Tagged: Tom Courtenay

Night Train To Lisbon

Summary: Raimund Gregorius is a Latin teacher from Berne. Encountering a book by the Portuguese poet and doctor Amadeu de Prado, he takes a train to Lisbon determined to find out more about the writer who appears to ask the very same questions that plague him: the purpose of human deeds and the unrealised potential of each and every life. His restless quest across Lisbon uncovers a contradictory portrait of a clever and brave yet conflicted man who lived at the time of Salazar’s dictatorship.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 5th December, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Germany, Switzerland, Portugal

Director: Bille August

Screenwriter: Greg Latter, Ulrich Hermann, Pascal Mercier (novel)

Cast: Helena Afonso (Maria Prado), Beatriz Batarda (Young Adriana), Nicolau Breyner (Da Silva), Sarah Buhlmann (Catarina Mendes), Tom Courtenay (Joao Eca), Marco D’Almeida (Young Joao), Dominique Devenport (Natalie), August Diehl (Young Jorge O’Kelly), Bruno Ganz (Jorge O’Kelly), Martina Gedeck (Mariana), Bomber Hurley-Smith (Young Bartolomeu), Jack Huston (Amadeu), Jeremy Irons (Raimund Gregorius), Burghart Klaubner (Judge Prado), Melanie Laurent (Young Estefania), Christopher Lee (Father Bartolomeu), Adriano Luz (Mendes), Hanspeter Muller (Mr. Kagi), Lena Olin (Estefania), Ana Lucia Palminha (Young Clotilde), Charlotte Rampling (Adriana de Prado), Jane Thorne (Coltilde), Filipe Vargas (Young Father Bartolomeu)

Runtime: 111 mins

Classification:M

OUR NIGHT TRAIN TO LISBON REVIEWS & RATINGS

Greg King: Stars(2.5)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘Cloudy With A Chance Of Meatballs 2’ that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(2.5)

IMDB Rating:  Night Train to Lisbon (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Night Train To Lisbon′: Please check our Night Train To Lisbon review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep 61.

Trailer:

Gambit

Summary: An art curator decides to seek revenge on his abusive boss by conning him into buying a fake Monet, but his plan requires the help of an eccentric and unpredictable Texas rodeo queen.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 15th August, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Michael Hoffman

Screenwriter: Ethan Coen, Joel Coen

Cast: Obi Abrili (Executive Slazenger), Selina Cadell (Dowager), Tom Courtenay (The Major), Spencer Cummins (Sgt. Puznowski), David Dansen (Monet), Cameron Diaz (PJ Puznowski), Colin Firth (Harry Deane), Masashi Fujimoto (Big Man Chon), Sarah Goldberg (Executive Wilson), Ross Gurney-Randall (Goring), Gerald Horan (Mr. Knowles), Togo Igawa (Takagawa), Cloris Leachman (Grandma Merle), Alex MacQueen (Mr. Dunlop), Mike Noble (Crouch The Gunboy), Julian Rhind-Tutt (Xander), Alan Rickman (Lionel Shahbandar), Anna Skellern (Secretary Fiona), Stanley Tucci (Martin Zaidenweber), Sadao Ueda (Chuck)

Runtime: 89 mins

Classification:CTC

SUBCULTURE MEDIA/THE GOOD THE BAD THE UGLY FILM SHOW REVIEWS/RATINGS OF ‘GAMBIT’:

Greg King: Stars(2.5)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘Gambit’ that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(2.5)

IMDB Rating:  Gambit (2012) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Gambit′: Please check Episode #45 of The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show for more reviews of ‘Gambit’.

Trailer:

Quartet

Summary: Cecily (Pauline Collins), Reggie (Tom Courtenay) and Wilfred (Billy Connolly) are in a home for retired opera singers. Every year, on October 10, there is a concert to celebrate Verdi’s birthday and they take part. Jean (Maggie Smith), who used to be married to Reggie, arrives at the home and disrupts their equilibrium. She still acts like a diva, but she refuses to sing. Still, the show must go on… and it does.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 26th December, 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: UK

Director: Dustin Hoffman

Screenwriter: Ronald Harwood

Cast: Shola Adewusi (Sheryl), Colin Bradbury (Olly Fisher) Virginia Bradbury (Daisy), Michael Byrne (Frank White), Pauline Collins (Cissy Robson), Billy Connolly (Wilf Bond), Tom Courtenay (Reginald Paget), Sarah Crowden (Felicity Liddle), Alexander Duczmal (Marta), Ania Duczmal (Eva), Ronnie Fox (Nobby), Michael Gambon (Cedric Livingston),John Georgeiadis (Bill),  John Heley (Leo Cassell), Ita Herbert (Regina), Jack Honeyborne (Dave Trubeck), Ronnie Hughes (Tony Rose), Jumayn Hunter (Joey), Dame Gwyneth Jones (Anne Langley), Denis Khoroshko (Tadek), Patricia Loveland (Letitia Davis), Iona Mathieson (Young Violinist Iona), Isla Mathieson (Young Violinist Isla), Cynthia Morey (Lottie Yates), Luke Newberry (Simon), Kent Olesen (Lars), Trevor Peacock (George), Eline Powell (Angelique), John Rawnsley (Nigel), David Ryall (Harry), Andrew Sachs (Bobby Swanson), Graeme Scott (Fred), Maggie Smith (Jean Horton), Sheridan Smith (Dr. Lucy Cogan), Patricia Varley (Octavia), Melonie Waddingham (Marion Reed), Nuala Willis (Norma McIntyre)

Runtime: 98 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Quartet’ Review: 

‘Quartet’ is unashamedly aimed at an older audience, but that certainly shouldn’t put you off if you’re of the younger generation and enjoy a good film. Because age demographic aside ‘Quartet’ is an enjoyable film that is likely to provide a chuckle or two along the way.

Directed by legendary actor, Dustin Hoffman (who hasn’t directed a film since 1978’s Straight Time) Quartet’ finds three members of England’s once-most talented opera quartet living together in a retirement home for retired musicians under the charge of young doctor, Dr. Lucy Cogan (Sheridan Smith – Mr. Stink, TV’S Jonathan Creek).

The first member of the group is Reginald (Tom Courtenay – Gambit, The End Of An Era) who seems  so active and ‘with-it’ it would appear he has gone into the home too early. He is still extremely active and keeps his mind going by passing on his musical knowledge to young students. When asked why he went into the home he always says he is in there to be with his best friend, Wilf (Billy Connolly – Brave, TV’S House) who has lost the ability to censor himself after a stroke affected his brain. Rounding out the group is Cissy (Pauline Collins – Albert Nobbs, TV’S Mount Pleasant) who knows suffers from such severe dementia that she constantly needs to be reminded what she should be doing.

The trio’s world is turned upside down though when the new resident who moves in just happens to be Jean (Maggie Smith – The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, TV’S Downtown Abby) – the missing member of their quartet. While Cissy and Wilf thinks it would be great to get Jean to rejoin their quartet so they can perform in a gala night being put together by the extremely bossy Cedric (Michael Gambon – Restless, TV’S Luck). It seems like a good idea however Jean seems like she is reluctant to ever perform again while poor Reginald is at a loss at what to do as Jean once broke his heart.

Hoffman brings together a wonderfully brilliant film that certainly captivates it’s audience, but that doesn’t mean that he hasn’t made a couple of mistakes along the well. On the surface the idea of having the central characters played by actors and the other residents in the home being played by some of the Europe’s finest opera performers and musicians seems like a great idea, however during the film the ‘others’ seem to get dangerously out-acted by what can only be described as an A-List of some of the United Kingdom’s finest actors.

No matter your age you will find yourself drawn to the characters of ‘Quartet’. It’s a heartfelt story and let’s be honest you don’t have to be in this film’s demographic to know what heart ache or the lack of self-worth feels like. Don’t take any notice of the advertising this really is a film that can be enjoyed by all age groups.

Of course as you would expect one of the standouts about ‘Quartet’ are the acting performances. As usual Maggie Smith is brilliant while Pauline Collins also does a fabulous job. But even they seem to be outdone by Michael Gambon who seems to embrace a slight comedic part while Billy Connolly leaves everybody in his wake and he gathers up laughs left, right and centre.

‘Quartet’ is a great little film that reminds us all that you don’t need a big budget, just a great script, to work as a cinema piece.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Quartet′: Check Episode #13 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Quartet’. Dave’s other review of ‘Quartet’ can be found on the Helium Entertainment Channel

Rating: 3.5/5

IMDB Rating: Quartet (2012) on IMDb