced co-stars like Emily Blunt. She uses her deafness to her advantage in her portrayal of her character on screen and some of the film’s most important and memorable moments are played out with her alongside Cillian Murphy. Both Murphy and Simmonds are also made look even better by Krasinski and his cinematographer, Polly Morgan (Lucy In The Sky), who frequently give small nods to cult classics like Alien throughout the film.

The real key to A Quiet Place Part II working so well as a film though is the fact that Krasinski never allows this film to give in to the cheesiness that Hollywood so often feels like these films need. There are no tacky, throw-away lines placed into the film to try and get a cheap life and there are certainly none of those laughable jump scares that seem to litter horror and sci-fi films these days. It is obvious that Krasinski has learnt his craft by watching the films of the masters – directors like Spielberg, Carpenter and Scott, and thankfully for fans of the genre their work is mirrored in his.The Quiet Place Part II is better suited to those that have already seen the original film. While the flashback at the start of the film does do enough to give newcomers a bit of back-story once the film comes back to the current day there are things that happen that would only be understood by those who have seen the original. The great news is that for fans of the original this is a more than worthy watch and it reveals Millicent Simmonds as a future star in a role that is now truly memorable.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Kyle McGrath’s A Quiet Place Part II Review:

A Quiet Place was the 2018 surprise hit film directed by John Krasinski and starring himself and real world wife Emily Blunt as Lee & Evelyn Abbott, parents to Regan and Marcus played by Millicent Simmonds and Noah Jupe. Largely set a year and a half after strange brutal monsters have wiped out most of humanity by attacking anything which makes a sound. The film followed the Abbotts as they try to make a literal quiet life for themselves on their farm in this new world of terror as they expect the birth of a new child. One day a series of events lead to the family being stalked by at least one of these creatures (there are 3 in the area), during which Evelyn gives birth, Lee is killed and Regan, a deaf teenager, discovers that the hearing aid her father made for her while it doesnt help her hearing emits such a frequency that weakens the monsters impervious shell allowing for the family to finally take down the creature with aide of a shotgun. The film ends with a cliffhanger as 2 more monsters race to investigate the explosive sound.

A Quiet Place part 2 picks up directly after these events,  besides a flashback, where Evelyn, her 2 children and newborn infant are forced to flee their farm in search of aide and a new place to call home. They quickly come into contact with Emmett (Cillian Murphy) a neighbour with his own tragic story and former friend of the Abbotts in the old world. Upon hearing a radio broadcast the survivors set out to see if they can reach the source and if with Regan’s earpiece they might be able to honour her father Lee by providing some sort of larger scale fight back against these, until now, seemingly unbeatable monsters.

A Quiet Place was a movie that i personally didnt enjoy nearly as much as many others did. I found it to be a film with quite an interesting premise and being set in a world where characters had to remain as silent as possible I was really interested to see how it played out. Unfortunately while the movie featured a talented cast of actors, impressive special effects and effective jump scares the writing and world building I found somewhat lacking & hurt the believability of the film.

The thing which bothered me most watching the movie was that while I found John Krasinski had done an amazing job in taking a horror story of such an odd nature with little to no spoken dialogue and making it work extremely well, the film by its very nature almost encouraged the audience to think “why dont they do this, why dont they do that”. Some of this second guessing is inevitable with a genre film such as this but here was a movie with great actors, looked amazing and incredibly was never boring despite such long and silent moments when one could argue not much was happening. However I have to assume that most of the audience would like me be thinking about what they would find themselves doing in a situation such as the Abbotts found themselves in and this is just sitting in the audience for 90 minutes, rhe Abbotts have been living in this world for a year and a half and we see the story opens with the death of one of their children. If we the audience can think “maybe they should be living near that waterfall which provides cover for sound” maybe the Abbotts should have thought of these things as well. If I would carry around an egg timer or, hell, even a rock just to throw to the side to privide some sort of distraction for these blind creatures who hunt by sound maybe Lee Abbott should be as well.

It was an interesting movie and I was impressed that it made for such a unique cinema going experience where the audience feels the need to keep as quiet as possible like say a deep sea movie would encourage us to hold our breath. Some parts of the film I quite liked such as the family having a deaf daughter and knowing sign language, rather than this being a ridiculous coincidence I saw it as a reason that the Abbotts have survived so long, they already knew how to communicate with each other silently. But as the plot contrivances and holes began to pile up I couldn’t find ways to explain them all away.

A Quiet Place 2 however I found to be a different case. A lot more is happening here with much of the film surprisingly not focusing as much on Emily Blunt’s character but on Regan and Emmett as they go on a quest of there own to reach what they hope will be a settlement and more survivors. The question is would they be people worth saving.

Despite the original film’s cliche’d “she cocks the shotgun and it cuts to credits” apparent sequel bait ending I can 100% believe that John Krasinski is being honest when saying that they never intended to make a sequel. Reason being is remember those 2 monsters that were racing to destroy whatever had made that shotgun blast? Well they both disappeared from existence which makes watching this movie as some sort of double feature quite humorous indeed as an immediate threat is set up only to be instantly forgotten about. Having the remaining Abbotts quickly dispatch 2 monsters in the film’s opening when a single creature had stalked them the entire previous movie may have nerfed the central threat of the series a little but still Kathy Bates’ character from Misery would be pissed at such inconsistency.

A lot of this movie is put on the shoulders of both Cillian Murphy and especially Millicent Simmonds. Simmonds as Regan trying to do what her father would have done and Murphy as Emmett a man who has lost everything, including possibly his mind, needing to protect his dead friend’s daughter both provided incredible performances which more than carry the film. Cillian Murphy is one of the most talented actors of his generation and fits well into his role giving us a character we’re not sure if we can trust or not.

Emily Blunt somewhat falls to the side in this film which is a pity but while the last film’s theme of protecting one’s children suited her having a much more substantial role, this film’s theme of children growing up and leaving the nest means it wouldnt have worked here. On that note in fact I was somewhat disappointed that the character of Marcus and Evelyn’s roles in the latter half of the film had been exchanced. Not to give anything away but this movie features a scene that makes the previous films stepping on a nail look preferable. The result is that Marcus is forced to stay mostly in one location taking care of a newborn while Evelyn goes in search of medical supplies. I couldnt help but think both their actions could have been swapped around with Evelyn being in the unfavorable position of having both her son and daughter out in the wild with her unable to do anything to help them. Especially considering that Marcus’ character arc in this film, not to mention the whole “leaving the nest” theme, would have fit better had he been the one forced by circumstances to be the protector rather than the one being protected.

The film has plenty more going on in it this time than in the last film. The characters moving from one location to another rather than the entire film being set in one fortified location also avoids the issues I had with world building in the previous movie. The characters act in a more believable way as they are thrust into dangerous situatuons that occur naturally rather than preventable situations they should have prepared for.

As the narratives split to 3 different focal points throughout the story it must be said that a credible job is done to seemlessly jump from one storyline to another without awkwardness or lapses in tone. As tension builds with Marcus exploring his surroundings and not knowing what he will find or what will jump out at him it also is gearing up with Regan and Emmett on their quest.

Once again the movie makes for an incredibly tense cinema going experience. It really goes to show Krasinski’s ability as a director that he can have 100s of people sitting in a room deathly silent on the edge of their seats too afraid to be the one to disturb the quiet by crinkling a bag of crisps and woe betide anyone who forgot to put their phones on silent as they’ll earn the scorn of an entire cinema moreso than usual.

Rarely do I find myself enjoying a sequel as much or more than the original and even more rarely do I find myself such a fan of a sequel to a film I didnt really care for. A Quiet Place Part 2 like Happy Death Day 2U is one of those freak occurrences. I was surprised when this movie got pushed so far forward from its initial 2020 release date with no question of an on demand release. However with its small and talented cast directed with an impressive eye for tension and jump scares this is a genre film the likes of which deserves to be seen on the big screen as much as any huge blockbuster. The interesting premise of the original film is still going strong here and I’m interested to see where the franchise could go from here.

Kyle’s rating Out Of 5:

Lee Griffiths’s A Quiet Place Part II Review:

Lee’s rating Out Of 5:

Average Subculture Rating:

IMDB Rating:

A Quiet Place Part II (2020) on IMDb

Other Subculture A Quiet Place Part II Reviews:

Nil.

Trailer:

Summary:  A bereaved woman seeks out a new life, off the grid in Wyoming.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates: 22nd April 2021 (Australia), 4th June 2021 (UK), 12th February 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: USA, Canada

Director: Robin Wright

Screenwriter: Jesse Chitham, Erin Dignam

Cast: Demian Bichir (Miguel), Warren Christie (Adam), Kim Dickens (Emma), Brad Leland (Colt), Mia McDonald (Elki), Sarah Dawn Pledge (Alawa), Finlay Wojtak-Hissong (Drew), Rikki-Lynn Ward (Kayla Big Bear), Robin Wright (Edee)

Running Time: 89 mins

Classification: M (Australia), 12A (UK), PG-13 (USA)

OUR LAND REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Land Review:

It is kind of ironic that Robin Wright’s directional debut, Land, is being released in Australia on the same day as Kelly Reichardt’s First Cow because the two’s directional styles are alarmingly similar. Just like Reichardt has done throughout her career I have to say that Wright has delivered a masterpiece with Land.

The tale is simple – yet heartbreaking. Edee (Robin Wright – Forrest Gump) is a woman in turmoil. She is haunted by recent traumatic events to the point where she flirts with suicide every day. While she attends counselling sessions they don’t seem to be helping her at all, so in the end she decides to pack up her life and move to an isolated hut in the middle of the wilderness in Wyoming.

While Edee is determined to be completely off the grid, despite the warnings from locals, she finds that life is tough and soon has to accept help from local hunter Miguel (Demian Bichir – The Hateful Eight) to learn how to live off the land.

I found Land to be a work of true beauty. Not just because Wright and her cinematographer Bobby Bukowski (Arlington Road) manage to capture the American wilderness with its true beauty but because this is a simple exploration of the human soul and the emotions that it goes through. While Hollywood likes to talk about ‘strong female characters’ and then list the likes of Wonder Woman or Lara Croft what Land delivers is perhaps one of the strongest female characters we have ever seen grace the big screen.

Wright’s Edee is strong, passionate and wants to overcome the extremely traumatic hand that life has dealt her. As an audience member I found myself taken on that journey with her. I love the fact that the screen-play doesn’t just hand deliver all the answers to the audience throughout the film. The audience do have to ‘work’ during this film – miss one but of dialogue and you may miss something important to Edee’s life and yes you will be taken through an emotional wringer with this film. There were times when tears came to my eyes during some of the film’s ‘tougher’ moments and there were times that I chuckled as well. I found that Land is heartbreaking but also amazingly uplifting as well.

Wright’s directional style only enhances this film even more. Like Reichardt she tells the story in a pure naturalistic way. Even as a rookie director she knows that you don’t need dialogue to tell a story, a look or even the environment around an actor or actress can sometimes say more than a whole page worth of dialogue. The fact that Wright already knows that with her first film tells me that she is going to be a director that is going to be exciting to watch over the next couple of decades.

I think what I liked about this film though is that nothing feels forced. Wright along with the work of screenwriters Erin Dignam (Loved) and newcomer Jesse Chatham avoids every single Hollywood cliché with this movie. Going into the film I was wondering whether the inclusion of Demian Bichir in the film would see the film dip into a Mills & Boon style romance, but luckily my fears were misplaced.Land is very much the perfect film.

A gripping storyline delivered with amazing performances from both Wright and Bechir and scenery that makes you want to escape to the wilderness yourself sees Land become the type of film that stays with you for a long, long time. I found the power of this film to be a truly amazing cinematic experience and if you loved Reese Witherspoon’s Wild then this film is a must see for you. Land is a cinematic masterpiece.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Kyle McGrath’s Land Review:

Kyle’s rating Out Of 5:

Average Subculture Rating:

IMDB Rating:

Land (2021) on IMDb

Other Subculture Land Reviews:

Nil.

Trailer:

Today, Disney+ debuted “Meet Sylvie,” a new featurette for Marvel Studios’ “Loki” featuring Sylvie, the extremely capable and dangerous variant who just happens to be another version of Loki. Watch the new “Loki” featurette to find out more about her and Sophia Di Martino, the talented actress who brings her to life.
 

“Loki,” Marvel Studios’ newest original series, launched on Disney+ Wednesday, June 9, with new episodes streaming every Wednesday through July 14.
 

Marvel Studios’ “Loki” features the God of Mischief as he steps out of his brother’s shadow in a new series that takes place after the events of “Avengers: Endgame.” Tom Hiddleston returns as the title character, joined by Owen Wilson, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Sophia Di Martino, Wunmi Mosaku and Richard E. Grant. Kate Herron directs “Loki,” and Michael Waldron is head writer. 

 ILY FIlms today confirmed that their latest action thriller, Out of Death, is set to be released on Digital Download from August 2nd and on DVD from Octover 4th. Directed by Mike Burns, who makes his feature film debut, 

Out of Death stars the legendary action icon Bruce Willis (Die Hard), Jaime King (Sin CityMy Bloody Valentine) and Lala Kent (Hard KillVault). Still grieving the untimely death of her father, photojournalist Shannon Mathers (Jamie King) spreads his ashes in the woods when she witnesses a cop (Lala Kent) shooting and killing an unarmed henchman during a drug deal. She captures the whole scene on her camera before being discovered. Shot at, scared, helpless and on the run, she races her way through the woods with no recognition of her location.

Distracted by the violent noise of the attack, Jack Harris (Bruce Willis) a newly retired police officer who is relaxing at his cabin, saves Shannon just in time and the two narrowly escape into the woods. Not sure of whom she can trust, as more dirty cops arrive to help hunt her down, including the brutal town sheriff Hank Rivers (Michael Sirow), she decides to rely on Jack, her only real chance to fight back the corrupt police and bring it to justice.

Director of ILY FIlms, Richard Lechartier, says “We are delighted to be releasing Out of Death in the UK. It’s a tense action-packed thriller and we are sure the audiences will love seeing Bruce Willis back to his best”.Out of Death will be available on Digital Download from August 2nd and DVD from October 4th.

Directed by Jeffrey Walker and starring Christoph Waltz, Sam Neill, Patrick Gibson, Miranda Otto, Chris Pang, Jessica DeGouw, Rachel House, Arka Das, Damon Herriman and Sophie Wilde, the Stan Original Film The Portable Door is a magical fantasy adventure and is currently in production in Queensland.

 Stan, Australia’s unrivalled home of original productions, today announced a brand new Stan Original Film, The Portable Door, a magical fantasy adventure which is currently in production in Queensland.

The film will see two-time Oscar winner Christoph Waltz (Django Unchained, No Time to Die) and multi-Golden Globe nominee Sam Neill (Peter Rabbit, Jurassic Park franchise) star alongside Patrick Gibson (The OA, Tolkien) and an all-star Australian cast, including Miranda Otto (The Lord of the Rings franchise), Chris Pang (Crazy Rich Asians), Jessica DeGouw (Gretel & HanselPennyworth), New Zealand’s Rachel House (Soul, Thor: Ragnarok), Arka Das (MulanLion), Damon Herriman (Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood, Stan Original Series The Commons) and Sophie Wilde (Stan Original Series Eden, You Don’t Know Me).

Adapted from Tom Holt’s eponymous seven-book fantasy series, award-winning Australian director Jeffrey Walker (Ali’s Wedding, Stan Original Series The Commons) is directing the film from a screenplay adapted by Australian writer Leon Ford (Griff the Invisible).

Jim Henson Company and Story Bridge Films production, The Portable Door is produced by Blanca Lista from The Jim Henson Company (Alexander and the Terrible Horrible No Good Very Bad Day, The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance), and Todd Fellman from Story Bridge Films (DaybreakersBait 3D). The Jim Henson Company’s Lisa Henson and Chris Lytton are executive producing as well as Arclight Films’ Gary Hamilton, Brian Beckmann, and Ying Ye, alongside Julia Stuart and Laura Grange from Sky, and Stan’s Cailah Scobie and Shana Levine. Madman Entertainment will handle theatrical distribution, ahead of the film’s premiere on Stan.

In The Portable Door, Paul Carpenter (Patrick Gibson) and Sophie Pettingel (Sophie Wilde) are the lowly, put-upon interns who begin working at the mysterious London firm J.W. Wells & Co. and become steadily aware that their employers are anything but conventional. Charismatic villains Humphrey Wells (Christoph Waltz), the CEO of the company, and middle manager Dennis Tanner (Sam Neill) are disrupting the world of magic by bringing modern corporate strategy to ancient magical practices, and Paul and Sophie discover the true agenda of the vast corporation where they work.

Stan Chief Content Officer Cailah Scobie said: “Stan continues its strong investment and focus on premium local programs and feature films like The Portable Door as part of our strategy to create more Australian produced content. Helmed by one of Australia’s most accomplished directors in Jeffrey Walker and featuring award winning actors Christoph Waltz, Sam Neill and Patrick Gibson, alongside a stellar Australian cast, we look forward to seeing this magical film cast a spell on Stan subscribers.”

Madman Entertainment CEO and Founder Paul Wiegard said: “The film promises a joyful cinematic experience; a big screen visual feast of imagination, fantasy and humour.  Audiences will recapture, uninterrupted, that feeling from their youth of watching a truly creative work.”

Executive producer Lisa Henson said: “Director Jeffrey Walker is leading an amazing cast and creative team to bring to life the high-fantasy setting and unique humour of The Portable Door. An unexpected adventure filled with deeply funny moments; The Portable Door is poised to be the next Henson fan favourite.”

Producer Todd Fellman said: “It has been exciting to watch the diverse comedic talents of our incredible cast take this gem of a script by Leon Ford to a whole new level. We are truly creating a very special film that will be lots of fun for audiences of all ages.”

Financing and distribution partners include Sky Studios, Stan, Madman Entertainment, MEP Capital, Fulcrum Media Finance and Arclight Films International. Development and production support provided by Screen Queensland.

The Stan Original Film The Portable Door is currently in production, with further announcements to come.

New Era Entertainment will be releasing MEDUSA across the US and Canada on 6th July and UK July 19th 2021. The film will receive a full home entertainment release, with a day-and-date DVD and Premium TVOD, followed by a full digital release. The film is a modern take on the mythological female creature ‘Medusa’ and tells the story of a young woman, who is bitten by a lethal snake and starts experiencing unusual changes to her senses and appearance. As she sheds her old skin, she will stop at nothing to get what she wants, as she slowly morphs into a deadly weapon.

 Strong female cast includes Megan Purvis (The Young Cannibals, Don’t Knock Twice, Hilda), Sarah T. Cohen (HellKat, The Witches, The Viking War) Nicola Wright (The Gardener, Perfect 10, Silent Place) and Nicole Nabi (Cannibal Troll, Hatched). Matthew B.C directed and co-wrote the film alongside Scott Jeffrey. Medusa was produced by UK production house Jagged Edge Productions. Devilworks acquired Worldwide rights and will be selling to International buyers at the Marche’s physical event in Cannes (July 6th-15th).

Summary:  Set against the backdrop of the opioid epidemic, stories of an undercover cop, a professor, and a grieving mother collide in this dramatic thriller from writer/director Nicholas Jarecki.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates: 18th March 2021 (Australia), 26th February 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: 5th March 2021 (USA)

Country: Canada, Belgium

Director: Nicholas Jarecki

Screenwriter: Nicholas Jarecki

Cast: Paul Aharani (Customs Inspector Fournier), Rodney Alexandre (Frankie), Benz Antoine (Detective Carson), Michel Aranov (Minas), Eric Bruneau (Guy Broussard), Bill Bryk (David Reimann), Charles Champagne (Cedric Beauville), Jay Chevery (Agent E. Thomas), Lily-Rose Depp (Emmie Kelly), Martin Donovan (Lawrence Morgan), Charles Ebbs (Franklin), Luke Evans (Dr. Bill Simons), Veronica Ferres (Dr. Meg Holmes), Tony Garrn (Sarah), Alex Gendreau (Davidson), Nouella Grimes (Dean Sharon Jones), Armie Hammer (Jake Kelly), Nicholas Jarecki (Stanley Foster), Marcel Jeannin (Harold Morgan), Daniel Jun (Jun), Hiro Kanagawa (Dr. Ishiyama), Kid Cudi (Ben Walker), Greg Kinnear (Dean Talbot), Mia Kirshner (Susan), Hugo B. Lefort (Billy – RCMP), Evangeline Lily (Claire Reimann), Duke Nicholson (Derrick Millebran), Gary Oldman (Dr. Tyrone Brower), Michelle Rodriguez (Supervisor Garrett), Noah Ruscica (Simon Gilcrest), Sara Sampaio (Ines), Frank Schorpion (Coach Vogel), Linda E. Smith (Anne), Kwasi Songui (Red), Ellora Torchia (Reeva), Admen Tsekhmen (Armen), Indira Varma (Madira Brower)

Running Time: 118 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia), 15 (UK), R (USA)

“Dreamland” Day06, Photo: Jan Thijs 2019

OUR CRISIS REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Crisis Review:

I do love big action blockbusters as much as the next film fan, but I have to admit that I wish all blockbusters were like Crisis. This has everything that I want in a blockbuster – suspense, good acting and a script that has been well thought and plotted out by its screenwriters. It is also doesn’t need to have an explosion or a car chase in every scene to keep the interest going.

The well written script is the work of screenwriter/director Nicholas Jarecki (Arbitrage) who uses the backdrop of the opioid epidemic in the USA as a way for the stories of three characters living three very different lives to collide.

First there is Jake Kelly (Armie Hammer – The Lone Ranger) who is working undercover in a bid to bring down both one of the biggest importers and largest exporters of opioids coming across the US and Canadian border. While he is stepping along a very dangerous line he feels that he is now being rushed by his superior (Michelle Rodriguez – The Fast & The Furious) which may bring everything crashing down in the case.

Then there is Claire Reimann (Evangeline Lilly – Ant-Man) who is a recovering opioid addict who is just trying to get her life back on track when suddenly she leans that there is a possibility that her son’s disappearance may have something to do with the murky underworld of Detroit.

Last but certainly not least is Dr Tyrone Brower (Gary Oldman – The Dark Knight) a well-respected professor at a University that relies on grants and paid research work to keep going. When he and his students are asked to test a new addictive-free drug that a pharmaceutical company is planning on releasing they find it is not as addictive-free as the company believes. What happens when he confronts the company about his findings soon finds him under a threat that he could never have predicted.

The brilliance of Crisis all starts with the writing of Jarecki. I’ll admit that I became a fan of his after his amazing film Arbritage blew me away back in 2012. With that film Jarecki created an under-rated suspenseful thriller that brought out the best of its cast which included Richard Gere, Susan Sarandon and Brit Marling. With Crisis Jarecki recaptures that magic.

To say that Jarecki has created a slow-burn thriller with Crisis is an understatement. This isn’t a film fuelled by suspense through action, Jarecki and his cast can get just as much suspense out of scene with Kelly in a bar with a gangster or Brower sitting at a board-room meeting when his future is being determined then most director/screenwriters can get out massive robot fights or stunning car chases. As a director Jarecki also knows how to use his environment to his advantage and by teaming up with cinematographer Nicolas Bolduc (War Witch) he uses the snowscapes of Canada and Detroit to bring a harshness to the film that further enhances the bleakness told in the story.

Also like Arbritage is the fact that Jarecki’s screenplay here brings out the best in the film’s cast. For a long time I have seen Armie Hammer as a pretty-boy actor. While his looks lend him well to roles such as the ones he has had in The Man From U.N.C.L.E. and The Lone Ranger his acting range has been lacking. Here though Hammer shines as a drug agent in over his head – finally it seems like he found an acting role where he could showcase his acting talent sadly at a time when his career maybe at the crossroads.

The screenplay here also sees Evangeline Lilly steps up as a distraught mother trying to overcome her past demons with an emotional performance that once again reminds us of her acting abilities outside franchises. Also brilliant here is Gary Oldman, but then when isn’t he brilliant? Here he uses his theatrical training to great effect and he is sensational in some of the film’s more suspenseful scenes.

I should also point out though that I did find a flaw with this film. It did feel like the film tried to bring in too many characters. Characters like Kelly’s drug addicted sister Emmie (Lily-Rose Depp – Yoga Hosers) seem superfluous and just make the film run a little longer than it really should. All in all though Crisis is a must see thriller for cinema-goers out there that like a good slow-burn thriller.

A beautifully written script lends its hand to some great acting performances with a film that reminds us that often the line between pharmaceutical companies and drug dealers is often blurry.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Kyle McGrath’s Crisis Review:

Kyle’s rating Out Of 5:

Average Subculture Rating:

IMDB Rating:

Crisis (2021) on IMDb

Other Subculture Crisis Reviews:

Nil.

Trailer:

Summary: An intelligent 15-year-old high school student is unexpectedly transferred to a boarding school where he opens a portal of monsters from another dimension.

Year: 2020

Cinema Release Dates: 24th June 2021 (Australia)

VOD Release Dates: 12th April 2021 (UK)

Country: Mexico, UK, Canada

Director: Leopoldo Aguilar

Screenwriter: Bob Barlen, Cal Brunker

Cast: Jamie Bell (Danny (voice)), Dimsy Dohanji (John-Turd (voice)), Ruby Rose (Liz (voice))

Running Time: 85 mins

Classification: PG (Australia), PG (UK), PG (USA)

OUR CRANSTON ACADEMY: MONSTER ZONE REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Cranston Academy: Monster Zone Review:

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Average Subculture Rating:

IMDB Rating:

Monster Zone (2020) on IMDb

Other Subculture Cranston Academy: Monster Zone Reviews:

Nil.

Trailer:

This August, Oscar® winner Jordan Peele unleashes a fresh take on the blood-chilling urban legend that your friend’s older sibling probably told you about at a sleepover: Candyman. Rising filmmaker Nia DaCosta (Little Woods) directs this contemporary incarnation of the cult classic.  

For as long as residents can remember, the housing projects of Chicago’s Cabrini-Green neighborhood were terrorized by a word-of-mouth ghost story about a supernatural killer with a hook for a hand, easily summoned by those daring to repeat his name five times into a mirror. In present day, a decade after the last of the Cabrini towers were torn down, visual artist Anthony McCoy (Yahya Abdul-Mateen II; HBO’s Watchmen, Us) and his partner, gallery director Brianna Cartwright (Teyonah Parris; If Beale Street Could TalkThe Photograph), move into a luxury loft condo in Cabrini, now gentrified beyond recognition and inhabited by upwardly mobile millennials.

With Anthony’s painting career on the brink of stalling, a chance encounter with a Cabrini-Green old-timer (Colman Domingo; HBO’s Euphoria, Assassination Nation) exposes Anthony to the tragically horrific nature of the true story behind Candyman. Anxious to maintain his status in the Chicago art world, Anthony begins to explore these macabre details in his studio as fresh grist for paintings, unknowingly opening a door to a complex past that unravels his own sanity and unleashes a terrifying wave of violence that puts him on a collision course with destiny.

Universal Pictures presents, from Metro Goldwyn Mayer Pictures and Jordan Peele and Win Rosenfeld’s Monkeypaw Productions, in association with BRON Creative, Candyman. Candyman is directed by DaCosta, and is produced by Ian Cooper (Us), Rosenfeld and Peele. The screenplay is by Peele & Rosenfeld and DaCosta. The film is based on the 1992 film Candyman, written by Bernard Rose, and the short story “The Forbidden” by Clive Barker. The film’s executive producers are David Kern, Aaron L. Gilbert and Jason Cloth.