Tagged: Diane Kruger

Seduced And Abandoned

Summary: Alec Baldwin and filmmaker James Toback are on a mission: to remake Bernardo Bertolucci’s legendary 1972 film Last Tango in Paris by setting it in Iraq in the mid-2000s. Hobnobbing their way around Cannes, the wisecracking duo meet up with a who’s who of the film industry , including Francis Ford Coppola, Martin Scorsese, Ryan Gosling and Bertolucci himself, as they try to find money, a script and a cast for their impossible idea.

Seduced and Abandoned is the delightful and utterly uncategorisable new pseudo-documentary from veteran director James Toback. A riff on the harsh economics of modern film turned unlikely buddy comedy, it’s a glimpse into the funny film business and a gleeful homage to a lost time when film was made for film’s sake.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 8th May, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: James Toback

Screenwriter: James Toback

Cast: Alec Baldwin (himself), Berenice Bejo (herself), Bernardo Bertolucci (himself), James Caan (himself),Neve Campbell (herself), Jessica Chastain (herself), Francis Ford Coppola (himself), Scott Foundas (himself), Ryan Gosling (himself), Charlotte Kirk (herself), Diane Kruger (herself), Todd McCarthy (himself), Roman Polanski (himself), Ben Schneider (himself), Thorsten Schumacher (himself), Martin Scorsese (himself), Jeremy Thomas (himself)

Runtime: 98 mins

Classification: MA15+

OUR SEDUCED AND ABANDONED REVIEWS & RATINGS:

David Griffiths:

Seduced And Abandoned is a hard documentary to explain. Not just for this lowly reviewer but you get a feeling that even the guys responsible for this film may have some trouble trying to pinpoint what the exact focus of this documentary actually is. This reeks as the kind of film that may have sounded like a good idea when a group of friends got together over a few drinks, but sadly when it reaches the big screen it becomes a meandering film that was well deserved of the walk outs it received at the screening I was at.

At the heart of Seduced And Abandoned are film director James Toback (Tyson, When Will I Be Loved) and actor Alec Baldwin (Blue Jasmine, TV’S 30 Rock) who have come up with the idea of remaking the classic Last Tango In Paris but setting it in Bush-era Iraq. It seems the original concept of the documentary was show them travelling to the Cannes Film Festival on a mission to receive backing for the film, but somewhere along the way the film got railroaded and ended up becoming a look at the history of the Film Festival itself and also how the likes of Ryan Gosling, Roman Polanski and Martin Scorsese got their starts in Hollywood.

One of the things that makes Seduced And Abandoned such a strange documentary is that seems that Baldwin and Toback really wanted this to be the kind of film that really celebrates cinema. Certainly that seems to be what is happening when they sit down and talk to Polanski, Scorsese, Francis Ford Coppola and Bernardo Bertolucci, but during the film it actually begins to show the darkside of the industry – a side where people such as Neve Campbell and Oscar winner  Berenice Bejo find themselves as being described as ‘unmarketable.’

If Toback and Baldwin wanted Seduced And Abandoned to showcase themselves in the realm of a vanity piece then they certainly failed in their mission. Instead Toback comes across as a pushy director who believes that he deserves to be credited alongside the Scorseses and Coppolas of this world while Baldwin seems to be an actor who refuses to acknowledge that he is no longer a Hollywood leading man. At times this comes across as a poorly directed and cheaply edited wank fest, although it is kind of fun to watch as Baldwin gets put in his place by several producers and even an Australian film distributor.

Having said that though there are some highlights during Seduced And Abandoned. Hearing the likes of Ryan Gosling and Diane Kruger talking about what it means to be an actor in Hollywood these days is an interesting piece of cinema, as is hearing some of the legendary directors that we all look up to talking about their careers and what film-making means to them. Those interviews are absolutely priceless for young filmmakers out there.

Seduced And Abandoned ultimately fails at its major goals and is only made watchable by a couple of interviews that touch on some cinematic magic.

Stars(1)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(1)

IMDB Rating:  Seduced and Abandoned (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Seduced And Abandoned′: Nil.

Trailer:

Farewell My Queen

Summary: Farewell, My Queen marks the return of acclaimed director Benoît Jacquot and brilliantly captures the passions, debauchery, occasional glimpses of nobility and ultimately the chaos that engulfed the court of Marie Antoinette in the final days before the full-scale outbreak of the Revolution. Based on the best-selling novel by Chantal Thomas, the film stars Léa Seydoux as one of Marie’s ladies-in-waiting, seemingly an innocent but quietly working her way into her mistress’s special favors, until history tosses her fate onto a decidedly different path. With the action moving effortlessly from the gilded drawing rooms of the nobles to the back quarters of those who serve them, this is a period film at once accurate and sumptuous in its visual details and modern in its emotions.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 6th June, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: France, Spain

Director: Benoit Jacquot

Screenwriter: Benoit Janquot, Gilles Taurand, Chantal Thomas (novel)

Cast: Xavier Beauvois (Louis XVI), Anne Benoit (Rose Bertin), Jacques Boudet (Monsieur de la Tour de Pin), Marthe Caufman (Alice), Lolita Chammah (Louison), Martine Chevallier (Madame de la Tour Du Pin), Vladimir Consigny (Rene dit Paolo), Jean-Pierre Guerin (Monsieur Jnavier), Jacques Herlin (Marquis de Vaucouleurs), Sonia Joubert (Augustine), Diane Kruger (Marie Antoinette), Virginie Ledoyen (Gabrielle de Polignac), Noemie Lvosky (Henriette Genest), Tibo Motte (Gustav), Jacques Nolot (Monsieur de Jolivet), Veronique Nordey (Madame Tournon), Julie-Marie Parmentier (Honorine Aubert), Yves Penay (Monsieur de Barentin), Herve Pierre (Herisse), Aladin Reibel (Cornu de la Baliviere), Dominique Reymond (Madame de Rochereuil), Michael Robin (Jacob-Nicolas Moreau), Lea Seydoux (Agathe-Sidonie Laborde)

Runtime: 100 mins

Classification:M

SUBCULTURE MEDIA/THE GOOD THE BAD THE UGLY FILM SHOW REVIEWS/RATINGS OF ‘FAREWELL, MY QUEEN’:

David Griffiths: Stars(4)

Please check Dave’s review of ‘Farewell, My Queen’ that is available on The Helium Entertainment Channel

Greg King: Stars(3)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘Farewell, My Queen’ that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3.5)

IMDB Rating:  Farewell, My Queen (2012) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Farewell, My Queen′:Please check Episode #35 of ‘The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show‘ for a comprehensive review of ‘Farewell, My Queen’.

Trailer:

The Host

Summary: The Host is a riveting story about the survival of love and the human spirit in a time of war. Our world has been invaded by an unseen enemy. Humans become hosts for these invaders, their minds taken over while their bodies remain intact. Most of humanity has succumbed.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 28th March, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Andrew Niccol

Screenwriter: Andrew Niccol, Stephanie Meyer (novel)

Cast: Jake Abel (Ian O’Shea), Tailinh Agoyo (Seeker Robin), Phil Austin (Seeker Waverley), Marcus Lyle Brown (Healer Ford), Chandler Canterbury (Jamie), Stacey Carino (Seeker Dawn), Evan Cleaver (Seeker Pavo), Jalen Coleman (Soul Nafisa), Stephen Conroy (Seeker Sands), J.D. Evermore (Trevor Stryder), Frances Fisher (Maggie), Andrea Frankle (Healer Skye), Raedeen Greer (Lily), Lee Hardee (Aaron), Mustafa Harris (Brandt), Boyd Holbrook (Kyle), David House (Seeker Summers), William Hurt (Jeb), Max Irons (Jared Howe), Shyaam Karra (Soul Anshu), Diane Kruger (The Seeker), Scott Lawrence (Doc), Jhil McEntyre (Soul Lake), Tatanka Means (Seeker Hawke), Jaylen Moore (Seeker Song), Yohance Myles (Seeker Nova), Michael L. Parker (Seeker Wolfe), Shawn Carter Peterson (Wes), Stephen Rider (Seeker Reed), Rachel Roberts (Soul Fleur), Saoirse Ronan (Melanie/Wanda), Alex Russell (Seeker Burns), Eric Schultz (Seeker Zephyr), Ruby Lou Smith (Soul Pearle), Brent Wendell Williams (Soul Winters), John Wilmot (Soul Raines), Bokeem Woodbine (Nate)

Runtime: 125 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘The Host’ Review: Please check Dave’s review of ‘The Host’ that is available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘The Host′: Check Episode #26 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘The Host’.

Rating: 2/5

IMDB Rating:The Host (2013) on IMDb