Tagged: Liam Neeson

Summary:  Travis Block is a government operative coming to terms with his shadowy past. When he discovers a plot targeting U.S. citizens, Block finds himself in the crosshairs of the FBI director he once helped protect.

Year: 2022

Cinema Release Dates:  10th February 2022 (Australia), 24th February 2022 (Thailand), 11th February 2022 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: China, Australia, USA

Director: Mark Williams

Screenwriter: Nick May

Cast: Caroline Brazier (Sarah), Tim Draxl (Drew Hawthorne), Georgia Flood (Pearl), Clara Helms (Blaire Wright), Mel Jarnson (Sofia Flores), Zac Lemons (Wallace), Liam Neeson (Travis Bock), Aidan Quinn (Gabriel Robinson), Emmy Raver-Lampman (Mira Jones), NF Ravi (Kennele Tanara), Gabriella Sengos (Natalie Block), Andrew Shaw (Jordan Lockhart), Taylor John Smith (Dusty Crane), Yael Stone (Helen Davidson), Claire van der Boom (Amanda Block), Andriana Williams (Margaret Robinson)

Running Time: 104 mins

Classification: M (Australia), 15 (Thailand), 12A (UK), PG-13 (USA)

OUR BLACKLIGHT REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Blacklight Review:

Over the past decade actor Liam Neeson has established himself as an action hero in sleek thrillers that you can normally guarantee are better than the stock standard films in the genre. Even his films that take a more indie approach, like The Ice Road, always seem to have something about them that makes them an enjoyable watch from beginning to end. That tradition continues with Neeson’s latest film – Blacklight from director Mark Williams (Honest Thief).

Set amongst the current political turmoil of the United States Blacklight follows the events that occur when a political candidate is killed in what appears to be a hit and run accident. Intrepid journalist Mira Jones (Emmy Raver-Lampman – The Umbrella Academy) finds herself doubting that the incident was an accident especially after ‘wanted man’ Dusty Crane (Taylor John Smith – Hunter Killer) tries to contact her about it.

This puts Mira onto the radar of the FBI’s Mr Fix-It, Travis Block (Neeson – Schindler’s List), who is asked to pull Dusty off the street and put him into ‘rehab’. This is a job that Block has done 100s of times previously but it is also a job that has ruined him mentally and causes friction between himself and his daughter, Amanda (Claire van der Boom – Red Hill).

Blacklight may not exactly be a cinematic masterpiece but it is certainly an enjoyable film to watch. First time feature film screenwriter Nick May fills the story with intrigue and suspense while also remembering to make the characters likable for the audience. Neeson’s character, Block, is the kind of the character that would normally be the ‘bad guy’ in these types of films. Instead here May makes him a likable character by showing him in tender moments with not only his daughter but also his granddaughter (Gabriella Sengos ).

The plot allows for Block’s character arc to become just as much as a learning curve as Mira’s investigation is. May is also a smart enough screenwriter to know that a film like this works better with a mix of action and dramatic moments. Often throughout this film scenes between Mira sitting down and talking to her colleagues or speaking with Block are just as suspenseful ad the moments when people are fighting for their lives.

May’s screenplay is further enhanced by the work of director Mark Williams. Williams delivers some pretty spectacular car and foot chases all with the city of Melbourne providing a perfect and picturesque back-drop. Williams seems to bring the same intensity to Blacklight that is created on the show that he produces – Ozark, and the result is a film that is guaranteed to bring the big cinematic suspenseful moments all while revealing more about characters that the audience are drawn closer to. The result is a film where the audience are often on the edge of their seat as they actually care what is going to happen when a character’s life is put in danger.

If you need any further proof that Williams is a sensational director when it comes to the action-thriller genre look no further than the brilliant scenes here as Block is cornered inside a house by a team of men sent to kill him. The inventive way and shot selection that Williams and his cinematographer, Shelly Johnson (Captain America: The First Avenger), use make this something pretty special.

Once again Neeson seems to enjoy the thrill of being in such a film – he is a master of this genre now and it once again shows in his performance here. He is also well supported by Emmy Raver-Lampman who reveals herself as somebody that Hollywood needs to consider for bigger roles while Aussie Claire van der Boom is her usual brilliant self.

At the end of the day what you get here is what we have come to expect from Liam Neeson recently – a slick crime-thriller that draws its audience in with just the right mix of action and drama. If you are a fan of the thriller genre then certainly take a trip to the cinema to check this one out.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Alex First, Greg King and Peter Krausz’s Marry Me Review:

Alex’s rating Out Of 5:

Greg’s rating Out Of 5:

Peter’s rating Out Of 5:

Average Subculture Rating:

Other Subculture Blacklight Reviews:

You can read our review of Blacklight that appeared in The Phuket News here –

https://www.thephuketnews.com/neeson-shines-in-blacklight-83232.php

Trailer:

A troubled off-the-books fixer for the FBI Travis Block (Liam Neeson), tasked with pulling undercover agents out of dangerous situations, finds himself in the middle of a deadly conspiracy when an undercover agent starts questioning the very people he’s working for. Block, must not only track down the agent, but also find out the truth. A truth that may strain even his questionable moral code.

Thanks to our good friends at Rialto Distribution we have ten passes to giveaway to Blacklight. To win simply go to our Facebook page, like it and then private message us telling us what your favourite Liam Neeson movie is.

Summary: A rancher finds himself in a vicious war about the cabal after he tries to rescue a mother and her son.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates: 21st January 2021 (Australia), 15th January 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Robert Lorenz

Screenwriter: Chris Charles, Danny Kravitz, Robert Lorenz

Cast: Kellen Boyle (Dalton), Christian Hicks (Danny), Roger Jerome (Otto), Dylan Kenin (Randall), Antonio Leyba (Rigo), Jose Mijangos (Emilio), Liam Neeson (Jim), Jacob Perez (Miguel), Yediel Quiles (Jorge), Alfredo Quiroz (Carlos), Juan Pablo Raba (Mauricio), Luce Rains (Everitt), Ann Barrett Richards (Bartender Clara), Sean A. Rosales (Hernando), Teresa Ruiz (Rosa), Jose Vasquez (Isidro), Katheryn Winnick (Sarah)

Running Time: 108 mins

Classification: M (Australia), PG-13 (USA)

THE MARKSMAN REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ The Marksman Review:

If Clint Eastwood watches The Marksman and then says “that Irishman is taking my roles” then you really couldn’t blame him. The Marksman’s hero Jim is almost your stereotypical Eastwood role. A rancher, almost disenfranchised with the world around him who is lost in his sorrow and doesn’t mind a good drink now and then. Also like most Eastwood films this is a film with grit that is certainly a must see in the cinemas.

As you would guess Jim (Liam Neeson – The Grey) is a bit of a loner. He has been that way since the death of his wife a few years earlier. He spends his days working on his hard-hit ranch and occasionally helping out the US Border Forces when he finds illegal aliens who have made the dangerous trip over the Mexico/US border.

Jim is not a snitch though, no it seems like he phones in his reports due to the fact that his step-daughter Sarah (Katheryn Winnick – Vikings) works for the border forces. However Jim sees a different side to the aliens crossing the border when he finds himself helping young Miguel (Jacob Perez – Papa Bear) and his mother Rosa (Teresa Ruiz – Narcos: Mexico) who cross the border with the cartel hot on their tail.

The resulting fire-fight sees Jim shoot dead several of the cartel members including the brother of determined leader Mauricio (Juan Pablo Raba – Peppermint) who then uses his corrupt colleagues to find his way into American and look for vengeance.

The plot of The Marksman is pretty simple. An ex-vet drives across country with a young refugee while being pursued by the cartel – it certainly wouldn’t have taken a scriptwriting genius to come up with the pretence. Why the film works is because director Robert Lorenz (Trouble With The Curve) and his other screenwriters steer the film away from the genre’s clichés and continually come up with the creative ways to see Jim and the cartel cross paths.

At times the film’s ‘road-trip’ vibe is a reminder of films like Roadkill and once the audience learns that no character is safe the film takes on a whole new level of suspense. It is that suspense and the great characterisation of Jim and Miguel that hold this film together. Yes, the character of Mauricio is a little stereotypical but at the same time he is so blood-thirsty it makes him a dangerous adversary that you never can predict the nature or actions of.

The real strength of this film though is the acting of Liam Neeson. Whether Neeson had made his mind up about walking away from action films before he made this film I guess we will never know but if this is his finale than at least he can say that he went out on top. So many action heroes turn up to make a film like this and bring nothing to the role – that certainly isn’t the case with Neeson playing rancher Jim.

Neeson puts life into Jim. He makes you care about the character and he can say more with one glance or facial expression that a page full of dialogue could. I recently said that with Honest Thief Neeson looked and showed his age, especially with some laboured chase scenes, but that certainly isn’t the case here. Here Neeson is reminiscent of Clint Eastwood in The Mule or Gran Torino. He is playing his age and it works. Yes this might just be an action drama but Neeson certainly brought his A-Game to the table.

The other strength to The Marksman is the fact that the film shows that every refugee has their own story but it never becomes preachy. There are no ‘up on the box’ moments as Jim launches into a ‘everybody must listen to this’ monologue. No instead the film simply tells the story at hand – a young boy needs the help of an American citizen in order to survive. It is surprising just how more powerful that makes the film.

The Marksman might not be the masterpiece that Let Him Go was but as far as modern day westerns go it is well worth a look. Suspenseful and brought alive by the talents of its leading man this is a film I more than happy to go back and re-visit.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Kyle McGrath’s The Marksman Review:

Kyle’s Score Out Of 5:

Average Subculture Rating:

IMDB Rating:

The Marksman (2021) on IMDb

Other Subculture The Marksman Reviews:

Nil.

Trailer:

Summary: A successful bank robber wants to start a new life with the woman that he loves. But dobbing himself into the FBI doesn’t go as he had planned.

Year: 2020

Cinema Release Dates: 5th November (Australia), 13th October (Thailand), 23rd October (UK), 16th October 2020 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Mark Williams

Screenwriter: Steve Allrich, Mark Williams

Cast: Jai Courtney (Agent Nivens), Jeffrey Donovan (Agent Meyers), Jasmine Cephas Jones (Beth Hall), Liam Neeson (Tom), Patty O’Neil (Sharon Baker), Robert Patrick (Agent Sam Baker), Anthony Ramos (Agent Hall), Kate Walsh (Annie), Birol Taran Yildiz (Boss Mike)

Running Time: 99 mins

Classification: M (Australia), 15 (Thailand), 15 (UK), Pg-13 (USA)

OUR HONEST THIEF REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Honest Thief Review:

At 68 years of age you could forgive actor Liam Neeson if he wanted to slow down. The good news for film lovers is that Neeson isn’t showing any sign of wanting to jump out of the fast lane any time soon. In fact while most actors have been starved of cinema time in 2020 Neeson is so hard working that he has two films released despite the pandemic.

Earlier this year we had a chance to watch his comedy Made In Italy and now we see him return to his more familiar crime thriller genre with Honest Thief. But be warned if you are expecting to see Neeson pull out his acting A-Game like he did in Schindler’s List or turn all Taken action star – think again. Honest Thief is very much a film that wasn’t too sure what it wanted to be.

Directed by Mark Williams (A Family Man) Honest Thief finds Neeson playing Tom, a gifted bank robber who has amassed $9 million in takings from a decade long crime spree that has left the FBI completely bewildered.

That all changes though when Tom meets the lovely Annie (Kate Walsh – Grey’s Anatomy) when she sells him storage space. He instantly falls in love and as the pair decide to settle down Tom hatches up a plan that will see him dob himself into the FBI and hand back all the money that he stole in return for a short two year jail sentence. It all sounds great in theory and probably would have worked if the Agent who turned up to make the deal wasn’t the corrupt Agent Nivens (Jai Courtney – Terminator Genisys).

Yes, reading through the plot you can see that Honest Thief sets itself up to be a Fugitive style thriller, but sadly something went horribly wrong in the screen-writing of this film. It seems that somewhere along the line the team of screenwriters, Williams and Steve Allrich (The Canyon) became unsure whether this should be a thinking person’s thriller or an all action affair with car chases and shootouts. The result is a film that has a confusing, mixed pace to it that closely resembles more of the B-Grade films that Allrich normally writes than a film that is worthy to have acting royalty like Liam Neeson in it.

Don’t get me wrong – the story does work and characters like Tom, Annie and Nivens are interesting enough but there is a huge problem with the pace of the film. It will go from a heart-pounding tense scene with Tom facing off against Nivens straight into a six minute dialogue driven snooze-fest scene between Tom and Annie. It feels like lighting a campfire and then pouring water on it before anyone has time to cook the marshmallows.

That certainly wasn’t what I was expecting from a film with Williams at the helm. Over the past couple of years Williams has shown with his producing that he is normally attracted to gritty projects. Shows like the amazing Ozark and the amazing Ben Affleck led The Accountant have led us to expect quality product with Williams attached to it, but with Honest Thief you are left wishing that more grittiness could have been injected into it.

The lacklustre screenplay means you never really get to see Neeson in full flight but he does enough to make you like Tom as a character and you are hoping that justice is served in his favour. The real winner here is Courtney. Like he did with Buffaloed earlier this year he relishes the opportunity to play the bad guy and is never over-awed with the scenes that he shares with Neeson. With the body of work that he has amassed over the past few years Courtney is becoming one of the most intriguing actors in Hollywood at the moment.Honest Thief is certainly not one of Liam Neeson’s best films but some Neeson is better than no Neeson at all, right? In a year where we have all been starved for cinema release films Honest Thief may just attract more fans than it normally would.

Dave’s Rating Out Of 5:

Kyle McGrath’s Honest Thief Review:

Kyle’s Rating Out Of 5:

Average Subculture Rating:

IMDB Rating:

Honest Thief (2020) on IMDb

Other Subculture Honest Thief Reviews:

You can read our review of Honest Thief that appeared in The Phuket News here.

Trailer:

Summary: The surviving members of the resistance face the First Order once again, and the legendary conflict between the Jedi and the Sith reaches its peak bringing the Skywalker saga to its end.

Year: 2020

Australian Cinema Release Date: 19th December 2019

Thailand Cinema Release Date: 19th December 2019

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: J.J.Abrams

Screenwriter: J.J. Abrams, Chris Terrio

Cast: Gerald W Abrams (Captain Cypress), J.J. Abrams (D-O (voice)), Naomi Ackie (Jannah), Josef Altin (Pilot Vanik), John Boyega (Finn), Lynn Robertson Bruce (D-O/Sith Alchamist), Dave Chapman (BB-8), Hayden Christensen (Anakin Skywalker (voice)), Richard Coombs (Maz Kanata), Aidan Cook (Boolio), Liam Cook (Ochi of Bestoon), Olivia d’Abo (Luminara Unduli (voice)), Anthony Daniels (c-3PO), Harrison Davis (Pommet Warrick), Warwick Davis (Wicket W. Warrick), Matt Denton (Maz Kanata), Mandeep Dhillon (Lieutenant Garam), Adam Driver (Kylo Ren), Ashley Eckstein (Ahsoka Tano (voice)), Amir El-Masry (Commander Track), Carrie Fisher (Leia Organa (archival footage)), Cailey Fleming (Young Rey), Harrison Ford (Han Solo), Geff Francis (Admiral Griss), Domhnall Gleeson (General Hux), Richard E. Grant (General Pryde), Greg Grunberg (Snap Wexley), Alec Guiness (Obi Wan Kenobi (voice)), Robin Guiver (D-O), Amanda Hale (Officer Kandia), Jennifer Hale (Aayla Secura (voice)), Mark Hamill (Luke Skywalker), Claire Roi Harvey (Maz Kanata), Shirley Henderson (Babu Frik (voice)), Carolyn Hennesy (Demine Lithe), Brian Herring (BB-8), Oscar Isaac (Poe Dameron), Josefine Irrera Jackson (Young Rey), Samuel L. Jackson (Mace Windu (voice)), James Earl Jones (Darth Vader (voice)), Paul Kasey (Cai Threnalli), Nick Kellington (Klaud), Diana Kent (General Engell), Amanda Lawrence (Commander D’Arcy), Denis Lawson (Wedge Antilles), Billie Lourd (Lieutenant Connix), Ian McDiarmid (Emperor Palpatine), Ewan McGregor (Obi Wan Kenobi (voice)),  Dominic Monaghan (Beaumont),  Tanya Moodie (General Parnadee), Liam Neeson (Qui-Gon Jinn (voice)), Lupita Nyong’o (Maz Kanata), Frank Oz (Yoda (voice)), Simon Paisley Day (General Quinn), Angelique Perrin (Adi Gallia (voice)), Freddie Prinze Jnr. (Kana Jarrus (voice)), Mike Quinn (Nien Nunb), Daisy Ridley (Rey), Vinette Robinson (Pilot Tyce), Alison Rose (Lieutenant Draper), Kipsang Rotich (Nien Nunb (voice)), Keri Russell (Zorii Bliss), Philica Saunders (Tabala Zo), Andy Serkis (Snoke (voice)), Kiran Shah (Nambi Ghima), Joonas Suotamo (Chewbacca), Hassan Taj (R2-D2), Chris Terrio (Colonel Aftab Ackbar (voice)), Lee Towersey (R2-D2), Kelly Marie Tran (Rose Tico), Billy Dee Williams (Lando Calrissian), John Williams (Oma Tres), Patrick Williams (Boolio (voice)), Debra Wilson (Nambi Ghima (voice)), Tom Wilton (Colonel Aftab Ackbar), Matthew Wood (Cai Threnally (voice))

Running Time: 142 mins

Classification: M (Australia) TBC (Thailand)

 

 

OUR STAR WARS: RISE OF SKYWALKER REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths Review:

It has taken forty-two years to get there, but finally the Skywalker saga is drawing to a close. No other cinematic franchise has ever reached the massive heights that Star Wars has and to say that this is a beloved series is under-selling it in a very big way. It is for that reason that J.J. Abrams has had one of the most difficult jobs that any filmmaker could ever dream of, it is up to him to close this much loved chapter in the Star Wars story in a way that will please a legion of fans world-wide.

Leading into Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker that story had been thrown into turmoil both on and off the screen. On screen we saw the death of Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) and the apparent return of Emperor Palpatine (Ian McDiarmid). Off screen all Star Wars fans were rocked with the tragic death of actress Carrie Fisher which they knew would impact the storyline of the final film.

Abrams doesn’t leave fans waiting with The Rise Of Skywalker very quickly getting down to business. Kylo Ren (Adam Driver) is on the hunt for Palpatine, while Finn (John Boyega), Poe (Oscar Isaac) and Chewbacca (Joonas Suotamo) search for an artefact that will allow Rey (Daisy Ridley) to face Palpatine, while they try to stop the massive First Order forces who are ready to once again take over the universe.

The plot maybe simple but certainly does not fail to entertain. Early on the film feels episodic simply moving from one story to another in a specific order but once it breaks those shackles the film mirrors the energy and entertainment that we all come to love from the original Star Wars films. But while the film does entertain it also does have its flaws. With the plot having so much going on there are times when it feels like it doesn’t spend enough time raising the levels of suspense, something that is very surprising considering that some of the lives in danger here are some of the most loved characters in cinematic history.

Still for the most of the part of the film Abrams keeps things simple but effective. Once it established that all characters could meet their end this time around that goes some way to keeping the audience on their toes while the final epic battle is something that true Star Wars fans have dreamt of for a long time. Unlike a lot of franchises this chapter does close with a finale that will leave fans happy and is should be noted that Disney does leave the door slightly ajar if they ever wish to continue the saga.

What makes this instalment so enjoyable though is the acting, and that is not something we have been able to say about every Star Wars instalment. Adam Driver shows in this film why he is one of the best actors in Hollywood at the moment. It is obvious that he doesn’t move into a lower acting gear because he is in an epic blockbuster here, instead he puts as much drama and emotion into his Marriage Story and Paterson… the former role which is talked about possibly earning him an Oscar nomination.

Driver is well matched on screen by Daisy Ridley whose acting prowess has continued to grow throughout this trilogy. Johy Boyega  and Oscar Isaac also deliver their goods but at the end of the day this film is literally Driver versus Ridley and that shows right up to the last amazing and memorable crescendo.

Star Wars: The Rise Of Skywalker is a film that is going to be embraced by the hardened Star Wars fans out there, something we can breathe a sigh of relief over since the disappointment of the Game Of Thrones finale. The Rise Of Skywalker is light but thoroughly entertains.

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:

 

 

IMDB Rating:  Star Wars: Episode IX - The Rise of Skywalker (2019) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Star Wars: The Rise Of Skywalker Reviews:

Our Stars Wars: The Rise Of Skywalker review that appeared in ‘The Phuket News’ can be read at this link – https://www.thephuketnews.com/rise-of-the-skywalker-will-give-you-palpatations-74177.php

Trailer:

 

Thanks to our good friends at Studio Canal Subculture has ten double passes to giveaway to the brand new film Cold Pursuit which hits cinemas on Feb 7th.

To WIN simply go to our Facebook page and tell us what your favourite Liam Neeson movie is.

Welcome to Kehoe, it’s -10 degrees and counting at this glitzy ski resort in the Rocky Mountains. The local police aren’t used to much action until the son of unassuming town snowplough driver, Nels Coxman (Liam Neeson – Schindler’s List, The Grey), is murdered at the order of Viking (Tom Bateman – Murder On The Orient Express, Da Vinci’s Demons), a flamboyant drug lord. Fueled by rage and armed with heavy machinery, Nels sets out to dismantle the cartel one man at a time, but his understanding of murder comes mainly from what he read in a crime novel. As the bodies pile up, his actions ignite a turf war between Viking and his long-standing rival White Bull (Tom Jackson – Star Trek: The Next Generation, Skinwalkers), a soulful Native-American mafia boss, that will quickly escalate and turn the small town’s bright white slopes blood-red. In-Cinemas February 7.

Cold Pursuit will be released in Australian cinemas through Studio Canal on the 7th February 2019.

 

The Men in Black have always protected the Earth from the scum of the universe.  In this new adventure, they tackle their biggest, most global threat to date: a mole in the Men in Black organization… and now you can view it all in this brand new trailer.

Directed by F. Gary Gray and starring Chris Hemsworth, Tessa Thompson, Rebecca Ferguson, Liam Neeson and Emma Thompson Men In Black: International will be released in cinemas on the 13th June, 2019.