Tagged: Star Wars: The Force Awakens

HARLEY WOODSHarley Woods pic

Harley is a creative talent who has lived in an amazing world inside his head since childhood (and a slightly less amazing one in the “real world” – wherever that is). Obsessed with creativity and storytelling he developed an interest in theatre, performing and writing early on and went on to study Professional Writing & Editing, where he met David Griffiths and others who formed Subculture Media / Subculture Entertainment.

In past years, Harley has also studied and dabbled in filmmaking and media, multimedia and drama.

In 2001 he started helping out with the production of “Sonic Screwdriver” – the fan club magazine of the Doctor Who Club of Victoria and quickly became the Art Director. As Art Director of the ‘zine he helped with editing and created the layout and design and the majority of the artwork included in the issues during his tenure. He was also responsible for comic strips and occasional articles printed therein and was the regular reviewer of Doctor Who related media being released at the time.

More recently, Harley has leased himself out as a freelanced artist, writer and editor. He is currently working on comic strips for release online and is developing comic book ideas (both solo and with David Griffiths) and productions for TV, film and audio; all the while dreaming of recording his music to one day release to the world.

 

Currently Harley Woods has 9 reviews on Subculture Entertainment:

 

Currently Harley Woods appears on 6 episodes of Subculture: The Podcast

Academy Awards

The 2016 Oscar nominations have been announced. The big winner who have scored multiple nominations include The Revenant (12 nominations), Mad Max: Fury Road (10), The Martian (7), Bridge Of Spies (6), Carol (6), Spotlight (6), The Big Short (5), Star Wars: The Force Awakens (5), The Danish Girl (4), Room (4), Brooklyn (3), The Hateful Eight (3), Sicario (3), Ex Machina (2), Inside Out (2) and Steve Jobs (2).

And the nominations are:

 

BEST MOTION PICTURE OF THE YEAR

The Big Short

Brooklyn

Bridge Of Spies

Mad Max: Fury Road

The Martian

The Revenant

Room

Spotlight

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

Bryan Cranston (Trumbo)

Matt Damon (The Martian)

Leonardo DiCaprio (The Revenant)

Michael Fassbender (Steve Jobs)

Eddie Redmayne (The Danish Girl)

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

Cate Blanchett (Carol)

Brie Larson (Room)

Jennifer Lawrence (Joy)

Charlotte Rampling (45 Years)

Saoirse Ronan (Brooklyn)

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

Christian Bale (The Big Short)

Tom Hardy (The Revenant)

Mark Ruffalo (Spotlight)

Mark Rylance (Bridge Of Spies)

Sylvester Stallone (Creed)

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

Jennifer Jason Leigh (The Hateful Eight)

Rooney Mara (Carol)

Rachel McAdams (Spotlight)

Alicia Vikander (The Danish Girl)

Kate Winslet (Steve Jobs)

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN DIRECTING

Adam McKay (The Big Short)

George Miller (Mad Max: Fury Road)

Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu (The Revenant)

Lenny Abrahamson (Room)

Tom McCarthy (Spotlight)

BEST WRITING, SCREENPLAY WRITTEN DIRECTLY FOR SCREEN

Matt Charman, Ethan Coen, Joel Coen (Bridge Of Spies)

Alex Garland (Ex Machina)

Pete Docter, Meg Lefauve, Josh Cooley, Ronnie Del Carmen (Inside Out)

Josh Singer, Tom McCarthy (Spotlight)

Andrea Berloff, Jonathan Herman, S. Leigh Savidge, Alan Wenkus (Straight Outta Compton)

BEST WRITING, SCREENPLAY BASED ON MATERIAL PREVIOUSLY PRODUCED OR PUBLISHED

Charles Randolph, Adam McKay (The Big Short)

Nick Hornby (Brooklyn)

Phyllis Nagy (Carol)

Drew Goddard (The Martian)

Emma Donoghue (Room)

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE FILM OF THE YEAR

Anomalisa

O Menino e o Mudno

Inside Out

Shaun The Sheep Movie

Omoide no Mani

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM OF THE YEAR

El Abrazo De La Seripiente

Krigen

Mustang

Saul Fia

Theeb

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN CINEMATOGRAPHY

Edward Lachman (Carol)

Robert Richardson (The Hateful Eight)

John Seale (Mad Max: Fury Road)

Emmanuel Lubezki (The Revenant)

Roger Deakins (Sicario)

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN EDITING

Hank Corwin (The Big Short)

Margaret Sixel (Mad Max: Fury Road)

Stephen Mirrione (The Revenant)

Tom McArdle (Spotlight)

Maryann Brandon, Mark Jo Markey (Star Wars: The Force Awakens)

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN PRODUCTION DESIGN

Adam Stockhausen, Rena DeAngelo, Bernhard Henrich (Bridge of Spies)

Eve Stewart, Michael Standish (The Danish Girl)

Colin Gibson, Lisa Thompson (Mad Max: Fury Road)

Arthur Max, Celia Bobak (The Martian)

Jack Fisk, Hamish Purdy (The Revenant)

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN COSTUME DESIGN

Sandy Powell (Carol)

Sandy Powell (Cinderella)

Paco Delgado (The Danish Girl)

Jenny Beavan (Mad Max: Fury Road)

Jacqueline West (The Revenant)

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING

Love Larson, Eva Von Behr (Hundraaringem Som Klev Ut Genom Fonstret Och Forsvann)

Lesley Vanderwalt, Elka Wardega, Damian Martin (Mad Max: Fury Road)

Sian Grigg, Duncan Jarman, Robert A Pandini (The Revenant)

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN MUSIC WRITTEN FOR MOTION PICTURES, ORIGINAL SCORE

Thomas Newman (Bridge Of Spies)

Carter Burwell (Carol)

Ennio Morricone (The Hateful Eight)

Johann Johannsson (Sicario)

John Williams (Stars Wars: The Force Awakens)

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN MUSIC WRITTEN FOR MOTION PICTURES, ORIGINAL SONG

‘Earned It’ – The Weekend, Belly, Jason ‘DaHeala’ Quenneville, Stephan Moccio (Fifty Shades Of Grey)

‘Til It Happens To You’ – Diane Warren, Lady Gaga (The Hunting Ground)

‘Manta Ray’ – J. Ralph, Antony Hegarty (Racing Extinction)

‘Writing’s On The Wall’ – Sam Smith, James Napier (Spectre)

‘Simple Song #3’ – David Lang (Youth)

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN SOUND MIXING

Andy Nelson, Gary Rydstrom, Drew Kunin (Bridge Of Spies)

Chris Jenkins, Gregg Rudloff, Ben Osmo (Mad Max: Fury Road)

Paul Massey, Mark Taylor, Mac Ruth (The Martian)

Jon Taylor, Frank A. Montano, Randy Thom, Chris Duesterdiek (The Revenant)

Andy Nelson, Christopher Scarabosio, Stuart Wilson (Star Wars: The Force Awakens)

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN SOUND EDITING

Mark A. Mangini, David White (Mad Max: Fury Road)

Oliver Tarney (The Martian)

Martin Hernandez, Lon Bender (The Revenant)

Alan Robert Murray (Sicario)

Matthew Wood, David Acord (Star Wars: The Force Awakens)

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN VISUAL EFFECTS

Andrew Whitehurst, Paul Norris, Mark Williams Ardington, Sara Bennett (Ex Machina)

Andrew Jackson, Tom Wood, Dan Oliver, Andy Williams (Mad Max: Fury Road)

Richard Stammers, Anders Langland, Chris Lawrence, Steven Warner (The Martian)

Richard McBride, Matt Shumway, Jason Smith, Cameron Waldbauer (The Revenant)

Roger Guyett, Pat Tubach, Neal Scanlan, Chris Corbould (Stars Wars: The Force Awakens)

BEST DOCUMENTARY, FEATURE

Amy

Cartel Land

The Look Of Silence

What Happened, Miss Simone?

Winter On Fire

BEST DOCUMENTARY, SHORT SUBJECT

Body Team 12

War Within The Walls

Claude Lanzmann: Spectres Of The Shoah

A Girl In The River: The Price Of Forgiveness

Last Day Of Freedom

BEST SHORT FILM, ANIMATED

Historia de un oso

Mi ne mozhem zhit biz kosmosa

Prologue

Sanjay’s Super Team

World Of Tomorrow

BEST SHORT FILM, LIVE ACTION

Ave Maria

Day One

Alles Wird Gut

Shok

Stutterer

DAVID GRIFFITHS

 

Dave Griffiths

Dave Griffiths has worked as a journalist for over twenty years now -covering topics including film, television, music, travel and sport (with a main focus on AFL Football).

That time has seen him host the popular X-Wired television program for seven seasons as well as write for various magazines such as Buzz Magazine, Heavy Mag, Stage Whispers, The Banner and Eternity. Dave is currently the Head Film Writer for Heavy Mag and also writes reviews for Thailand’s The Phuket News newspaper.

He has even branched out into writing online for Subculture Entertainment, Media Search and The Book The Film The T-Shirt. He also worked as the online editor for Entertainment 360 for three years.

Dave’s radio work has seen him work on various radio stations including Talking Lifestyle, 2GB Talk Radio, ,3RPP, Triple R and Light FM. He is currently the co-host of Melbourne’s 94.1FM’s breakfast show ‘The Motley Crew’ and he can sometimes be heard on J-Air’s ‘First On Film’. David is also the co-host of two popular podcasts – ‘The Good, The Bad, The Ugly Film Show,’ and ‘The Popcorn Conspiracy’

As far as Film Reviewing goes David is an elected committee member of AFCA (Australian Film Critics Association and a member of IPRESCI (International Federation of Film Critics)/FIPRESCI (Fédération Internationale de la Presse Cinématographique).

He has also served as a jury member for a number of international film festivals and is considered an expert on cult cinema, horror movies and Australian films.

Dave is also a keen screenwriter and is currently working on a new comic book series.

 

Currently David Griffiths has 109 Film & TV Reviews on Subculture Entertainment

 

Currently David Griffiths has 86 Film Interviews on Subculture Entertainment

 

Currently David Griffiths has 26 Music Reviews on Subculture Entertainment

 

Currently David Griffiths has 165 Music Interviews on Subculture Entertainment

 

 

Currently David Griffiths has 21 Theatre/Comedy Interviews on Subculture Entertainment

 

 

Currently David Griffiths features on 31 episodes of The Popcorn Conspiracy

 

 

 

 

Currently David Griffiths features on 5 episodes of SUBCULTURE: THE PODCAST

 

 

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Logo

This week on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Adam, Dave, Greg and Nick take a look at new release films ‘Mississippi Grind,’ and ‘Star Wars: The Force Awakens’. This episode also contains an interview with Kristy Matheson who stops by to chat about ACMI’s Summer Series of films.

The boys also give you another chance to enter our brand new competition thanks to our friends at Icon Films. Icon have given us an Australian DVD Pack (made up films – Last Cab To Darwin, Strange Bedfellows, Rabbit Proof Fence, Two Hands, Oranges & Sunshine and The Black Balloon) to giveaway to celebrate the launch of Last Cab To Darwin on DVD and Blu-Ray. To win listen out for the question during this week’s show and then hit us up on Facebook with the answer.

To listen to the show or can download it for free from our Podcast Channel – Listen/Download here.

NICK GARDENER

 

Nick Gardener

After years as a devoted listener of radio station RRR and its legendary programmes such as “Fast Fictions” and “Danger Low Brow”, Nick decided to try his hand at presenting a music, film review and popular culture show.  That programme was “Built for Speed” which has aired every Friday night from 8-10pm on 88.3 Southern FM for over 18 years.  On “Built For Speed”,  Nick and co-presenters CJ and Jim review new release films, play a mix of new and old alternative music and direct a critical (and hopefully amusing) eye at all things pop cultural.

In 2012, Nick teamed up with three of Melbourne’s finest film reviewers: David Griffiths, Greg King and Adam Ross, to present the weekly podcast “The Good the Bad and the Ugly”.  The podcast is all about movies with the team reviewing the week’s new cinema releases and DVD’s and diving into the history of film with their weekly and highly contentious discussion point.

Nick can also be heard reviewing new release movies at 7:30am every Wednesday morning on “The Wednesday Motley Crew” a programme presented by the aforementioned Dave, Greg and Adam on 3WBC 94.1FM Whitehorse Boroondara Community Radio.

Over the years, Nick has also contributed film, gig and CD reviews to publications such as Inpress magazine, The Weekly Times and The City Weekly.  In addition, Nick, CJ and Jim were regular presenters on RRR graveyard shifts and filled in for numerous specialist music shows on RRR.

 

Currently Nick Gardener has 7 reviews on Subculture Entertainment.

 

GREG KING

Greg King2

Greg King has had a life long love of films. He has been reviewing popular films for over 15 years. Since 1994, he has been the film reviewer for BEAT magazine. His reviews have also appeared in the Herald Sun newspaper, S-Press, Stage Whispers, and a number of other magazines, newspapers and web sites.

Greg also hosts Movies At Dusk on 3WBC 94.1FM every Sunday between 7-7pm. The two hour show includes interviews with film makers, reviews and news from the world of film and entertainment. he also co-hosts the breakfast show The Wednesday Motley Crew with David Griffiths every Wednesday morning between 7-10am on 3WBC 94.1FM.

Greg also presents film reviews regularly on Terry Phibbs’ Dusk program every Sunday at 6.30pm on 3WBC 94,1FM and at 2.30pm as part of Peter Cassidy’s Saturday Afternoon Program.

He was the producer of Media Moves Cinema Scene, heard every Saturday morning from 11.00am to 12 noon, on radio station 3CR in Melbourne.

Greg is also the secretary of the Australian Film Critics Association.

When not viewing movies, Greg’s other passions include reading, listening to music, and the St Kilda football club.

 

Currently Greg King has 12 reviews on Subculture Entertainment

 

ADAM ROSS

Adam Ross

Adam has worked in the video industry for ten years, he has decided (for our benefit) to stop squandering his encyclopaedic knowledge of film on the average ‘Blockbuster’ patron and has taken up refuge at The Aristocrat.

His love for film was expanded exponentially when he watched a VHS tape of David Fincher’s Fight Club at a friend’s party. He asked if he could borrow the tape overnight, he then went home and watched the film three times back-to-back; that was ten years ago. It was at this moment that he realised films where things to be debated, marvelled at and studied.

Now, his main objective is to pass on the passion of film to others; to change people from apathetic sheep in the candy bar to ravenous cinephiles who await quality cinema, across all genres. Adam is The Aristocrat’s straight man (in more than one context). Adam is a member of the Australian Film Critics Association and you can also find his reviews on www.rottentomatoes.com

 

Currently Adam Ross has 7 reviews on Subculture Entertainment.

 

5 Stars

The Diary Of A Teenage GirlTHE DIARY OF A TEENAGE GIRL

WildWILD

4.5 Stars

Good KillGOOD KILL

AmyAMY

4 Stars

Star Wars The Force AwakensSTAR WARS: THE FORCE AWAKENS

LoveLOVE 3D

SicarioSICARIO

Terminator GenisysTERMINATOR GENISYS

FeaturePretty Good FriendsPRETTY GOOD FRIENDS

InfiniINFINI

Avengers; Age Of UltronAVENGERS: AGE OF ULTRON

It FollowsIT FOLLOWS

The GamblerTHE GAMBLER

3.5 Stars

PanPAN

The VisitTHE VISIT

OddballODDBALL

GirlhoodGIRLHOOD

3 Stars

Alvin & The Chipmunks Road ChipALVIN AND THE CHIPMUNKS: ROAD CHIP

London RoadLONDON ROAD

Blinky Bill The MovieBLINKY BILL THE MOVIE

TangerineTANGERINE

Paper TownsPAPER TOWNS

Ant-ManANT-MAN

Pitch Perfect 2PITCH PERFECT 2

Fifty Shades Of GreyFIFTY SHADES OF GREY

The Wedding RingerTHE WEDDING RINGER

2.5 Stars

Daddy's HomeDADDY’S HOME

Ruben GuthrieRUBEN GUTHRIE

The HeckerTHE HECKLER

Taken 3TAKEN 3

2 Stars

Magic Mike XXLMAGIC MIKE XXL

Penguins Of MadagascarPENGUINS OF MADAGASCAR

Neil Johnson

Neil Johnson is one of the hardest working directors going around so we decided to have a chat to him about his new projects Rogue Warrior: Robot Fighter, Doomsday and Starship: Apocalypse. So here it is – our Neil Johnson interview

 

  1. Neil, first off how hectic have been the last few years for you and where do the great film ideas keep coming from? There aren’t too many directors out there that can say that they have got three films coming out it just over a 12 month period. What keeps you going?

 

I don’t have a day job.  Whether I eat or not depends on whether I make a film that people want to buy copies of.  There is a strange attitude in the world at the moment that artistic media should be free.  Once… you paid a ticket and saw a movie, or bought a VHS or DVD.  Now everyone thinks they have the right to download something for free, even though the major studio may have spent $100 million creating that product.  It affects the lower end of the industry even more than the upper tier.  If I walked into a store and walked out with a Blu Ray under my arm, I would be arrested. If a person walks into my virtual home and steals my movie, is that supposed to be OK?  For me to be able to eat and pay rent, I have been forced to increase my output.  I work day and night without rest.  And then to have some moron download the film for free, share it with his friends and then to attempt to review the film comparing it to something that cost $100 million is disheartening.  The $5 million films have almost vanished.  The $1 million films have vanished.  There is only big and small.  The market is changing and I have been forced to change along side it.  My film output MUST be 3-4 films a year, just so I can pay my rent.  It is hard to create something of quality under that pressure, but I sure do try!

 

 

  1. You’ve made a name for yourself in the sci-fi genre over the last few years. Can you tell us a little bit about when your love for sci-fi first began? What were some of the first films that you feel in love with? What fascinates you with the genre?

 

Science fiction is always about hope.  It gives me an exciting feeling when I think of flying spaceships, going to new worlds and having adventures.   We are trapped on this planet.  If a giant asteroid were to come, we’d be gone in an instant…. All would be lost… art, culture, consciousness.  For all we know, we could be the only conscious entity in this galaxy.  We owe it to our own existence to get off-world.  Religion is such a pitiful thing.  It leaves us locked on a planet living a lie.  Science Fiction is our future, because it is the impetus that propels us forward.  I was always into Sci-Fi since the age of 2.   The Neil Armstrong on the moon thing warped my young mind.  I was into films like 2001, Star Wars, Quiet Earth, Silent Running, Planet of the Apes.  I so wanted to be an astronaut going on adventures.

 

  1. Why do you think that sci-fi has always remained such a popular genre and why do you think people who love it are so passionate about it?

 

It is popular because it keeps evolving.  Science Fiction isn’t just Flash Gordon, or Star Trek, or BSG, or Interstellar.  It is a notion that anything is possible.  It is pure speculation fuelled with imagination.  Whatever your personal flavor, Science Fiction caters for you.  There isn’t one person who doesn’t like at least one Science Fiction film, is there????

 

  1. When did you first decide that you wanted to make films, and how did you start out?

 

I was making films at 16, as soon as my balls dropped.  Prior to that I was writing stories and building full-sized spaceships, time machines and space weapons.  I went to film school and kind of rebelled and did what I thought was right.  I worked in television making commercials and documentaries, and short films on the side.  By the mid 90’s I was running a production house making hundreds of thousands a year.  I gave it all up to make films.  Some say it was my downfall, but I have never been happier.

 

  1. So let’s start with the first film Doomsday. You wrote and directed the film, tell us a little about the film, where the idea came from and how you were able to put together such a great cast?

 

Yes, it is a wonderful cast!  Doomsday is a time-travel film set between now and 400 years in the future.  It tells the story of a man, Achillies, who is thrust back in time, infected with a terrible disease.  He is pursued by a hybrid human cyborg, who destroys the cities of York and London in an effort to destroy his target.   People are already complaining that it is not as big budget as my other films, but others are saying how refreshing a film it is compared to everything else.   I know people like to watch it more than once to see what is really going on. It came out of a low point in my life.  My best friend died, as well as a few other terrible things happening.  I was stranded in the UK for a few months, so I decided to make a film from a script that had been kicking around.  Darren Jacobs, who was starring in another film, Starship:Rising and the sequel Starship: Apocalypse, helped me by finding some other amazing British actors, like himself.  The film was shot with relative ease across England.  One of my smaller budgets, but it represents a great freedom in being able to decide to do a film, and not needing anyone to green-light anything.  In contrast, doing my recent 2 Starship films was a more painful birthing process.   The films cost a bit, and myself, being the guy who did the world’s first digital film, wanted to do a film almost entirely on green screen, and have it finished in 4K resolution.  These are massively epic stories, and a few have commented since that maybe these films are too epic for such a modest budget.  The point is, I always try and improve my films.  I know the films that are currently in post production, Rogue Warrior: Robot Fighter and At The Edge of Time are both miles above Starship and Doomsday in so many ways.

 

 

  1. Doomsday went through a couple of name changes, from Chrononaut to Death Machine and then to Doomsday can you tell us why that has happened? Also does changing the name of a film cause problems with the marketing?

 

Yes, changing the name is really not smart.  I liked Chrononaut.  It was unusual… but in the average movie-goer world, who wants to watch a film with a name like that… so I was informed…  So I was urged to change the name to Death Machine, but the distributer response was lack-luster, so some of the territories we sold to called the film Doomsday.  Kind of a mess really, but I take it all with a smile.  If I ever do a director’s cut then the film will be called Chrononaut.

 

  1. Doomsday recently picked up an award at the Temecula Film Festival, as a creative person how does winning an award make you feel? Do you feel happy that your work is being recognized in such a way?

 

Awards like that kind of hit you when you aren’t expecting it.  You work so hard and you forget so much of what is going on around you… suddenly people start to have respect for your work.  I am not making films for others, it is for myself, so it makes me happy that people give something an award without even trying.  They asked to screen the film and suddenly they handed me an award.  It was a great thrill.  Starship: Rising, my previous film showed at the Action On Film festival run by Del Weston.  We won 4 ½ awards there as well, which was a real surprise.  I was just happy to be getting a screening.

 

  1. Okay, moving onto the next film – Starship Apocalypse – you just released the teaser trailer, how was it received? Do you feel nervous when a trailer is first put out to the public?

 

I haven’t really pushed the teaser too much.  When the proper trailer hits, I expect a lot of chatter to start.  I always get nervous about anything released but to be honest, I don’t have an interest to read reviews.  They are almost universally negative and I have no interest to read these comments.

 

 

  1. So tell us a little bit about Starship Apocalypse. Was there always a plan to make a sequel to Starship Rising or did the idea generate after how well the first film was received? What challenges does making a sequel provide for a writer/director?

 

I actually shot both films back to back.  I always wanted it to be a 3-hour epic movie.  People were a little confused by film 1, but after they see film 2, they finally get it all.  Eventually I want to package both films as 1 big story with some extra scenes (already shot) that will make the whole story more uniform.

 

  1. I guess the big question is do you have any plans for a third movie in the Starship series?

 

Not exactly.  But Rogue Warrior: Robot Fighter takes place in the same universe.  There is a character from the Starship series, Roartak, who is mentioned in the film.  If I did a third film, for sure it would be set 10 years later.

  1. Moving along to the film that has everybody talking, Rogue Warrior: Robot Fighter, tell us a little about how you came up with this movie and what it was like working on it?

 

It was really a lot of fun.  I teamed up with Tracey Birdsall and we shared a love of robots.  I am all into the ideas of what happens when Artificial Intelligence gets so big that it takes over.  20% is set on Earth, the rest is on other planets.  I was so happy to be out on location shooting rather than being cooped up in the studio.  I know that my D.P., Kyle Wright was happy about this.  I really hope he gets some cinematography awards for this.  We shot mostly in California but also a bit in Arizona and Australia.  The film has a whole new feel from my previous films.  It is much more of a practical film.  It has kind of come out like Star Wars: The Force Awakens blended with Mad Max: Fury Road.  Kind of strange considering when we shot the film, nether of these entities existed in the public eye.  I just did what I wanted to do.  It think there is sometimes a creative consciousness that permeates.  Many of us film-makers wanted to get back to being practical rather that relying on CG.

 

  1. The film seems to be generating a cult following online before it is even released why do you think that has happened? Do you feel like that puts more pressure on you?

 

Hell yeah, there is pressure on me.  Even day a giant screw up my ass turns ever so slowly.  But all I want to do is create a work of art.  Right now the film is at over 2 hours, and I need to tighten it.  The cult following has to do with Tracey Birdsall and her wacky-sexy costumes, and also the fact that she can actually act.  There is a real sense of character in this.  We didn’t plan this.  We just leapt into what we wanted to do.  There is a great reason why Tracey’s character wears what she does, but you will have to see the film for the answers.

 

  1. Tell us about the amazing cast you were able to put together for Robot Fighter, what made you choose the cast you did? We recently spoke to Tracey Birdsall about the film and she said you were great to work with, what was she like to work with?

 

When you look at a woman like Tracey you think that she would be a real princess, but in fact she is tougher than most of the male actors out there.  She likes to fight and roll and run and leap, and kill robots.  One day she was covered in almost 100 bruises from all the fighting action.  I know she works out hard with one of the big trainers in Malibu, Diamond Russ, and he takes great pride in pushing her to looked as ripped as she can.  There is a scene in the film where she is sorta naked, and you can see how lean and ripped she really is.

 

Then, we had Daz Crawford, who is known for Blade 2, a James Bond villain, etc, and he is also ripped, and he can act as well… which is wonderful.  He is an amazing guy from the UK, who I would love to work with again.  He inspires me to go to the gym more often.  We also had Stephen Manly who played young Spock in Star Trek 3.  It was sad that Leonard Nimoy passed while we were shooting. Stehphen Manley carries a lot of heart and soul in his performance.  All the actors we chose, Tim McGrath(Stuck), Ashley Park (Miss Korea 2015), Erin Bethia (Fireproof), Livvy Stubenrauch (Disney’s Frozen) were all chosen because they could act with great character arcs and some real truth.  Originally I wanted Rogue Warrior to have a kind of Red Dwarf comedy feel, but it got a little too serious along the way.

 

  1. Neil, thanks for your time. Is there anything else you want your fans to know before they head out to check out these films?

 

Don’t be too hard on me.  I am just a hard–working guy who tries to make great films in a depressed market.  Also check out Humanity’s End, and old film of mine that I love.  Starship: Apocalypse hits the shelves in the UK in late September and in the US in December.  Rogue Warrior VERY early 2016.

 

Hail and Kill  !