Tagged: Benedict Wall

Summary: A female pilot is met with hostility when she joins an all male crew during World War II. However the issues between them soon pale into insignificance when they discover they have a ‘monster’ on board.

Year: 2020

Cinema Release Dates: 14th January 2021 (Australia)

VOD Release Dates: 1st January 2021 (USA)

Country: New Zealand, USA

Director: Roseanne Liang

Screenwriter: Max Landis, Roseanne Liang

Cast: Byron Coll (Terrence Taggart), Beulah Koale (Anton Williams), Chloe Grace Moretz (Maude Garrett), Callan Mulvey (John Reeves), Nick Robinson (Stu Beckell), Taylor John Smith (Walter Quaid), Benedict Wall (Tommy Dorn), John Witowski (Bradley Finch)

Running Time: 83 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia), R (USA)

OUR SHADOW IN THE CLOUD REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Shadow In The Cloud Review:

Shadow In The Cloud is the kind of film that doesn’t know what it wants to be when it grows up… and I think I like it that way. As a film it is as much a monster horror as it is a war film and it is just as much sci-fi/fantasy as it is a thriller… yes, it is a very hard film to try and pigeon-hole. That all gets even trickier when I point out that three-quarters of the action of the film takes place in a small section of a place that barely gives leads actress Chloe Grace-Moretz (Kick-Ass) room to physically move.

Moretz plays Maude Garrett a young woman who boards an Air Force plane in New Zealand right at the height of World War II. The all male crew which include John Reeves (Callan Mulvey – Captain America: The Winter Soldier) and Anton Williams (Beulah Koale – The Last Saint) are suddenly put out by having a ‘dame’ on their plane. Most make disgusting and degrading comments about what they would like to do to the ‘bird’ with very few making any effort to protect her. The general consensus is that they certainly don’t want a woman on their plane when they are already running such a mundane mission.

Maude’s only saving grace is the mystery surrounding the highly secretive package that she is carrying and the fact that she carries orders from a high ranking officer that the others fear. With very little space on board the flight though they stow Maude away from the rest of the crew and it is only then that secrets start to be revealed as she is one of the first to spot the ‘gremlin’ that is ripping apart the plane and the fact that they are being shadowed by enemy planes.

I am still a little confused at what director Roseanne Liang (My Wedding And Other Secrets) was trying to create with this film? Was she trying to turn Chloe Grace Moretz into an action hero like we recently saw with Milla Jovovich in Monster Hunter or was she trying for something a little more. Certainly there is something that I liked about this film despite some of its weaknesses. I loved the twists and turns that the plot took as secrets started to be revealed – yes they are kind of hard to believe but at the same time I was watching a movie where a winged creature was attacking a plane as well.

What I do know is that the action worked and we saw a new string in the bow of the acting talents of Moretz. At times here she is asked to put in a theatre like performance in a tight space while also playing an action lead – a weird mix that I dare say would not be able to be pulled off by many performers out there. The creature looks amazing, no surprise there seeing it was created by Weta Workshop, but the film is sometimes let down by its cheesy soundtrack and at times dodgy looking CGI which I guess I was supposed to over-look as part of the film’s steam-punk vibe.

Liang also successfully makes her point about sexism in the workplace. What the all male crew (who for a majority of the film are reduced to voices over a radio) say about Maude is disgusting and I am pretty sure it would have even the most hardened chauvinist seeing the errors of his ways. She also reveals aside of history that a lot like to ignore – the role of women during the World Wars… no they were not all at home darning socks.

At the end of the day Shadow In The Cloud does work. The action sequences on board the plane suggest that Liang is a director that we need to be watching in the future while the final battle sequence may have been simple but it is exactly what I felt was needed to finish off the film.

This film once again reminded me of the acting force that is Chloe Grace Moretz and has made me place Roseanne Liang on my list of directors to watch in the future. Shadow In The Cloud might be a mixing of genres but it is certainly worth the admission fee at the box office.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Average Subculture Rating:

IMDB Rating:

Shadow in the Cloud (2020) on IMDb

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Trailer:

Summary: During World War II a young Aboriginal woman sees the injustice that she and her community endures under white settlement and decides to get revenge.

Year: 2020

Cinema Release Dates: 21st January 2021 (Australia),

VOD Release Dates: 6th January 2021 (Australia)

Country: Australia

Director: Victoria Whafre McIntyre

Screenwriter: Victoria Wharfe McIntyre

Cast: Brendan Bacon (Tick), Eddie Baroo (Bushy), Suzannah Bayes-Morton (Marlee), Lance Brown (Doug Bradfield), Vida Elaine Brown (River Brown), Sarah Butler (Sister Marie), Shaka Cook (Waru Banganha), Angus Rose Dann (Alinta), Joy Jasmin Dann (Lowanna), Kenneth Paul Dann (Nudgee), Priscilla Vida Isabelle Dann (Darri), Summer Sky Dann (Molly), Lucas Dillon (Young Kelly), Anni Finsterer (Wilma Wilson), Rob Flanagan (Terry), Karen Garnsey (Pam Bradfield), Barnaby Hanning (Young Shamus), Rupert Hanning (Young Paddy), Maci Grace Johnson (Wanna), Aaron Jeffrey (William ‘Minto’ Minton), Dean Krywood (Shamus/Paddy Mackay), Simone Landers (Binda Banganha), Alexis Lane (Jarah Banganha), Keith Learn (Sorley Mackay), Peter McAllum (Gerald Mackay), Joseph James Brown McLeod (Gari), Justine Angus May Brown McLeod (Alkina), Paul James McLeod (Uncle Jack), Michael McStay (Constable Neale), Jillian O’Dowd (Constable Brady), Socrates Otto (Miller), Daniel Potts (Detective MacGregor), Soraya Rennie (Billie), Toby James Sakeld (Jackson), Petra Salsjo (Majorie), Tykia Simpson (Young Jarah), Tyson Towney (Knorre), William Usic (Jim Wilson), Bendedict Wall (Kelly Mackay), Dalara Williams (Maggie Banganha), Sarah Woods (Meg)

Running Time: 117 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia)

OUR WORDS THE FLOOD REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ The Flood Review:

I often laugh as a film critic when I see somebody try to compare one film to another when really the films actually don’t share that much in common. That is certainly the case with the brand new Australian film The Flood. As soon as the trailer landed people were comparing it to The Nightingale.

Now I will admit that The Flood does share some similar themes – revenge and retribution (but so does a million other films out there on the market) and it does explore indigenous culture, although to say that it explores the same aspects of indigenous culture as The Nightingale I would have to say is incredibly narrow minded.

Directed by Victoria Wharfe McIntyre (Miro) The Flood explores several themes that I have found to have been sadly not explored on the Australian cinematic landscape. Topics such as indigenous Australians fighting for Australia in war and the brutal rapes that many First Nation’s women had to endure at the hands of the white settlers.

The film centres around Jarah Banganha (Alexis Lane – Cleverman) who during the time of World War II watches as her family is ripped apart by the new ‘laws’ introduced by white settlers including the cruel Gerald Mackay (Peter McAllum – The War At Home) and his son (Dean Kyrwood – Water Horse). While Jarah experiences the first hand cruelty delivered by the settlers her anger is further fuelled when her husband Waru (Shaka Cook – Top End Wedding) returns from war is not treated the same way as his best friend, Minto (Aaron Jeffrey – X-Men Origins: Wolverine).

There is often a harsh diversity to The Flood. The visuals of the Australian bush from cinematographer Kevin Scott (Backburning) are truly spectacular and beautiful but at the same time the events happening in and around them are of sheer brutality. Having said that though the brutal nature of the film is in context and possibly the only way to describe what Victoria Wharfe McIntyre does with the film as similar to the style of Quentin Tarantino with Django Unchained or Inglorious Basterds.

While important themes and often forgotten parts of Australian history are explored during The Flood it is important to remember that at the heart of this film is a genre flick. Dig deep under the storyline of the film is a harsh, yet realistic western caked in revenge in desperation. The mere fact that the screenplay allows for character and character development of course means the film is a lot better than some other revenge flicks I have had to sit through over the years.

I think what I will take away from this film though is the excitement that surrounds the future of Victoria Wharfe McIntyre, Alexis Lane and Shaka Cook. I get a distinct feeling that McIntyre is going to be a great Australian director while it will not take long for Hollywood to come calling for Alexis Lane. Shaka Cook is also sensational in this film and of course has already been snapped up to be part of the Australian production of Hamilton.

While comparisons to the masterpiece that is The Nightingale is completely unfair in its own right The Flood is an amazing genre film that lifts the lid on some of the darker sides of Australian history.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Average Subculture Rating:

IMDB Rating:

The Flood (2020) on IMDb

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Trailer: