Tagged: Brian Caspe

Summary: 
The bodyguard Michael Bryce continues his friendship with assassin Darius Kincaid as they try to save Darius’ wife Sonia.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates: 10th June 2021 (Australia), 14th June 2021 (UK), 5th August 2021 (Thailand), 16th June 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: Out in all regions.

Country: USA, UK

Director: Patrick Hughes

Screenwriter: Brandon Murphy, Phillip Murphy

Cast: Michael Aston (Giuseppe), Barry Atsma (Moreno), Ivor Bagaric (Young Bryce), Antonio Banderas (Aristotle Papdopolous), Bekka Bowling (Stewardess Clare), Brian Caspe (Wlter Fiscer), Anna-Maria Everett (Elena), Morgan Freeman (Senior), Caroline Goodall (Crowley), Michael Gor (Livtin), Richard E. Grant (Seifert), Frank Grillo (Bobby O’Neil), Salma Hayek (Sonia Kincaid), Tom Hopper (Magnusson), Samuel L. Jackson (Darius Kincaid), Jonny James (Johan), Tine Joustra (Renata Casoria), Kristofer Kamiyasu (Zento), Alice McMillan (Aislo), Dragan Micanovic (Vladimir), Gary Oldman (Vladislav Dukhovic), Ryan Reynolds (Michael Bryce), Blake Ritson (Gunther), Tsuwayuki Saotome (Kurosawa), Venice Smith (Gary), Gabriella Wright (Veronika), Milos Yerolemou (Carlo)

Running Time: 100 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia), 15 (UK), R (USA)

OUR THE HITMAN’S WIFE’S BODYGUARD REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ The Hitman’s Wife’s Bodyguard Review:

I’ve noticed over the years that often one of the reasons why sequels fail is because the filmmakers behind them try to make them too different to the original. There is often a hint of ‘well the hero learnt his lesson so he is different’ or ‘we wanted to go bigger and bolder than the first film.’ The end result is often a film that the fans of the original film end up giving a thumbs down.

Luckily Australian filmmaker Patrick Hughes (Red Hill) did not have any of those notions in his head when he approached The Hitman’s Wife’s Bodyguard. I said in my review for the original film – 2017 The Hitman’s Bodyguard – that it was a big dumb yet fun action film and that is exactly the same way that the sequel should be described.

Set a couple of years after the events of the first film legend-in-his-own-lunchbox bodyguard Michael  Bryce (Ryan Reynolds – Deadpool) finds himself de-registered as a bodyguard, something that he is having a difficult time trying to accept.

Just as a therapist talks him into taking a holiday Bryce suddenly finds himself in the middle of a blood-bath caused by the demanding and possibly psychopathic Sonia Kincaid (Salma Hayek – Dogma) who orders him to come with her and rescue her husband, notorious hitman Darius Kincaid (Samuel L. Jackson – Pulp Fiction).

As that rescue takes place though the trio soon find themselves being roped into an Interpol investigation being headed up by Bobby O’Neil (Frank Grillo – The Grey) who believes that Aristotle Papadopolous (Antonio Banderas – The Mask Of Zorro) is about to conduct a huge terrorist attack that could potentially affect the whole of Europe.

I’ll be honest this certainly isn’t a classic nor is it a film I’ll probably ever watch again but did I have fun while I was watching it – yes!!! Screenwriter Tom O’Connor (The Courier) brings the same recipe to the table that made the first film so enjoyable. As I watched this film I found myself laughing one second and then gasping the next as O’Connor again finds the right mixture of comedy and action an brings it all the table.

His screenplay does provide good laughs for Hayek and Jackson but as I was watching the film I found myself beginning to wonder whether Ryan Reynolds will ever get the opportunity to play a character that isn’t ‘cocky’ anymore. With the trailer for Free Guy seemingly showing him play another character in this realm it really is starting to feel like he has been reduced to a one trick pony – a shame when you know that he is capable of so much more.

I would also be lying if I said there isn’t another major flaw with The Hitman’s Bodyguard’s Wife. It almost seems as if having both the characters of Aristotle Papadopolous and Vladislav Dukhovic (Gary Oldman – The Dark Knight) a bit redundant. Both characters seem pretty similar and while it is fun to watch two legendary actors having fun with their characters it does seem at times throughout the film like we are being inundated with characters that only have limited screen time, so surely melding the two in together would have been a great option.

For the most part though The Hitman’s Wife’s Bodyguard is a fun film to watch. It’s wise cracks actually did make me laugh – which rarely happens in action comedies – and the action sequences were just enough to keep an action junkie happy. Unlike many action-comedies the action here is pretty full-on with head shots galore but what else would you expect from a director that gave us the very under-rated Red Hill. If you were a fan of the first film then chances are you are going to like this one as well. The same wit and action is there to please and this time around Salma Hayek steals the show.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

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Other Subculture The Hitman’s Wife’s Bodyguard Reviews:

Nil.

Trailer:

Summary: A young boy in Hitler’s army finds out his mother is hiding a Jewish girl in their home.

Year: 2019

Australian Cinema Release Date: 26th December 2019

Thailand Cinema Release Date: 21st March 2020

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States, New Zealand, Czech Republic

Director: Taika Waititi

Screenwriter: Taika Waititi, Christine Leunens (novel)

Cast: Alfie Allen (Finkel), Gabriel Andrews (Herr Klum), Brian Caspe (Herr Mueller), Roman Griffin Davis (Jojo), Robert East (Herr Grusch), Luke Brandon Field (Christoph), Sam Haygarth (Hans), Adolf Hitler (himself – archival footage), Scarlett Johansson (Rosie), Thomasin McKenzie (Elsa), Stephen Merchant (Deertz), Billy Rayner (Herr Frosch), Sam Rockwell (Captain Klenzendorf), Taika Waititi (Adolf), Joe Weintraub (Herr Junker), Rebel Wilson (Fraulein Rahm), Archie Yates (Yorki)

Running Time: 108 mins

Classification: M (Australia) TBC (Thailand)

 

 

OUR JOJO RABBIT REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths JoJo Rabbit Review:

Is it okay to ever try to get a laugh out of somebody’s misfortune? How about trying to get a laugh out of one of the worst massacres to have ever happened in human history? It sounds like a brutal question, yet it was a question many were asking after the announcement that filmmaker Taika Waititi was going to be making a comedy that featured himself playing Adolf Hitler while centering on a young Hitler Youth member.

The idea of something funny coming out of such a tragedy is almost unfathomable. To be honest, as someone who has interviewed a Holocaust survivor in person I was one of the people that was questioning whether or not JoJo Rabbit should ever have been made. That was before I saw the film though, afterwards I now find myself championing the film, encouraging others to see it as it delivers a powerful message that is still very relevant to society today.

The reason for my turnaround is that Waititi takes his central character, named JoJo (Roman Griffin Davis – Silent Night), on a journey of learning, discover and intense character building. While early on JoJo is excited about the training he is receiving from his military trainers Captain Klenzendorf (Sam Rockwell – Moon) and Fraulein Rahm (Rebel Wilson – Pitch Perfect) and the adventures that his training will lead to, his values are later put to the test when he discovers that his mother, Rosie (Scarlett Johansson – The Avengers) is hiding a Jewish teenager, named Elsa (Thomasin McKenzie – The King), in a secret room in their house.

There are several things that make JoJo Rabbit such a brilliant and interesting film. First it is told from a point-of-view that we have rarely got to see in cinematic history. Normally when a Nazi is shown in a film that are pure evil, and therefore the events of World War II are rarely shown from their point of view. Here we see these events through the eyes of a young member of the Hitler Youth and it is a different perspective to what many of us would have assumed it would be.

Through the eyes of JoJo we see the hatred that has been forced into him by those around him and of course the propaganda that he sees daily from the man he idolises – Adolf Hitler. But then we also see the utter confusion that he goes through as he meets Elsa. For the first time he is forced to see a Jewish person as a human and he is forced to question whether or not the stories he has been told about them being monsters is true or not. Then there is also the fact that by his own beliefs his mother is now an enemy of the State.

Audiences should be prepared to be put through a range of emotions when they watch JoJo Rabbit as well. Waititi is a smart enough filmmaker to know where the right places are to get a laugh and when it is not acceptable to do so. In fact his timing and pace throughout the film are quite genius and there is one moment in this film I can guarantee where every member of the audience will be in tears.

In his own performance as Hitler Waititi puts in a comical yet balanced performance. The audience needs to remember that this is not Waititi’s view of what Adolf Hitler was like and his slap-stick portrayal is not there to simply garnish laughs – instead it is there to show how the dictator may have been viewed by those that idolised him during the time period.

As a film JoJo Rabbit is also lifted by its fantastic performances. The young cast of Thomasin McKenzie and Roman Griffin Davis put in performances well beyond their years and it is easy to see that the two are destined to become stars. Scarlett Johansson is amazing despite her limited screen time but the true brilliance here comes from Sam Rockewell. This often under-rated actor again puts in a stunning performance as he manages to mix both comedy and drama together sensationally well. It is almost criminal that his performance here didn’t warrant more attention when it came to awards time because as he did in Richard Jewell and The Way, Way Back he once again steals the limelight in every scene he is in.

Any cinema goer has the right to be sceptical over whether or not they think JoJo Rabbit will work as a film. As I mentioned earlier it seems almost inconceivable that any filmmaker could make a comedy about the time of Holocaust and have the film work tastefully – yet somehow Waititi has done just that right here.

As a film JoJo Rabbit takes its audience on a journey alongside its main character. The film does have the power to make you laugh but it also has the power to make you cry. At times the film may not be easy to watch but at the end of the day this is a film so powerful that it deserves to be mentioned alongside great Holocaust films such as Schindler’s List and The Boy In The Striped Pajamas.

 

 

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IMDB Rating: 
Jojo Rabbit (2019) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment JoJo Rabbit Reviews:

Our JoJo Rabbit review that appeared in ‘The Phuket News’ can be read at this link – https://www.thephuketnews.com/down-the-nazi-rabbit-hole-%C2%A0taika-waititi-creates-a-comedy-classic-from-tragedy-75360.php

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