Tagged: Michelle Williams

 

eOne has just released the trailer for I Feel Pretty. Starring Amy Schumer, I FEEL PRETTY centres on Renee, who struggles with feelings of insecurity and inadequacy on a daily basis. Then one day, she wakes from a fall believing she is suddenly the most beautiful and capable woman on the planet. With this newfound confidence, Renee is empowered to live her life fearlessly and flawlessly. But what will happen when she realises her appearance never changed?

Russell Crowe

At the moment, award season buzz is centering largely around the magnificent performances of Matthew McConaughey and Jared Leto in “Dallas Buyers Club.” The two men’s performances have reminded a lot of film journalists at how well some actors have depicted gay characters on screen over the years, so let’s take a look at some of the actors who played gay characters not only well, but tastefully and with respect.

Russell Crowe: Yes, it may come as a complete surprise to many, but the great Russell Croweonce played a homosexual character on the big screen. It was before Crowe was making Hollywood blockbusters like “Gladiator,” so people can be excused if they haven’t heard of the film, but it was in an Australian film called “The Sum Of Us.” If you haven’t seen it, then you may certainly want to hunt it down and give it a watch because directors Geoff Burton and Kevin Dowling did a pretty decent job. The film itself has Crowe play Jeff Mitchell a young gay man searching for Mr. Right. His search brings him closer to his father, Harry Mitchell (Jack Thompson), who is now in the look for Miss Right. Touching, yet entertaining, the film is just a true romantic drama.

Ian Somerhalder: Long before he was playing vampire Damon Salvatore in “The Vampire Diaries,” Ian Somerhalder appeared in the very underrated flick “The Rules Of Attraction.” The flick was closely linked to “American Psycho,” was directed by Roger Avary and never really received the recognition it deserved as its alternative style of film-making made it an absolute gem. Somerhalder played Paul Denton, a young gay college student, who was disillusioned with the ‘queens’ around him and finds himself falling in love with the troubled and nasty Sean Bateman (James Van Der Beek) who was accidentally breaking hearts right across the campus.

Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal: How could anybody put together a list of actors who have played gay characters without mentioning Jake Gyllenhaal and the late Heath Ledger? When Ang Lee first put together “Brokeback Mountain,” even he admitted he wasn’t sure how the film would be received, after all was there a market for a film about a gay relationship between two cowboys? He need not have worried as the film went on to record 100 award wins worldwide, including three Oscars. It also earned Oscar nominations for Michelle Williams and the two male leads Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal. Ledger and Gyllenhaal put in brilliant performances as they played Jack Twist and Ennis Del Mar, two young cowboys involved in a passionate yet troubled relationship.

Michael Douglas and Matt Damon: When it was first announced that Michael Douglas would be playing Liberace and Matt Damon his boyfriend, Scott Thorson, the film world scoffed. In fact, they more than scoffed because the roles both seemed so out of character for both actors that many thought the film would just not work and it was pretty much decided that “Behind The Candelabra” was going to become a car-wreck of a film. People should never have doubted the creative mind of director Steven Soderbergh because he brought out the best in both actors, so much so that film critic Adam Ross was quoted on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show as saying “Douglas was so far into character it looked like he wanted to jump Damon between takes.” So good were Douglas and Damon’s performances that both have had their names mentioned during awards season.

Sean Penn: Another actor who ended up becoming an award winner while playing a gay character was Sean Penn. Penn picked up the Best Actor Academy Award in 2009 when he appeared in Gus Van Sant’s film “Milk” in the title role – playing gay activist Harvey Milk. His fellow co-star Josh Brolin also picked up the Best Supporting Actor Academy Award for playing Dan White in the film that had critics ecstatic upon its release.

Tom Hanks: The great Tom Hanks also picked up an Oscar for playing a gay character when back in 1993. He played Andrew Beckett, a lawyer suffering from AIDS in the “Philadelphia.” The film not only educated the world on how hard it is for somebody infected with AIDS, but also dealt a valuable lesson about homophobia as Beckett is forced to work with a homophobic lawyer named Joe Miller (Denzel Washington). The film may be over 20 years now, but if you have never seen “Philadelphia” then it is certainly worth taking a look at.

With so many actors winning awards over the years for playing gay characters then it may seem like Mr. McConaughey and Mr. Leto might be in a good position as we all head into Awards season.

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show

Recently the hosts of ‘The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show’ came up with their favourite actors here’s who is made their lists.

 

GREG KING’S LIST

Jodie Foster

  • Matt Damon
  • Michael Caine
  • Charles Bronson
  • John Wayne
  • Leonardo DiCaprio
  • Denzel Washington
  • Jack Nicholson
  • Michael Douglas
  • Sean Connery
  • Harrison Ford
  • Tom Cruise
  • Arnold Schwarzenegger
  • Robert De Niro
  • Tom Hanks
  • Jodie Foster

 

ADAM ROSS’ LIST

Russell Crowe

  • Tom Cruise
  • Mickey Rourke
  • Liam Neeson
  • Edward Norton
  • Christian Bale
  • Jack Nicholson
  • Naomi Watts
  • Jean-Claude Van Damme
  • Al Pacino
  • Dustin Hoffman
  • Arnold Schwarznegger
  • Russell Crowe

 

DAVID GRIFFITHS’ LIST

Leonardo DiCaprio

  • Russell Crowe
  • Bruce Willis
  • Woody Harrelson
  • Nicolas Cage
  • Emma Watson
  • Steve Carell
  • Michael Cera
  • Jesse Eisenberg
  • Kirsten Dunst
  • Emma Stone
  • Ryan Gosling
  • Tom Cruise
  • Brit Marling
  • Ben Affleck
  • Matt Damon
  • Michelle Williams
  • Christian Bale
  • Heath Ledger
  • Stanley Tucci
  • Matthew McConaughey
  • Leonardo DiCaprio

 

NICK GARDENER’S LIST

Humphrey Bogart

  • Will Ferrell
  • Larry David
  • John Cleese
  • Kirsten Dunst
  • Leonardo DiCaprio
  • Bruno Ganz
  • Edward G. Robinson
  • John Hurt
  • Viggo Mortensen
  • Chips Rafferty
  • Anthony Hopkins
  • Sean Connery
  • James Gandolfini
  • Sidney Poitiner
  • Robert Duvall
  • Michael Caine
  • Patrick Stewart
  • Michael Fassbender
  • Samuel L. Jackson
  • John Meillion
  • Meryl Streep
  • Harvey Keitel
  • Morgan Freeman
  • Robert De Niro
  • Humphrey Bogart

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show

In Episode #46 of ‘The Good The Bad Ugly Film Show’ the boys took a look at who they thought were the best ever child actors, let’s have a look at their selections.

GREG KING’S LIST

Jonathan Taylor Thomas

  • Elizabeth Taylor
  • Mickey Rooney
  • Judy Garland
  • Kurt Russell
  • Jodie Foster
  • Brooke Shields
  • Anna Paquin
  • Macaulay Culkin
  • Frankie Muniz
  • Dakota Fanning
  • Chloe Grace Moretz
  • Roddy McDowall
  • Brady Bunch Cast (Eve Plumb)
  • Christina Ricci
  • Natalie Portman
  • Haley Joel Osment
  • Ron Howard
  • Tatum O’Neil
  • Nicholas Hoult
  • Christian Bale
  • Drew Barrymore
  • Ben Oxenbould
  • Joseph Gordon-Levitt
  • Jonathan Taylor Thomas
  • The Olson Twins
  • Devon Sawa
  • Kodi Smit-McPhee
  • Angourie Rice
  • Garry Pankhurst
  • Henry Thomas
  • Jake Lloyd
  • Freddie Highmore
  • Leonardo DiCpario

 

ADAM ROSS’ LIST

Photographed by John Tass-Parker

  • Natalie Portman
  • Jodie Foster
  • Haley Joel Osment
  • Kirsten Dunst
  • Linda Blair
  • Kodi Smit-McPhee
  • Josh Peck
  • Rufus Read
  • Jacob Kogan
  • Isabelle Fuhrman
  • Eloise Laurence
  • Pierce Gagnon
  • Asa Butterfield

 

DAVID GRIFFITHS’ LIST

Hanna Mangan lawrence

  • Kirsten Dunst
  • Drew Barrymore
  • Sebastian Gregory
  • Hannah Mangan-Lawrence
  • Bailee Madison
  • Joseph Gordon-Levitt
  • Mila Kunis
  • Christian Bale
  • Abigail Breslin
  • Rachel Miner
  • Bijou Phillips
  • Kristen Stewart
  • Joshua Jackson
  • Daniel Radcliffe
  • Rupert Grint
  • Emma Watson
  • Tom Felton
  • Tom Holland
  • Tom Russell
  • Kodi Smit-McPhee
  • James McKenna
  • Michelle Williams
  • Robert Capron
  • Matthew Krok
  • Leonardo DiCaprio
  • WORST LIST – Macaulay Culkin
  • WORST LIST – Jaden Smith

 

NICK GARDENER’S LIST

Michelle Williams

  • Different Strokes Cast
  • Macuarly Culkin
  • Kirsten Dunst
  • Jonathan Lipnicki
  • Michelle Williams
  • Justin Timberlake
  • Danica McKellar
  • Jack Wilde
  • David Faustino
  • Christina Ricci
  • Henry Stevens
  • Jaleel White

 

The Good The Bad The UglyIn Episode 38 of The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Dave, Nick and Greg took at look at what they feel are the best acting performances in films made after the year 2000.

NICK GARDENER’S LIST

Joaquin Phoenix

Viggo Mortensen – ‘A Dangerous Method

Christoph Waltz – ‘Inglorious Basterds

Kirsten Dunst – ‘Melancholia

Charlotte Gainsbourg – ‘Melancholia’

Russell Crowe – ‘A Beautiful Mind’

Tom Hardy – ‘Bronson’

Javier Bardem – ‘No Country For Old Men’

Will Ferrell – ‘Zoolander’

George Clooney – ‘The American’

Robert Downey Jnr – ‘Iron Man’

Daniel Day Lewis – ‘There Will Be Blood’, ‘Lincoln’

Paul Giamatti – ‘Sideways’

Anna Paquin – ‘Margaret’

Michael Fassbender – ‘Shame’, ‘X-Men: First Class’

Heath Ledger – ‘The Dark Knight’

Naomi Watts – ‘Mullholland Drive’

Joaquin Phoenix – ‘The Master’

 

GREG KING’S LIST

Heath Ledger

Matthew McConaughey – ‘Mud’

Heath Ledger – ‘The Dark Knight’

Anne Hathaway – “Les Miserables’

Sean Penn – ‘Mystic River’

Daniel Day Lewis – ‘Lincoln’

Christoph Waltz – ‘Inglorious Basterds’, ‘Django Unchained’

Carey Mulligan – ‘Shame’

Joseph Gordon-Levitt – ‘Mysterious Skin’, ’50/50′

Ryan Gosling – ‘Blue Valentine’, ‘The Place Beyond The Pines’, ‘Drive’

Matt Damon – ‘The Bourne Franchise’, ‘Promised Land’

 

DAVID GRIFFITHS’ LIST

Leonardo DiCaprio

Joaquin Phoenix – ‘The Master’

Michael Shannon – ‘Take Shelter’

Heath Ledger – ‘The Dark Knight’

Anne Hathaway – ‘Rachel Getting Married’

Mickey Rourke – ‘The Wrestler’

Forrest Whitaker – ‘The Last King Of Scotland’

Alan Rickman – ‘Harry Potter Franchise’

Emma Stone – ‘Easy A’

Noomi Rapace – ‘The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo’

Joseph Gordon-Levitt – ‘Mysterious Skin’, ‘Brick’

Hugo Weaving – ‘Last Ride’

Ellen Page – ‘Juno’

Christoph Waltz – ‘Django Unchained’

Leonardo DiCaprio – ‘Shutter Island’, ‘Django Unchained’, ‘The Departed’

Michelle Williams – ‘Wendy & Lucy’, ‘Blue Valentine’

Kate Winslet – ‘Little Children’, ‘The Reader’

Penelope Cruz – ‘Vicky Cristina Barcelona’

Sam Rockwell – ‘Moon’

Jessie Eisenberg – ‘The Social Network’

Justin Timberlake – ‘The Social Network’

Nicolas Cage – ‘Lord Of War’

George Clooney – ‘The Descendants’

Michael Fassbender – ‘Shame’

Jennifer Lawrence – ‘Winter’s Bone’

Matthew McConaughey – ‘Mud’

Ryan Gosling – ‘Drive’

Robert Pattinson – ‘Remember Me’

Tom Holland – ‘The Impossible’

Naomi Watts – ‘The Impossible’

The Good The Bad The Ugly

This week Dave, Nick, Adam and Greg take a look at new release films Barbara, 21 & Over, Blinder, Great Expectations, Broken City and Oz: The Great And Powerful. This episode also features interviews with James Franco, Zach Braff, Mila Kunis, Rachel Weisz, Sam Raimi, Michelle Williams, Gary Jones, Howard Berger, Vivian Baker, Catherine Zeta-Jones and Mark Wahlberg

Also make sure you listen for your chance to win a copy of ‘Storm Surfers 3D’ on Blu-Ray thanks to Madman Entertainment.

Oz The Great And Powerful

Summary: Disney’s fantastical adventure Oz: The Great and Powerful, directed by Sam Raimi, imagines the origins of L. Frank Baum’s beloved character, the Wizard of Oz. When Oscar Diggs (James Franco), a small-time circus magician with dubious ethics, is hurled away from dusty Kansas to the vibrant Land of Oz, he thinks he’s hit the jackpot – fame and fortune are his for the taking – that is until he meets three witches, Theodora (Mila Kunis), Evanora (Rachel Weisz) and Glinda (Michelle Williams), who are not convinced he is the great wizard everyone’s been expecting.

Reluctantly drawn into the epic problems facing the Land of Oz and its inhabitants, Oscar must find out who is good and who is evil before it is too late. Putting his magical arts to use through illusion, ingenuity – and even a bit of wizardry – Oscar transforms himself not only into the great and powerful Wizard of Oz but into a better man as well.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 7th March, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Sam Raimi

Screenwriter: Mitchell Kapner, David Lindsay-Abaire, L. Frank Baum (novel)

Cast: Russell Bobbitt (Mr. Baum), Zach Braff (Frank/Finley), Bill Cobbs (Master Tinker), Tony Cox (Knuck), James Franco (Oscar Diggs), Joey King (Girl In Wheelchair/China Girl), Mila Kunis (Theodora/The Wicked Witch Of The West), Abigail Spencer (May), Rachel Weisz (Evanora), Michelle Williams (Annie/Glinda)

Runtime: 130 mins

Classification:PG

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Oz The Great And Powerful’ Review: 

You have to hand it to Sam Raimi (‘Drag Me To Hell’, ‘Spider-Man 3’), he is a bit of a glutton for punishment. His work on the ‘Spider-Man’ franchise seemed to divide fans of the webbed crusader and now he almost commits cinematic sacrilege by taking on the challenge of producing a prequel to one of the most loved films of all time ‘The Sound Of Music’.

Luckily for Raimi he is up to the task and despite the fact the film has a massive lull in the middle scenes it does enough to entertain the audience and keeps the fabulous world of Oz well and truly alive.

The film begins with Oscar Diggs (James Franco – ‘Lovelace’, ‘Interior Leather Bar’) as a womanizing poor impersonation of a magician who is so wrapped up in his own lifestyle that he can’t even commit to the love of his life Annie (Michelle Williams – ‘My Week With Marilyn’, ‘Take This Waltz’) even if that means seeing her walk down the aisle with another man.

When a freak accident involving a hot air balloon and a tornado occurs Oscar suddenly finds himself in a strange new land where he meets witch sisters Theodora (Mila Kunis – ‘Tar’, ‘Ted’) and Evanora (Rachel Weisz – ‘The Bourne Legacy’, ‘Dream House’) and despite his promises he can’t help but continue on his womanizing ways.

Declaring him as the Wizard and their savoir, the two witches send Oscar along with his winged-monkey sidekick Finley (Zach Braff – ‘Tar’, TV’S ‘The Exes’) to destroy the supposed wicked witch Glinda (Michelle Williams). Along the way he meets a young broken China Girl (Joey King – ‘Family Weekend’, ‘The Dark Knight Rises’) whom he helps, however when he arrives at his destination he begins flirting with Glinda which causes all hell to break out with Theodora and Evanora meaning that nobodies lives are safe.

‘Oz The Great And Powerful’ is one film that you just have to see in 3D. Raimi has made the Oz universe look like something from ‘Avatar’ while the producers have also used a lot of the same ideas that they used in Tim Burton’s ‘Alive In Wonderland’. There are also clear references to ‘Pinnochio’ and of course ‘Wicked’ but Raimi brings them all together and produces a film that seems to mix the right amount of comedy, drama and even some action… just be warned that some of the supernatural scenes may scare younger audience members.

And while the film is a great watch it really lets down its leading man, James Franco. Oscar is this interesting  character but for some reason the screenplay just seems to have grinning wildly for most of the time. Luckily Michelle Williams, Rachel Weisz and Mila Kunis put in brilliant performances and are like leading ladies of old.

‘Oz The Great And Wonderful’ is an enjoyable watch and Sam Raimi shows that he is the visionary director that his early career suggested.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Oz The Great And Powerful′: Check Episode #23 (available 8th March) of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Oz The Great And Powerful’. Dave also has a review of ‘Oz The Great And Powerful’ that is available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Rating: 4/5

IMDB Rating: Oz the Great and Powerful (2013) on IMDb

Meek's Cutoff

Summary: The year is 1845 and a wagon team of three families is setting off across the sparse terrain of the Oregon desert, in northwest USA. They are guided by mountain man Stephen Meek, who claims to know a short cut, but when they become lost in the dry rock and sage, their faith in their guide, and in each other, weakens. After days of wandering, suffering the hardships of the inhospitable landscape and unable to find water, a Native American wanderer crosses their path. The pioneers are torn between trusting their guide or a man who has always been seen as the enemy.

Year: 2010

Australian Cinema Release Date: 5th June, 2011

Australian DVD Release Date: 5th October, 2011

Country: USA

Director: Kelly Reichardt

Screenwriter: Jonathan Raymond

Cast: Paul Dano (Thomas Gately), Bruce Greenwood (Stephen Meek), Shirley Henderson (Glory White), Neal Huff (William White), Zoe Kazan (Millie Gately), Tommy Nelson (Jimmy White), Will Patton (Soloman Tetherow), Rod Rondeaux (The Indian), Michelle Williams (Emily Tetherow)

Runtime: 104 mins

Classification:PG

OUR REVIEWS/RATINGS OF ‘MEEK’S CUTOFF’:

David Griffiths: Stars(4)

Kelly Reichardt seems to have done something over the years that has upset those responsible for making sure she wins an Oscar because while it was disappointing that Wendy & Lucy didn’t get nominated it is an absolute crime that Meek’s Cutoff wasn’t. While this isn’t a film for the popcorn set it is a film that will be lapped up by real film lovers. It is a film that will actually make you think… now you can’t say that about much modern cinema, can you?

Meek’s Cutoff follows a group of settlers as they make their way across the harsh Oregon landscape in 1845. The group which is made up of Soloman Tetherow (Will Patton), his wife, Emily (Michelle Williams) as well as the Gately Family and the White Family is being led by Stephen Meek (Bruce Greenwood) who is supposed to be a great tracker, but seems to have got the group lost. As the continue to wander aimlessly through the un-inhabitated land the realisation that they could die of starvation or thirst becomes reality, while Meek continues to warn them that the only thing they have to fear is the savage Indian tribes that are ‘watching them’. The racist Meek then takes an Indian (Rod Rondeaux) captive which divides the group.

Those familiar with Reichardt’s style will know that she likes to use minimal dialogue in her films. She once again uses this in Meek’s Cutoff and it enhances the film a million times over. It truly gives the audience a real feel of the loneliness that the characters are going through, and while some audience members will be annoyed by her ‘slow-moving’ style scenes such as the opening scene can really only be described as pieces of cinematic brilliance that true film lovers will fall in love with instantly. It is work like this that show just how good of a director Kelly Reichardt really is.

Meek’s Cutoff is penned by Jonathan Raymond (the same screenwriter who wrote Reichardt’s brilliant Wendy And Lucy) and this is one combination that seems to be a marriage in heaven. Raymond’s fine script only enhances Reichardt’s film-making style even more and if it is true that Raymond used the politics of George Bush vs. Barack Obama as a basis for the storyline of this script then he really is a screenwriting genius… and if he didn’t well he should just shut-up and let people think that he did.

This film also once again reminds the world just good Michelle Williams is as an actress. Once again she puts in a faultless performance and it seems that since her Dawson’s Creek days she has continued to grow as an actress and never once put in a bad performance. Those critical of her acting should see her ‘stand-offs’ with Bruce Greenwood in Meek’s Cutoff because they are truly sensational.

Meek’s Cutoff shows that are still some creative films that can surface from the U.S. and only proves the fact that Kelly Reichardt is one of the most important filmmakers of our generation.

Greg King: Stars(2.5)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘Meek’s Cutoff’ that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Meek’s Cutoff′: This review of ‘Meek’s Cutoff’ by David Griffiths originally appeared in Buzz Magazine.

If you’re a fan of director, Kelly Reichardt (Wendy & Lucy, Old Joy) then you are sure to love her new offering Meek’s Cutoff. But like her past work it is hard to see Meek’s Cutoff being lapped up by the popcorn set, instead this is a movie for the film-connoisseur, and one that will be well-loved by those who consider themselves at Reichardt fan.

Meek’s Cutoff is set in Oregon in 1845 as a group of settlers make their away across the country in order to stake a ‘claim’. The group which is made up of Soloman Tetherow (Will Patton – Knucklehead, Waking Madison), his wife, Emily (Michelle Williams – Shutter Island, Blue Valentine) as well as the Gately Family and the White Family is being led by Stephen Meek (Bruce Greenwood – Super 8, TV’S Young Justice) who is supposed to be a great tracker, but seems to have got the group lost. The racist Meek then takes an Indian (Rod Rondeaux – TV’S Comanche Moon & Into The West) captive which divides the group.

Reichardt once again uses her familiar style of ‘very little dialogue but brilliant cinematography’ to get the very important message held in Meek’s Cutoff across to her audience, and this is one film that is really enhanced by her ‘slow-moving’ style. The opening scenes of a wagon crossing a river a brilliant, and only goes to show just how good Reichardt is as a director.

Reichardt’s skills are only enhanced by a terrific script by Jonathan Raymond (Wendy & Lucy, TV’S Mildred Pierce). If the rumours that Raymond uses a metaphor of George Bush vs. Barack Obama are true then he is a screenwriting genius… if they aren’t true then he can simply rest on the laurels of the fact that he has created an amazing film that once again gives actress, Michelle Williams a chance to show off her brilliant skills. Any of the scenes that she does here with Bruce Greenwood are truly sensational.

Meek’s Cutoff shows that are still some creative films that can surface from the U.S. and only proves the fact that Kelly Reichardt is one of the most important filmmakers of our generation.

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3)

IMDB Rating: Meek's Cutoff (2010) on IMDb

Trailer: