Tagged: Dustin Clare

 

SHELTER, a new curated global streaming platform for architecture, design, lifestyle and outdoor living content launches on July 31, bringing together quality films, television series and the exclusive Shelter Originals: Inspired Architecture series.  The innovative new platform has partnered with global magazines Design Anthology and Green Magazine among others, to host and present premium video content from these distinctive international brands.

 

SHELTER creator Dustin Clare said “Design is at the centre of our lives – from our homes and environment, to our aspirations, our holidays and our escapes, and there are so many films and TV series which explore our relationship to our space. With a passionate audience for this genre SHELTER was created as the premium home of quality curated video content.”

 

“The reality of lockdown has made us re-examine our connection to home, our immediate environment, and the world around us. Through SHELTER, we invite you to explore, be inspired, be entertained and engrossed, and most of all, be engaged with the world of architecture, design, lifestyle and outdoor living.”

 

“With a genuine focus on sustainability content on our platform we have partnered with Eden Reforestation Projects, a non-profit org established to reduce poverty and restore healthy forests in countries devastated by deforestation. Each month a tree will be planted to represent every subscriber, with a view to us and each of our subscribers planting many thousands of trees where they are most needed” he said. 

 

This interactive cross-platform approach to content marks a new standard for streaming platforms, delivering a range of fascinating ‘must-watch’ options from feature length films to television series, snackable short series and premium magazine content.  

 

The carousel encompasses stories of inspiring design and architecture, a deep dive into sustainability, history, and real life aspirational stories, and features famous faces including Charlie Luxton, Dermot Bannon, Tim Ross, Sarah Beeney and more. 

 

One of SHELTER’s exclusive offerings is its Inspired Architecture Series. These 6 x 15 minute episodes commissioned by Shelter explore six uniquely Australian structures including JR’s Hut in Gundagai, Permanent Camping in Mudgee and Hart House at Great Mackerel Beach. All in their own way inspirational and isolated, the series explores the narrative of the buildings and their creators, and draws the viewer into an active exploration of modern architecture and design. Each episode includes interviews with the Architects and their commissioning clients, cinematically shot and crafted by award-winning filmmaker Jim Lounsbury (The Meaning of Vanlife, The Infinite Lens).

 

Curated from Australia, New Zealand, Europe, United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada, United States and South America, SHELTER will feature more than 200 hours of content available July 31, with new content to be added every month. Highlights available from July 31 include:

 o        Festival favourite Tadao Ando: From Emptiness to Infinity (2013) pays homage to one of the world’s most renowned architects: the Japanese ‘Master of Minimalism’ Tadao Ando. The film introduces viewers to his famous buildings and offers an exclusive look into his work process, inspiration and motivations.

o        Winner of Best Documentary at the Atlas Awards International Film Festival, Don Freeman’s Art House (2016) is a film which thoughtfully explores the homes of eleven creatives and examines the integration of their craft with their living spaces including the labyrinthine sculptural home @eliphante.village , hand crafted by Michael Kahn and Leda Livant over the 28 year period of their relationship, beginning in 1979.  

o        Winner of the Green Planet Award at the Rhode Island International Film Festival Tiny (2013) is a film about dreaming big and living small. Many are now choosing to focus on flexibility, financial freedom, and quality of life over quantity of space. These self-proclaimed “Tiny Housers” live in homes smaller than the average parking space, often built on wheels to bypass building codes and zoning laws. Tiny takes us inside six of these homes stripped to their essentials, exploring the owners’ stories and the design innovations that make them work.

o        The documentary film Do More With Less (Hacer Mucho Con Poco) (2017) explores the new wave of architecture being developed by contemporary Ecuadorian designers in South America, with creative new ways of existing in the post-financial crisis world. The film is an inspiring look at the future of architecture and the potential for an alternative economic model to exist – one characterised by social, economic and environmental awareness.

o        Microtopia (2013) is a documentary that explores how architects, creatives and home owners are pushing the limits of portability, sustainability and minimalism in our dwellings. The film received a Hone of Tomorrow Special Mention @Cinemambiente Torino

o        Strange and Familiar: Architecture on Fogo Island.(2014) In a rapidly urbanised world, what does the future hold for traditional rural societies? This is a film about Fogo Island, a small community off the coast of Newfoundland. As the island struggles to sustain its unique way of life in the face of a collapse of its cod fishing industry, architect Todd Saunders and social entrepreneur Zita Cobb’s vision for positive change results in the designing and building of strikingly original architecture that will become a catalyst for social change.

o        Harry Seidler: Modernist (2017), a retrospective celebration of the life and work of Australia’s most controversial architect. Sixty years of work is showcased through sumptuous photography and interviews with leading architects from around the world.

o        Ken Roche – The Quiet Architect (2017) is a feature documentary film that considers many of the key architectural questions through the 70 year career of Pritzker Prize winning Irish-American architect Kevin Roche, including the relationship between architects and the public they serve. Still working at age 94, Kevin Roche is an enigma, a man with no interest in fame who refuses retirement and continually looks to the future regardless of age.

o        The Edge of the Possible (1998) charts the dramatic course of the creation of a masterpiece and includes a rare interview with Jørn Utzon as he reflects on his role in the compelling story of the conception and construction of the Sydney Opera House

o        Feature film Gray Matters (2014) explores the fascinating life and complicated career of architect and designer Eileen Gray, whose uncompromising vision defined the practice of modernism in decoration, design and architecture. Today, with her work commanding extraordinary prices and attention, her legacy, like its creator, remains elusive, contested and compelling. Directed by Marco Orsini “Does justice to a life less ordinary.” – Dwell Magazine @dwellmagazine 

o        Homo Sapiens (2016) is a film about the finiteness and fragility of human existence and the end of the industrial age, and what it means to be a human being. What will remain of our lives after we’re gone? Empty spaces, ruins, cities increasingly overgrown with vegetation, crumbling asphalt: the areas we currently inhabit, though humanity has disappeared. “As gripping as any sci-fi thriller… If the spirit of Stanley Kubrick lives in any current film-maker, it is surely the Austrian director Nikolaus Geyrhalter.” The Guardian Winner of the Wild Dreamer Awards for Best Documentary at the Subversive Festival Zagreb. 

o        Life Architecturally is an intimate documentary that follows internationally acclaimed husband and wife team, architect Robert McBride and interior designer Debbie Ryan, to discover what inspires their groundbreaking architectural concepts and designs

o        Dream Build seasons 1 & 2 follows Australians who have been lucky enough to turn the dream of building their own home into a spectacular reality. Each owner shares their experience of throwing down ambitious briefs to their architect. The architect will discuss their process and how they rose to the challenge of giving their client not only the home but also the lifestyle of their dreams.

o        TV series Charlie Luxton’s Homes by the Sea follows architectural designer and television presenter @charlierluxton as he travels along Britain’s stunning coastline in search of the most outstanding coastal architecture he can find.

o        Winner of Best Feature Film at the Green Lens Environmental Film Festival Growing Cities is a film which explores the importance of such sustainable, locally grown agriculture in an urban setting. Filmmakers Dan Susman and Andrew Monbouquette speak to people who are challenging the way we grow and distribute food, one vacant city lot, rooftop garden, and backyard chicken coop at a time.

o        Living the Change: Inspiring Stories for A Sustainable Future (2018) Inspiring stories of people pioneering change in order to live in a sustainable and regenerative way.

o        Visual Acoustics (2008) Narrated by Dustin Hoffman and winner of the Audience Awards at Palm Springs and Austin Film Festivals, Visual Acoustics explores the life and career of Julius Shulman, widely regarded as the greatest architectural photographer, whose images brought to light the architectural modernist movement. Shulman’s work played a significant role in promoting the careers of legendary architects such as Frank Lloyd Wright and Frank Gehry. 

o        Herman’s House (2012) ‘What kind of house does a man who has been imprisoned in a six-foot-by-nine-foot cell for over 30 years dream of?’ This film captures the remarkable creative journey and friendship of Herman Wallace, one of the Angola 3, and artist Jackie Sumell while examining the injustice of prolonged solitary confinement.

o        The Art of Architecture (2019) Spend some time with some of the greatest works of architecture the world has ever seen, and find out how art has influenced the great designers of our time.

o        Streets of Your Town (2015) with comedian, broadcaster and architecture enthusiast Tim Ross. A two-part series focusing on the aesthetics of our suburbs.

SHELTER GIVES BACK

Shelter has partnered with Eden Reforestation Projects for every paid subscriber each month we plant a native tree through our certified not for profit reforestation partner, Eden Reforestation Projects, who reduce extreme poverty and restore healthy forests by employing local villagers to plant millions of trees every year in some of the most impoverished and environmentally devastated regions of the world.

 

GREEN MAGAZINE LIMITED TIME LAUNCH OFFER

Every new paid subscriber receives the most recent digital issue of Green magazine free. 

Offer runs until September 30.

 

MORE INFORMATION

 

New content launched each month. 

14 day free trial  

Monthly subscription:

AUD $7.99

NZD $8.99

USD $5.99

EURO €4.99

GBP £4.99

 

Download the SHELTER APP for iOS and Android from 31 July or watch online. 

 

Register now for updates and more information at www.shelter.stream

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Logo

This week on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Adam, Dave, Greg and Nick take a look at new release films ‘Avengers: Age Of Ultron,’ ‘Frackman,’ ‘Testament Of Youth,’ ‘Boychoir,’ ‘Touch,’ and ‘Sunday′ . This episode also contains interviews with Dustin Clare, Michelle Joy Llord and Francois Gidard.

Also make sure you listen to the show if you would like to win a copy of Hell On Wheels thanks to Icon Distribution on DVD.

To listen to the show you can download it for free from our Podcast Channel – Listen/Dowload here.

Sunday

Summary: Set in Christchurch twelve months after the devastating earthquake that flattened a lot of the city, Sunday sees the very Aussie Charlie (Dustin Clare) arriving to visit his ex-girlfriend Eve (Camille Keenan). The catch here is that their once flourishing relationship is now in tatters but Eve is pregnant with Charlie’s baby.

As Charlie awkwardly tries to be there for Eve he is soon shocked to learn that she has moved on with Stephan (Jacob Tomuri). Soon he is left wondering whether he can simply just be friends with Eve and just be a Dad to her child or whether like the city around them this is something that can be re-built.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 2nd May, 2015

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: New Zealand/Australia

Director: Michelle Joy Lloyd

Screenwriter: Dustin Clare, Camille Keenan, Michelle Joy Lloyd

Cast: Dustin Clare (Charlie), Camille Keenan (Eve), Jacob Tomuri (Stephan), Steve Wrigley (The Entertainer)

Runtime: 71 mins

Classification: MA15+

 

OUR SUNDAY REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

The danger with doing a largely dialogue driven film is that in the hands of the wrong filmmaker they can become a dangerously slow affair that could potentially put an audience into a deep coma. Luckily for all involved with Sunday the small team behind this independently produced New Zealand film is that they were right on the money and have created a wonderfully written relationship drama that should be the envy of any Hollywood screenwriter.

Director Michelle Joy Lloyd announces herself as one of Australia’s brightest young directional talents as she takes the script written by herself and real life and on-screen couple Camille Keenan and Dustin Clare and turns it into a thought provoking relationship drama that well and truly draws its audience in. Delivering all the angst and strong writing of an episode of The Secret Life Of Us Sunday allows it’s audience to sit back and be taken on an emotional journey that is aided by the fact that both Charlie and Eve likable characters. It is easy to see that this is the kind of film where a male audience will be able to easy identify with Charlie and a female audience put themselves in the shoes of Eve.

At times Sunday does become very dialogue driven but luckily the screenplay is so well written that the film never feels like it is being bogged down by being too wordy. And somehow the film manages to conjure about great suspense and tension through strong scenes between Charlie and Eve that any couple can relate to. Somehow the screenplay also manages to remain realistic throughout and thankfully never becomes some flowery romance that makes you want to gag. The script’s ability to tie in the story of a relationship rebuild with how Christchurch is rebuilding and not giving up around them is also a stroke of screenplay mastery.

Making Sunday even stronger are the genuine performances from both Dustin Clare and Camille Keenan. The real life couple bring a strong chemistry to their performances and credit must be paid to Keenan who actually filmed this one pregnant. The limited time period that they had to shoot the film does not show in their performances and instead we get two good performances that show that both these actors deserve much meatier roles in the future. Hopefully Sunday will be enough to elevate them off the small screen and onto the big screen.

Sunday is the kind of film that is best enjoyed by somebody that likes intelligent cinema and doesn’t need a load of explosions or CGI to keep them happy in the cinema. It is well thought out, well acted and a film that deserves to go a long, long way.

Stars(3.5)

 

 

Greg King:

You can read Greg’s full Sunday review on www.filmreviews.net.au

Stars(3)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3.5)

 

IMDB Rating: Sunday (2014) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Sunday reviews: You can also find our Sunday review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt. You will also be able to hear our Sunday review on an upcoming episode of The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show.

Trailer:

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Logo

This week on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Adam, Dave, Greg and Nick take a look at new release films ‘While We’re Young,’ ‘The Heckler,’ ‘The Longest Ride,’ ‘The Gunman,’ ‘The Age Of Adaline,’ ‘Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2,’ and ‘It Follows′ . This episode also contains interviews with Ben Stiller, Scott Eastwood, Britt Robertson, Blake Lively, Harrison Ford, Kevin James, Maika Monroe, Daniel Zovatto and Markos Rounthwaite.

We also talk to Richard Todd about Frackman, Chris Houghton about Touch, Dustin Clare and Michelle Joy Lloyd about Sunday, while comedian Miles Allen stops by to tell us about One Man Breaking Bad.

To listen to the show you can download it for free from our Podcast Channel – Listen/Dowload here.

Sunday - Dustin Clare

Subculture Entertainment’s Dave G chats to actor Dustin Clare about his brand new film Sunday. Talk ranges from the difference between working on a show like Spartacus to a small independent film to what does it feel like when your off-screen partner plays your on-screen partner.

You can listen to or download our Sunday – Dustin Clare interview right here.

Goddess

Summary:  Elspeth Dickens dreams of finding her voice despite being stuck in an isolated farmhouse with her twin toddlers. A web-cam becomes her pathway to fame and fortune, but it comes at a price.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 14th March, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Australia

Director: Mark Lamprell

Screenwriter: Mark Lamprell, Joanna Weinberg

Cast: Tamsin Carroll (Deb), Dustin Clare (Rory), Lucy Durack (Cherry), Corinne Grant (Fizz), Hugo Johnstone-Burt (Ralph), Ronan Keating (James Dickens), Laura Michelle Kelly (Elspeth Dickens), Cameron Lyon (Neil), Sean McGee (Kurt), Pia Miranda (Sophie), Magda Szubanski (Cassandra Wolfe), Natalie Tran (Helen)

Runtime: 104 mins

Classification: PG

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Goddess’ Review: Check Episode #24 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Goddess’.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Performance′: Nil.

Subculture Media Interviews for ‘Goddess’: Interview with various cast members of ‘Goddess’ can be found here.

Rating: N/A

IMDB Rating:Goddess (2013) on IMDb