Tagged: Taylor John Smith

From the best-selling novel comes a captivating mystery. Where the Crawdads Sing tells the story of Kya, an abandoned girl who raised herself to adulthood in the dangerous marshlands of North Carolina. For years, rumours of the “Marsh Girl” haunted Barkley Cove, isolating the sharp and resilient Kya from her community. Drawn to two young men from town, Kya opens herself to a new and startling world; but when one of them is found dead, she is immediately cast by the community as the main suspect. As the case unfolds, the verdict as to what actually happened becomes increasingly unclear, threatening to reveal the many secrets that lay within the marsh.

Where the Crawdads Sing stars Daisy Edgar-Jones (Normal People) as “Kya Clark,” Taylor John Smith (Sharp Objects) as “Tate Walker,” Harris Dickinson (The King’s Man) as “Chase Andrews,” Michael Hyatt (Snowfall) as “Mabel,” Sterling Macer, Jr. (Double Down) as “Jumpin’,” and David Strathairn (Nomadland) as “Tom Milton.” Olivia Newman (First Match) directs the screenplay by Lucy Alibar (Beasts of the Southern Wild) based upon the novel by Delia Owens. The 3000 Pictures film is being produced by Reese Witherspoon and Lauren Neustadter.

Starring Daisy Edgar-Jones, Taylor John Smith, Harris Dickinson, Michael Hyatt, Sterling Macer, Jr. and David Strathairn

Directed by Olivia Newman

Produced by Reese Witherspoon and Lauren Neustadter

Based on the best-selling novel by Delia Owens.

From the best-selling novel comes a captivating mystery. Where the Crawdads Sing tells the story of Kya, an abandoned girl who raised herself to adulthood in the dangerous marshlands of North Carolina. For years, rumours of the “Marsh Girl” haunted Barkley Cove, isolating the sharp and resilient Kya from her community. Drawn to two young men from town, Kya opens herself to a new and startling world; but when one of them is found dead, she is immediately cast by the community as the main suspect. As the case unfolds, the verdict as to what actually happened becomes increasingly unclear, threatening to reveal the many secrets that lay within the marsh.

Where the Crawdads Sing stars Daisy Edgar-Jones (Normal People) as “Kya Clark,” Taylor John Smith (Sharp Objects) as “Tate Walker,” Harris Dickinson (The King’s Man) as “Chase Andrews,” Michael Hyatt (Snowfall) as “Mabel,” Sterling Macer, Jr. (Double Down) as “Jumpin’,” and David Strathairn (Nomadland) as “Tom Milton.” Olivia Newman (First Match) directs the screenplay by Lucy Alibar (Beasts of the Southern Wild) based upon the novel by Delia Owens. The 3000 Pictures film is being produced by Reese Witherspoon and Lauren Neustadter.

Starring Daisy Edgar-Jones, Taylor John Smith, Harris Dickinson, Michael Hyatt, Sterling Macer, Jr. and David Strathairn

Directed by Olivia Newman

Produced by Reese Witherspoon and Lauren Neustadter

Based on the best-selling novel by Delia Owens.

Summary:  Travis Block is a government operative coming to terms with his shadowy past. When he discovers a plot targeting U.S. citizens, Block finds himself in the crosshairs of the FBI director he once helped protect.

Year: 2022

Cinema Release Dates:  10th February 2022 (Australia), 24th February 2022 (Thailand), 11th February 2022 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: China, Australia, USA

Director: Mark Williams

Screenwriter: Nick May

Cast: Caroline Brazier (Sarah), Tim Draxl (Drew Hawthorne), Georgia Flood (Pearl), Clara Helms (Blaire Wright), Mel Jarnson (Sofia Flores), Zac Lemons (Wallace), Liam Neeson (Travis Bock), Aidan Quinn (Gabriel Robinson), Emmy Raver-Lampman (Mira Jones), NF Ravi (Kennele Tanara), Gabriella Sengos (Natalie Block), Andrew Shaw (Jordan Lockhart), Taylor John Smith (Dusty Crane), Yael Stone (Helen Davidson), Claire van der Boom (Amanda Block), Andriana Williams (Margaret Robinson)

Running Time: 104 mins

Classification: M (Australia), 15 (Thailand), 12A (UK), PG-13 (USA)

OUR BLACKLIGHT REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Blacklight Review:

Over the past decade actor Liam Neeson has established himself as an action hero in sleek thrillers that you can normally guarantee are better than the stock standard films in the genre. Even his films that take a more indie approach, like The Ice Road, always seem to have something about them that makes them an enjoyable watch from beginning to end. That tradition continues with Neeson’s latest film – Blacklight from director Mark Williams (Honest Thief).

Set amongst the current political turmoil of the United States Blacklight follows the events that occur when a political candidate is killed in what appears to be a hit and run accident. Intrepid journalist Mira Jones (Emmy Raver-Lampman – The Umbrella Academy) finds herself doubting that the incident was an accident especially after ‘wanted man’ Dusty Crane (Taylor John Smith – Hunter Killer) tries to contact her about it.

This puts Mira onto the radar of the FBI’s Mr Fix-It, Travis Block (Neeson – Schindler’s List), who is asked to pull Dusty off the street and put him into ‘rehab’. This is a job that Block has done 100s of times previously but it is also a job that has ruined him mentally and causes friction between himself and his daughter, Amanda (Claire van der Boom – Red Hill).

Blacklight may not exactly be a cinematic masterpiece but it is certainly an enjoyable film to watch. First time feature film screenwriter Nick May fills the story with intrigue and suspense while also remembering to make the characters likable for the audience. Neeson’s character, Block, is the kind of the character that would normally be the ‘bad guy’ in these types of films. Instead here May makes him a likable character by showing him in tender moments with not only his daughter but also his granddaughter (Gabriella Sengos ).

The plot allows for Block’s character arc to become just as much as a learning curve as Mira’s investigation is. May is also a smart enough screenwriter to know that a film like this works better with a mix of action and dramatic moments. Often throughout this film scenes between Mira sitting down and talking to her colleagues or speaking with Block are just as suspenseful ad the moments when people are fighting for their lives.

May’s screenplay is further enhanced by the work of director Mark Williams. Williams delivers some pretty spectacular car and foot chases all with the city of Melbourne providing a perfect and picturesque back-drop. Williams seems to bring the same intensity to Blacklight that is created on the show that he produces – Ozark, and the result is a film that is guaranteed to bring the big cinematic suspenseful moments all while revealing more about characters that the audience are drawn closer to. The result is a film where the audience are often on the edge of their seat as they actually care what is going to happen when a character’s life is put in danger.

If you need any further proof that Williams is a sensational director when it comes to the action-thriller genre look no further than the brilliant scenes here as Block is cornered inside a house by a team of men sent to kill him. The inventive way and shot selection that Williams and his cinematographer, Shelly Johnson (Captain America: The First Avenger), use make this something pretty special.

Once again Neeson seems to enjoy the thrill of being in such a film – he is a master of this genre now and it once again shows in his performance here. He is also well supported by Emmy Raver-Lampman who reveals herself as somebody that Hollywood needs to consider for bigger roles while Aussie Claire van der Boom is her usual brilliant self.

At the end of the day what you get here is what we have come to expect from Liam Neeson recently – a slick crime-thriller that draws its audience in with just the right mix of action and drama. If you are a fan of the thriller genre then certainly take a trip to the cinema to check this one out.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Alex First, Greg King and Peter Krausz’s Marry Me Review:

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You can read our review of Blacklight that appeared in The Phuket News here –

https://www.thephuketnews.com/neeson-shines-in-blacklight-83232.php

Trailer:

Summary: A female pilot is met with hostility when she joins an all male crew during World War II. However the issues between them soon pale into insignificance when they discover they have a ‘monster’ on board.

Year: 2020

Cinema Release Dates: 14th January 2021 (Australia)

VOD Release Dates: 1st January 2021 (USA)

Country: New Zealand, USA

Director: Roseanne Liang

Screenwriter: Max Landis, Roseanne Liang

Cast: Byron Coll (Terrence Taggart), Beulah Koale (Anton Williams), Chloe Grace Moretz (Maude Garrett), Callan Mulvey (John Reeves), Nick Robinson (Stu Beckell), Taylor John Smith (Walter Quaid), Benedict Wall (Tommy Dorn), John Witowski (Bradley Finch)

Running Time: 83 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia), R (USA)

OUR SHADOW IN THE CLOUD REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Shadow In The Cloud Review:

Shadow In The Cloud is the kind of film that doesn’t know what it wants to be when it grows up… and I think I like it that way. As a film it is as much a monster horror as it is a war film and it is just as much sci-fi/fantasy as it is a thriller… yes, it is a very hard film to try and pigeon-hole. That all gets even trickier when I point out that three-quarters of the action of the film takes place in a small section of a place that barely gives leads actress Chloe Grace-Moretz (Kick-Ass) room to physically move.

Moretz plays Maude Garrett a young woman who boards an Air Force plane in New Zealand right at the height of World War II. The all male crew which include John Reeves (Callan Mulvey – Captain America: The Winter Soldier) and Anton Williams (Beulah Koale – The Last Saint) are suddenly put out by having a ‘dame’ on their plane. Most make disgusting and degrading comments about what they would like to do to the ‘bird’ with very few making any effort to protect her. The general consensus is that they certainly don’t want a woman on their plane when they are already running such a mundane mission.

Maude’s only saving grace is the mystery surrounding the highly secretive package that she is carrying and the fact that she carries orders from a high ranking officer that the others fear. With very little space on board the flight though they stow Maude away from the rest of the crew and it is only then that secrets start to be revealed as she is one of the first to spot the ‘gremlin’ that is ripping apart the plane and the fact that they are being shadowed by enemy planes.

I am still a little confused at what director Roseanne Liang (My Wedding And Other Secrets) was trying to create with this film? Was she trying to turn Chloe Grace Moretz into an action hero like we recently saw with Milla Jovovich in Monster Hunter or was she trying for something a little more. Certainly there is something that I liked about this film despite some of its weaknesses. I loved the twists and turns that the plot took as secrets started to be revealed – yes they are kind of hard to believe but at the same time I was watching a movie where a winged creature was attacking a plane as well.

What I do know is that the action worked and we saw a new string in the bow of the acting talents of Moretz. At times here she is asked to put in a theatre like performance in a tight space while also playing an action lead – a weird mix that I dare say would not be able to be pulled off by many performers out there. The creature looks amazing, no surprise there seeing it was created by Weta Workshop, but the film is sometimes let down by its cheesy soundtrack and at times dodgy looking CGI which I guess I was supposed to over-look as part of the film’s steam-punk vibe.

Liang also successfully makes her point about sexism in the workplace. What the all male crew (who for a majority of the film are reduced to voices over a radio) say about Maude is disgusting and I am pretty sure it would have even the most hardened chauvinist seeing the errors of his ways. She also reveals aside of history that a lot like to ignore – the role of women during the World Wars… no they were not all at home darning socks.

At the end of the day Shadow In The Cloud does work. The action sequences on board the plane suggest that Liang is a director that we need to be watching in the future while the final battle sequence may have been simple but it is exactly what I felt was needed to finish off the film.

This film once again reminded me of the acting force that is Chloe Grace Moretz and has made me place Roseanne Liang on my list of directors to watch in the future. Shadow In The Cloud might be a mixing of genres but it is certainly worth the admission fee at the box office.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

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Shadow in the Cloud (2020) on IMDb

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