Tagged: Blumhouse

 

There is no disputing that director/screenwriter Leigh Whannell is one of the kings of modern day horror. The Australian was the writer behind both the Saw and Insidious franchises while in recent years he has also sat in the director’s chair for films like Insidious: Chapter 3 and the under-appreciated Upgrade.

Now Whannell returns as the director/screenwriter/producer of The Invisible Man – a modern day Blumhouse take on one of Universal Pictures most loved horror characters. And as we chat to Whannell in Melbourne we learn that this is not a task that he took lightly.

“I actually wasn’t thinking about doing an Invisible Man movie at all, says Whannell as we begin to talk about the origins of this film. “I had just finished Upgrade and I had been bitten by the action movie bug and I think I was keen to go and shoot the fifty million dollar version of Upgrade. You know we could crash forty cars instead of one car… i was keen to get my Michael Bay on. Then this idea was suggested to me… the idea of doing The Invisible Man and it was not something that I had given any thought to, but then as soon as it was in my mind it was truly an inception.”

“It wouldn’t leave my brain,” says Whannell with a big smile on his face revealing just how excited he was about the product. “It just kept taking up space rent free. And then I just couldn’t stop thinking about it and that is usually the first sign that I am going to make a film – when it just won’t go away. That’s how it came about and then I just went back to Blumhouse and Universal and said that I was interested in doing this and we were off to the races. It was remarkable just how quickly the pieces all came together.”

As we begin to talk craft I ask Whannell whether or not the fact that the idea of the film was planted in his mind rather than him just thinking it up changed the way he went about writing the original screenplay. “It did in the sense that I was aware of this legacy that was behind me,” he says after pausing to think about the question for a moment. “Other people have made Invisible Man movies and I wanted to avoid repeating them. I didn’t want anybody to be able to say ‘well this is just a retread of so and so.’ And so if anything it was more of an awareness to avoid those other movies- that was the biggest thing – trying to take this character and modernise it and make it very new. In other words I wanted to make it feel like no other Invisible Man movie had ever existed and that this was the first. I can’t tell you how many scenes I came up with that I put on the reject pile because I felt that they had been done before.”

Whannell’s version of The Invisible Man takes on a very different voice to any of the Invisible Man films of the past have. Here Whannell explores the dark topic of domestic violence and depicts in a very dark way that few filmmakers have been brave enough to do in the past. “Really early on I knew that I wanted it to be dark,” he explains. “I knew that I wanted to make something that was really tense and suffocating – not light-hearted at all. I didn’t want anything that was frolicking or fun I wanted to make something that was really relentlessly tense and suffocating to the audience.”

“That was a decision that I made very early on and then I began building out the story,” he explains. “The thematic elements of the movie about a woman being in an abusive relationship that just came out organically. As you start to put the pieces out on the table those things just kind of emerge on their own without you forcing them. It was all really organic and that is how it all fell together.”

With the legacy of the Invisible Man being so entrenched in Hollywood history and certain amount of fandom is also there, and that is something that Whannell is more than aware of. “Any movie whether it has a legacy like The Invisible Man or if it is stand-alone like Upgrade makes me nervous,” he says laughing out loud. “Even just thinking about it now is making me nervous. I think it is because you put so much of yourself into a movie an then you release it to the world and they get to judge it and it is just a scary moment. Eventually the nerves ease off once the movie is out there and you can’t do anything about it. Then you a start to relax but right now I am right in the middle of the white hot centre of nerves because it is just starting to get out there.”

 

The Invisible Man opens in cinemas today.

It is that time of the year when we reflect on what was good and what was bad in 2019. We start with the worst films of 2019.

  1. Black Christmas

The first dud from the Blumhouse house of horror. Black Christmas tried to be political with the gender game but ended up being so offense even the female audience found it deplorable.

  1. Little

This alleged comedy starring Regina Hall took the old ‘older person becomes younger self to learn a lesson’ Hollywood trope and completely killed it…unfunny in every sense.

  1. After

Based on a hit novel doesn’t necessarily mean success and that was certainly the case for the teenage romance After. Good girl meets bad guy with a reputation but with zero chemistry on screen and a story so transparent anybody could see through it, this was a real stinker.

  1. Gemini Man

Will Smith and director Ang Lee teamed up with what should have been one of the action films of the decade. But the new crystal clear technology only damaged an already flawed film.

  1. Dora And The Lost City Of Gold

You can argue this was a film for kids and shouldn’t be rated so harshly. But even kids struggled with a film that made its lead character seem childish instead of the hero that she should have been.

  1. What Men Want

A switch on the classic Mel Gibson film What Women Want. Re-make, re-boot… whatever this one was unfunny and missed its mark.

  1. Us

Once again Jordan Peele tried to be a little bit different with his horror film and once again it is left floundering with anything but a smart horror.

  1. Poms

Another ill-fated comedy, this time starring Diane Keaton who tries to introduce a cheerleading team to her local retirement home. While the film tries to expose some of the downsides of retirement villages it completely misses its mark and become a nothing film.

  1. It: Chapter Two

Early on it promised to be a hard-edged horror film but then it just fell away to be an ordinary horror film that seemed to mirror the first film.

  1. Godzilla: King Of Monsters

After the original film and Kong proved to be interesting this one just seemed to fall apart and become boring battle sequence after battle sequence with an out of the ordinary storyline that was nearly laughable.