Tagged: Thomas Mann

Summary: 
The saga of Michael Myers and Laurie Strode continues in the next thrilling chapter of the Halloween series.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates:  28th October 2021 (Australia), 11th November 2021 (Thailand), 15th October 2021 (UK), 15th October 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: USA, UK

Director: David Gordon Green

Screenwriter: David Gordon Green, Danny McBride, Scott Teems

Cast: Airon Armstrong (The Shape – 1978), Dylan Arnold (Cameron Elam), Ross Bacon (Tivoli), Charlie Benton (Officer Richards), Haluk Bilginer (Dr. Ranbir Sartain), Nick Castle (The Shape), Lenny Clarke (Phil), Salem Collins (Christy), James Jude Courtney (The Shape), Jim Cummings (Pete McCabe), Jamie Lee Curtis (Laurie Strode), Charles Cyphers (Leigh Brackett), Omar J. Dorsey (Sherriff Baker), Brian F. Durkin (Deputy Graham), Judy Greer (Karen), Anthony Michael Hall (Tommy Doyle), Robert Lee Harvey (Tom F.F. Bentley), Tanya Jacobson (Tanya Jacobson), Tom Jones Jr. (Dr. Samuel Loomis), Jacob Keohane (Deputy Tobias), Nacy Kyes (Annie Brackett), Ryan Lewis (Deputy Sullivan), Robert Longstreet (Lonnie Elam), Scott MacArthur (Big John), Colin Mahan (Dr. Samuel Loomis (voice)), Thomas Mann (Young Hawkins), Andi Matichak (Allyson), Brian Mays (Brian The Bartender), Michael McDonald (Little John), Carmela McNeal (Vanessa), Tony Moran (Michael Myers), Jibrail Nantambu (Julian), Bob Odenkirk (Bob), Christian Michael Pates (Young Michael Myers), Will Patton (Officer Hawkins), Kyle Richards (Lindsay), Drew Schneid (Oscar), Michael Smallwood (Marcus), P.J. Soles (Lynda), Nancy Stephens (Marion), Diva Taylor (Sondra), J. Gaven Wilde (Dennis), Giselle Witt (Mindy)

Running Time: 105 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia), 18 (UK), R (USA)

OUR HALLOWEEN KILLS REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Halloween Kills Review:

Why would anyone want to make a movie that fits into the universe of a timeless classic? I’ve thought about that a lot over the years, and even after hearing the excitement in producer Jason Blum’s voice when I interviewed him about the last Halloween film didn’t make it any clearer for me. Sure I get that excitement stemmed from the fact that Blum had always dreamt of making a Halloween but part of him must of wondered whether or not it would be worth the comments from the haters out there who were only too ready to troll once the film was released.

To Blum and director David Gordon Green’s (Stronger) credit the first film is this trilogy was probably the best Halloween film since Halloween H20 and it introduced the fan-base to a more modern and brutal take that was certainly not the re-make that so many haters out there were expecting.

Now comes the difficult second child in the trilogy and it is a bit of a double-edged sword. While Green ups and the violence and gore this time around to make it one of the most graphic and gruesome Halloween films it does suffer from what I call ‘second-film syndrome’ in that the ending of the film is so focussed on setting up things for the third film that it seems to forget that audiences deserve something decent to finish things this time around.

Halloween Kills starts where its predecessor ends. Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis – True Lies), her daughter Karen (Judy Greer – Ant-Man) and her grand-daughter Allyson (Andi Matichak – Orange Is The New Black) are being treated in hospital after luring Michael Myers into his fiery trap, however the trap failed and after Myers battles with the first responders he heads into town once again looking for his nemesis.

In town though everything has gone crazy. While Officer Hawkins (Will Patton – Armageddon) tries to not only hunt down Myers and restore calm to the town a group of vigilantes led by Tommy Doyle (Anthony Michael Hall – The Dark Knight) have decided that enough is enough and that the only way to end Myer’s murderous rampage is with some old-fashioned mob justice. The result is a catastrophic turn of events where nobody is safe.

There were so many things about Halloween Kills that I loved. Michael vs The First Responders is a classic Halloween moment that is going to be long remembered by fans of the series – it also may well be David Gordon Green’s legacy stamp on the franchise. I also loved the fact that instead of just introducing random characters that nobody has ever seen, or care about, into the battle with Michael that Green has gone back and chosen characters that have appeared in the franchise in the past to re-appear. That not only shows Green’s love of the material that his expanding on but also adds something a little special for true fans of the franchise.

That decision actually results in one of most memorable moments of the entire franchise as actor Anthony Michael Hall steals the show as Tommy Doyle. Hall’s performance mirrors what the town is going through – the anger, the determination and the hope that they can finally be rid of Michael once and for all. His performance here is something that Hall should be incredibly proud of.

I also loved the fact that the events of the film seem to mirror what has happened in recent American history. The vigilante group looking for justice and the mass panic at the hospital seemed to be ripped straight out of newspapers with what happened with the storming of the Capitol Building and some of the recent riots in the US. It is moments like that that make you realise that Green has been very capable with bringing this franchise into the modern day and you can’t help but wonder if he wasn’t making a sneaky comment about modern day American society with some of the scenes depicted throughout the film.

What I didn’t like though, aside from the limp ending, was that it felt like the film wasted the talents of Jamie Lee Curtis. While it would have been unbelievable to have her fit and spry after the events of the last film it did feel like she was wasted being bed-ridden for a majority of the film. At least if the believability of the film did need her in hospital then perhaps the film could have used the fact that she is a sitting, wounded duck waiting for the hunter better as a suspense mechanism.

Overall though Halloween Kills does work as a film though. There are some truly memorable scenes in the film that will be forever etched into horror folklore while the creative kills and extra gore make sure the film is above many of the sub-standard horror films out there on the market. Now all I can say is bring on the finale.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Average Subculture Rating:

Other Subculture Halloween Kills Reviews:

Nil

Trailer:

In 2018, David Gordon Green’s Halloween, starring icon Jamie Lee Curtis,killed at the box office, earning more than $250 million worldwide, becoming the highest-grossing chapter in the four-decade franchise and setting a new record for the biggest opening weekend in history for a horror film starring a woman.

And the Halloween night when Michael Myers returned isn’t over yet. 

Minutes after Laurie Strode (Curtis), her daughter Karen (Judy Greer) and granddaughter Allyson (Andi Matichak) left masked monster Michael Myers caged and burning in Laurie’s basement, Laurie is rushed to the hospital with life-threatening injuries, believing she finally killed her lifelong tormentor.

But when Michael manages to free himself from Laurie’s trap, his ritual bloodbath resumes. As Laurie fights her pain and prepares to defend herself against him, she inspires all of Haddonfield to rise up against their unstoppable monster.

The Strode women join a group of other survivors of Michael’s first rampage who decide to take matters into their own hands, forming a vigilante mob that sets out to hunt Michael down, once and for all.

Evil dies tonight.

Universal Pictures, Miramax, Blumhouse Productions and Trancas International Films present Halloween Kills, co-starring Will Patton as Officer Frank Hawkins, Thomas Mann (Kong: Skull Island) and Anthony Michael Hall (The Dark Knight).

From the returning filmmaking team responsible for the 2018 global phenomenon, Halloween Kills is written by Scott Teems (SundanceTV’s Rectify) and Danny McBride and David Gordon Green based on characters created by John Carpenter and Debra Hill. The film is directed by David Gordon Green and produced by Malek Akkad, Jason Blum and Bill Block. The executive producers are John Carpenter, Jamie Lee Curtis, Danny McBride, David Gordon Green and Ryan Freimann.

Summary: After the Vietnam war, a team of scientists explores an uncharted island in the Pacific, venturing into the domain of the mighty Kong, and must fight to escape a primal Eden.

Year: 2017

Australian Cinema Release Date: 10th March 2017

Australian DVD Release Date: 19th July 2017

Country: United States, China

Director: Jordan Vogt-Roberts

Screenwriter: Max Borenstein, Derek Connolly, Dan Gilroy, John Gatins (story), Merian C. Cooper (characters), Edgar Wallace (characters)

Cast: Will Brittain (Young Marlow/Marlow’s Son), James Michael Connor (General Ward (voice), Eugene Cordero (Reles), James Edward Flynn (Sgt. Dren), John Goodman (Bill Randa), Corey Hawkins (Houston Brooks), Tom Hiddleston (James Conrad), Mark Evan Jackson (Landsat Steve), Samuel L. Jackson (Preston Packard), Richard Jenkins (Senator Willis), Tian Jing (San), Rachel Joseph (Iwi), Toby Kebbell (Jack Chapman/Kong), Brie Larson (Mason Weaver), Thomas Mann (Slivko), Thomas Middleditch (Jerry (voice)), Jason Mitchell (Mills), Miyavi (Gunpei Ikari), Terry Notary (Kong), John Oritz (Victor Nieves), Allen Rachel (Secretary O’Brien), John C. Reilly (Hank Marlow), Shea Whigham (Cole)

Runtime: 118 mins

Classification: PG

 

OUR KONG: SKULL ISLAND REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Kyle McGrath’s Kong: Skull Island Review:

The second film in Legendary Pictures “MonsterVerse” Kong: Skull Island is the story of a team of soldiers, scientists and explorers who at the end of the Vietnam war set off to an uncharted island in the Pacific. Almost immediately they encounter the wrath of the mighty King Kong who destroying their military helicopters leave them stranded on Skull Island. The survivors must traverse this unknown land to reach their originally planned evacuation point completely unaware that there are things on this island much worse than a 100 foot tall monkey.
I thoroughly enjoyed 2014’s Godzilla. While I thought the movie had some issues I feel it captured the perfect tone and representation of the titular King of the Monsters. I had heard about Kong: Skull Island from one source that it didn’t take itself too seriously and then from another that it took itself too seriously. After seeing the film I think it’s a mixture of both and it isn’t alway pretty.
From the beginning the filmmakers attempts to make “Apocalypse Now but with monsters” comes off as comedic. The opening scene which itself is set at the height of WW2 as both a US and Japanese soldier crash land on the island and duke it out before being interrupted by Kong feels more like a parody than anything. I was seriously expecting it to turn out to be “golden age of Hollywood” crew making some schlocky movie as a reference to the storylines of other “King Kong” films before being attacked. But no, this is the tone of the movie, rather than awe or drama I’m expecting a punchline and usually getting one from one of the movie’s many comedy relief moments. At a moment of high tension as Kong is about to eat some unfortunate soldier it jump cuts to a man biting into a sandwich. This is comedy stuff and drives a steamroller through any tension the film has built up and turns it into a joke.
The other serious moments, or attempts at serious moments come from the characters mostly, all of whom are non entities. There are simply way too many characters in this movie and not enough plot to go around to flesh them all out in 2 hours. One of the shortcomings of Peter Jackson’s King Kong (2005) was the amount of time early on spent on supporting characters who either weren’t going to make it or weren’t going to be relevant at all by the halfway point.
Their stories felt genuine at least however. Here every other character has some monologue about their past. They talk about writing letters to their mama back home, or their newborn son they’ve never seen or they reminisce about some village they obliterated in ‘nam. All of it feels so melodramatic and ridiculous, again like it came from a parody film such as Black Dynamite and it comes from characters who probably shouldn’t be in the movie at all as their only purpose is to be fodder for some beastie or in some cases not even that. I know it’s complaining about “forced diversity” or “trying to appeal to the Chinese audience” in movies is low hanging fruit but it helps if in a movie your writers give a black guy and a Chinese girl something more substantial to do than just exist, follow the main characters around and talk to each other every now and then to remind us they’re there.
All of this damages the movie. I don’t care about the plot or Samuel L Jackson’s Colonel Kurtz-surrogate insane military commander because so much screen time is dedicated to redundancies. I would say it feels like a movie that has had 30 minutes of story cut out of it if it wasn’t for the low quality of what IS in the movie telling me otherwise.
Now while the actual monster on monster action fares much better and let’s be honest that’s what people came to see even that I found to be harmed by the need at comedy relief. We’re told about “Skull Crawlers”, the REAL threat on the island and what our hero Kong is up against, in a scene which needs to be interrupted for some jokes from long marooned soldier John C. Reilly told in exactly such a fashion that you’d expect from him. The result is on par with a Bond villain slipping on a banana peel in the middle of his master plan speech to James.
That said fans of the genre may get more out of this movie than out of Godzilla 2014. Purely from the fact that while in that film the filmmakers wished to hide the monsters from us as much as possible, here they can’t seem to wait to show it to us.
The film is what it is, a monster themed popcorn movie with cheesy comedy, wafer thin characters and story and 100 foot ape. I do believe that much more could have been done with it however if the filmmakers just knew more what tone they wished to take and story they wanted to tell. The film is tries to mix serious moments with comedy but comes off more like Hot Shots 2 than Mash.

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:  

 

 

IMDB Rating:  Kong: Skull Island (2017) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Kong: Skull Island Reviews: N/A

 

Trailer:

Beautiful Creatures

Summary: A supernatural love story set in the South, Beautiful Creatures tells the tale of two star-crossed lovers: Ethan (Alden Ehrenreich), a young man longing to escape his small town, and Lena (Alice Englert), a mysterious new girl. Together, they uncover dark secrets about their respective families, their history and their town.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 21st February, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Richard LaGravenese

Screenwriter: Richard LaGravenese, Kami Garcia (novel), Margaret Stohl (novel)

Cast: Bryan Adrian (Billy), Eileen Atkins (Gramma), Camille Balsamo (Katherine Duchannes), Tiffany Boone (Savannah Snow), Beau Brasseaux (Caster Shades), Richard Brosnahan (Genevieve Duchannes), Leslie Castay (Principal Herbert), Lindsay Clift (Althea Duchannes), Milton Crosby (Earl), Viola Davis (Amma), Zoey Deutch (Emily Asher), Alden Ehrenreich (Ethan Wate), Alice Englert (Lena Duchannes), J.D. Evermore (Mitchell Wate), Lucy Faust (Juliette Duchannes), Andrea Frankle (Lila Wate), Kyle Gallner (Larkin Ravenwood), Sam Gilroy (Ethan Carter Wate), Cindy Hogan (Mrs. Asher), Jeremy Irons (Macon Ravenwood), Thomas Mann (Link), Margo Martindale (Aunt Del), Treston Miles (Emory), Gwendolyn Mulamba (Mrs. Snow), Lance E. Nichols (Mayor Snow), Philippe Radelet (Suttler), Randy Redd (Revered Stephens), Emmy Rossum (Ridley Duchannes), Robin Skye (Mrs. Hester), Emma Thompson (Mrs. Lincoln/Sarafine), Jackie Tuttle (Isobel Duchannes), Pruitt Taylor Vince (Mr. Lee), Justine Wachsberger (Justine Duchannes), Teri Wyble (Charlotte Duchannes)

Runtime: 124 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Beautiful Creatures’ Review: 

If you’ve seen all the publicity around ‘Beautiful Creatures’ you’ll know that it is supposed to be the replacement film for all of those who have been in mourning since both the ‘Twilight’ and ‘Harry Potter’ franchises have come to a close. The sad fact is however that ‘Beautiful Creatures’ is so bad that it doesn’t deserve to be mentioned in the same breath as the other films.

Based on the semi-successful series of novels by Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl ‘Beautiful Creatures’ follows Ethan Wate (Alden Ehrenreich – ‘Twixt’, ‘Stoker’) a young literature obsessed high school student who since the death of his beloved mother and dreamt of the day that he can escape from Gatlin, South Carolina instead of wasting his days away in a dead-water town with his best friend, Link (Thomas Mann – ‘Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters’, ‘Fun Size’).

Then suddenly Gatlin is made a little bit brighter by the arrival of Lena Duchannes (Alice Englert – ‘In Fear’, ‘Ginger & Rosa’) who is sent to live with her mysterious uncle Macon Ravenwood (Jeremy Irons – ‘Night Train To Lisbon’, ‘The Words’). The religious townsfolk have always been critical of the family for years believing that they practice in witchcraft and they instantly decide that Lena should leave especially after an incident that sees Emily Asher (Zoey Deutsch – TV’S ‘Ringer’, TV’S ‘Switched At Birth’) and Savannah Snow (Tiffany Boone – TV’S ‘Unmatchable’, TV’S ‘Suburgatory’) injured.

When Lena finally allows Ethan close to her he learns that she is a caster (fancy name for witch) but that she is scared that on her sixteenth birthday she may turn dark like the other females in her family, something that family members Sarafine (Emma Thompson – ‘Brave’, ‘Men In Black 3’) and Ridley (Emmy Rossum – TV’S ‘Inside’, TV’S ‘Shameless’) are counting on happening. And while it appears that it is written in stone that doesn’t stop Lena, Ethan, Macon and local ‘seer’ Amma (Viola Davis – ‘Won’t Back Down’, ‘Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close’) from trying to prevent it from happening.

It is surprising just how bad ‘Beautiful Creatures’ really is. It is obvious that Summit Entertainment wanted to re-create the success they gained with ‘Twilight’ and they have obviously directed screenwriter/director Richard LaGravenese (‘P.S. I Love You’, ‘Freedom Writers’) to make this film as similar to their blockbuster as he could. Sadly though this brings the film completely undone, the soundtrack and the leading lady that looks like she could be Kristen Stewart’s sister almost make the film seem like a parody.

Also adding to the parody feeling are some of the cheesy moments during the film that actually have the audience laughing at instead of with the film… actually some of those moments are so bad there may be a few groans as well as laughs. LaGravenese then drags the film down even further when he tries to introduce some ‘Dark Shadows’ style comedy into a film that really should have been a supernatural horror in the vein of ‘The Craft’.

Sadly the producers of ‘Beautiful Creatures’ couldn’t even get the casting right for the film. Emma Thompson and Jeremy Irons pretty much embarrass themselves in roles that could really tarnish their careers while Alden Ehrenreich is far too old to be playing a teenage romantic lead. And as for Alice Englert well she shouldn’t be giving up her TV work anytime soon because her performance here certainly won’t be having Hollywood producers knocking on her door.

No matter how much of a fan of the genre you are ‘Beautiful Creatures’ is the kind of film that you really need to avoid. This is one of 2013’s shockers… Golden Razzie nominations are sure to follow.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Beautiful Creatures′: Check Episode #21 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Beautiful Creatures’. Dave Griffiths also has another review of ‘Beautiful Creatures’ available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Rating: 2/5

IMDB Rating:Beautiful Creatures (2013) on IMDb

Hansel & Gretel Witch Hunters

Summary: After getting a taste for blood as children, Hansel (Jeremy Renner) and Gretel (Gemma Arterton) have become the ultimate vigilantes, hell bent on retribution. Now, unbeknownst to them, Hansel and Gretel have become the hunted, and must face an evil far greater than witches… their past.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 7th February, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA, Germany

Director: Tommy Wirkola

Screenwriter: Tommy Wirkola

Cast: Gemma Arterton (Gretel), Rainer Bock (Mayor Engleman), Alea Sophia Boudodimos (Young Gretel), Robin Atkin Downes (Edward (voice)), Cedric Eich (Young Hansel), Famke Janssen (Muriel), Kathrin Kuhnel (Adrianna), Jeppe Laursen (Tracker William), Thomas Mann (Ben), Derek Mears (Edward), Jeremy Renner (Hansel), Christian Rubeck (Tracker Jonathan), Peter Stormare (Sherriff Berringer), Bjorn Sundquist (Jackson), Phila Viitala (Mina), Lucy Ella von Scheele (Mary Behlmer)

Runtime: 88 mins

Classification:MA15+

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Hansel And Gretel: Witch Hunters’ Review: 

To read Dave’s review of ‘Hansel And Gretel: Witch Hunters’ review please check the Helium Entertainment Channel

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Hansel And Gretel: Witch Hunters′: Check Episode #19 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Hansel And Gretel: Witch Hunters’.

Rating: 2.5/5

IMDB Rating:Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters (2013) on IMDb

Fun Size

Summary: Wren (Victoria Justice) is on the verge of moving into the high school popularity stratosphere when she is asked to go to a Halloween party with the coolest guy in school. The only thing standing in her way is her style-cramping 8 year old brother who may just turn out to be even cooler than her date.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 29th November, 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Josh Schwartz

Screenwriter: Max Werner

Cast: Osric Chau (Peng), Patrick de Ledebur (Mike Puglio), Jeremy Isaiah Earl (Officer Savage), Abby Elliott (Lara), Annie Fitzpatrick (Mrs. Brueder), Ana Gasteyer (Jackie), Stefan Gatt (Hulk), Chelsea Handler (Joy), Victoria Justice (Wren), Kerri Kenney (Barb), Johnny Knoxville (Jorgen), Brandon Landers (Buddy D), Mariana Lessa (Lica), Jane Levy (April), Thomas Mann (Roosevelt), Thomas McDonell (Aaron Riley), Thomas Middleditch (Fuzzy), Jackson Nicoll (Albert), Holmes Osbourne (Mr. Brueder), Josh Pence (Keevin), Maria Perossa (Hailey), James Pumphrey (Brueder), Erin Scerbak (Andrea), Morgane Slemp (Melinda), Rachel Sterling (Kassi), Peter Navy Tuiasosopo (Mr. Mahani), Lori Pelenise Tuisano (Mrs. Mahani), Nicholas Varricchio (Jonathan), Allison Weissman (Mackenzie), Krista Marie Yu (Jordan)

Runtime: 86 mins

Classification:PG

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Fun Size’ Review: 

How do you put this nicely? ‘Fun Size’ is one of the worst films ever made! The film lacks so much direction it’s not even clear where it wanted to end up or even what kind of film it wanted to be. It tries to be ‘Superbad’ or ‘Harold And Kumar Go To White Castle’ but ends up being as wild as an episode of ‘Seventh Heaven’. 

Wren (Victoria Justice) feels she has had a hard life since her father died, she has had to endure her mother, Joy (Chelsea Handler) having to date an immature 26-year-old old guy named Keevin (Josh Pence), and a younger brother Albert (Jackson Nicoll) who does nothing but annoy her with petty things. 

When it comes around to Halloween Wren and her friend April (Jane Levy) are thrilled to get an invite to Aaron Riley’s (Thomas McDonell). But when Wren is left looking after Albert and accidentally loses him the pair are left driving around with ‘geeks’ Roosevelt (Thomas Mann) and Peng (Osric Chau). 

So bad is ‘Fun Size’ that director, Josh Schwartz and screenwriter, Max Werner should be allowed to make another film ever again. The film lacks all forms of humor and while the inclusion of characters such as Fuzzy (Thomas Middleditch) tries to lift the film into Kevin Smith territory it fails on all levels. You can see the moments where the audience is supposed to laugh but instead you can only hear the tumbleweeds blow through the cinema. 

Even worse is the fact that the script loses itself. There is far too much time spent on Joy’s time with Keevin at her party when the main focus needs to be on Wren. Likewise there are huge chunks of the film that doesn’t make any sense. For example, does anyone believe the police would arrest Albert for letting off a firework when Jurgen (Johnny Knoxville) has manhandled him, locked him up and then asked for a ransom? 

And just to make the film even more of a mess it seems the characters of Roosevelt and Peng are like walking clichés from ‘Not Another Teen Movie’. 

Acting-wise, Victoria Justice should just use this as a vehicle to get other work… as long as she’s brave enough to include this dud on her resume, while Thomas Mann announces himself as the new Michael Cera. As for the other actors… well there is nothing there for them to really be proud of. 

Unless you are looking for a way to punish yourself, avoid ‘Fun Size’ at all costs. 

 

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Fun Size′: Check Episode #10 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Fun Size’

Rating: 1/5

IMDB Rating: Fun Size (2012) on IMDb