Tagged: Ian Roberts

 

Summary: The owner of a luxurious resort invites a group of people to spend time at the resort and live out their ultimate fantasies with horrific results.

Year: 2020

Australian Cinema Release Date: 13th February 2020

Thailand Cinema Release Date: 2nd July 2020

Australian VOD Release Date: 3rd June 2020

Country: USA

Director: Jeff Wadlow

Screenwriter: Jeff Wadlow, Jillian Jacobs, Christopher Roach

Cast: Jeriya Benn (Lila), Kim Coates (Devil Face), Joshua Diaz (Alejandro), Portia Doubleday (Sloane Maddison), Evan Evagora (Nick Taylor), Parisa Fitz-Henley (Julia), Lucy Hale (Melanie Cole), Ryan Hansen (J.D. Weaver), Robbie Jones (Allen Chambers), Goran D. Kleut (Valet Milton), Andrew Lees (Will), Edmund Lembke-Hogan (Himoff), Josh McConville (Sarge), Charlotte McKinney (Chastity), Michael Pena (Mr. Roarke), Maggie Q (Gwen Olsen), Josh Randall (Valet Chester), Ian Roberts (Dr. Torture), Michael Rooker (Damon), Nick Slater (Greg), Austin Stowell (Patrick Sullivan), Mike Vogel (Lieutenant Sullivan), Mark Weinhandl (Pig Face), Tane Williams-Accra (Fischer), Jimmy O. Yang (Brax Weaver)

Running Time: 109 mins

Classification: M (Australia)

 

 

OUR FANTASY ISLAND REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths’ Fantasy Island Review:

It is always a weird feeling when you like a film that other people seem to dislike. You always feel like you want to defend the film to the hilt, but the same time you can’t help but wonder if you are horribly wrong. The best way to look at it is that you like what you like and as long as you like it it doesn’t really matter what others think.

This whole scenario recently happened with me when it came to Blumhouse Productions re-working of Fantasy Island. Now I am not going to sit here and say that it is film of the year or one of the best horror films ever made, but if you’re looking for a horror film that will entertain you for a couple of hours then this is a film that will not disappoint.

For anyone who watched the original Fantasy Island television series the concept here may be a little strange. Fantasy Island never traditionally had a horror feel to it, but here director Jeff Wadlow (Truth or Dare) and his team give the story a warm welcome into the Blumhouse horror universe.

The film centres around the mystical island run by Mr Roarke (Michael Pena – Ant-Man). It is an island where people go to live out their fantasies and the latest group to have arrived includes jaded youngster Melanie Cole (Lucy Hale – Pretty Little Liars) who dreams about getting revenge on those who bullied her at school and two brothers Patrick Sullivan (Austin Stowell – Whiplash) and Brax Weaver (Jimmy O. Yang – Crazy Rich Asians) who dream of living the life of the rich and famous.

It is here where the film first runs into its major hurdle. See that list of characters above could have almost filled this page. Aside from the ones I have already mentioned there is Maggie Q (Divergent), a wannabe solider who wants to learn about his father and a crazy man who seems to appear out of nowhere but wants to warn everybody about the dangers of the island… and even then that isn’t everyone. Yes the problem here is that there are just way too many characters in this film, at times it even becomes difficult to try and keep track of who is where.

What is a shame is that when the film keeps to its horror roots it is ten time the film it is when it tries to do things a little bit differently. There are scenes that depict Melanie getting revenge on a High School bully that is reminiscent of a Saw movie and it times like that when the film works its best. When Fantasy Island sticks to the basics and remains a simple film about an island where people’s fantasies quickly become nightmares it is a film that captivates its audience and draws it in. However, when the film tries to get too smart and interweave stories while bringing in a convoluted supernatural plotline that I still can’t get my head around it trips itself up and becomes a film that is simply trying too hard.

If the film had kept to the storylines involving Melanie, Patrick and Brax it would have been an absolutely brilliant horror film. Those are the storylines that you end up being drawn to the most and seeing those fantasies become nightmares for those involved is more than enough to have the audience wondering whether Mr. Roarke has a hidden sinister, psychopathic side or if something supernatural is at work. The rest of the story threads that the writers have tried to infuse into the film are just unnecessary overkill.

Also enhancing the film are some of the acting performances at hand. Michael Pena is perfectly cast as Mr. Roarke and for all those naysayers out there who were taking swipes at the film before it was even released no he is not playing a character that is meant to represent Tattoo, the role made famous by Herve Villechaize in the original television series.

Also shining in their roles are Austin Stowell and Jimmy O. Yang who bring their A-Games to a film that you wouldn’t expect it in. As actors they are put through a true wringer of emotions as at times they become the comedic relief for the film but then at other times they are called to do some action sequences and moments of horror as well. It is a well-rounded acting performance that you certainly don’t expect in a film like this.

Last but not least there is the amazing performance of Lucy Hale. Grouped together with her performance in Truth Or Dare Hale is now rightfully considered one of the best up-and-coming actresses in Hollywood. Like some of her co-stars here she is put through a range of emotions of this film and clearly shows why she is only a few steps away from becoming an A-Lister.

Fantasy Island does have some major weaknesses but there are times throughout the film where it is a genuine popcorn horror that has the ability to entertain its audience. While one of the weaker Blumhouse films from recent years it is still certainly a film that is worth a look.

 

 

 

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:

 

 

IMDB Rating:

Fantasy Island (2020) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Fantasy Island Reviews:

You can read our Fantasy Island review which appeared in The Phuket News right here – https://www.thephuketnews.com/fantasy-island-delivering-dreams-and-nightmares-76594.php

 

Trailer:

Teenage Kicks Still1

Shooting wraps today on new Australian feature film TEENAGE KICKS. After five weeks of principal photography in Sydney’s inner-west, south-eastern and northern suburbs the cast and crew have formed a strong bond and are incredibly proud of their achievements on the independently funded film.

On the experience of principal photography, writer/director Craig Boreham says, “The TEENAGE KICKS set has been such a great hub of collaboration that it’s almost sad to see it end. Miles (Szanto) has really thrown his all into bringing Miklós Varga and his world to life, as has the rest of our amazing cast.” He adds, “Working with Bonnie Elliot again, to tell this story, has been fantastic and we have a wonderful collaboration on set. Finishing the shoot is bittersweet, saying goodbye to the cast and the team. But it’s exciting to be moving into the edit period with Adrian Chiarella where we will get to discover our story all over again.”

Producer Annmaree J Bell adds, “It is an amazing journey we are on, I’m feeling very blessed to have the crew and cast we have to bring the film to life.” 

To coincide with the end of principal photography, three first look stills have been released. Featuring principal cast members, lead actor Miles Szanto (The Elephant PrincessLove My Way, Bruno & Earlene Go to Vegas), Daniel Webber (The CombinationK9Sleeping Beauty) and Charlotte Best (Home and AwayPuberty Blues), these first look stills provide an insight into this beautiful and nuanced story. Craig Boreham’s vision for his compelling and evocative coming-of-age drama exploring the minefield of adolescence, burgeoning sexuality and the desire to belong, is beginning to show.

TEENAGE KICKS tells the story of Miklós Varga as he navigates his way through identity, explosive sexuality and guilt, struggling to mature from boy to man. In the final moments of his seventeenth year, Miklós’ world has come crumbling down. His plans to run away and escape the hold of his migrant family have been brutally undone by family disaster. Only Mik knows the events that led to this tragedy and as far as he can see there is only one person to blame: himself.

Mik is suddenly torn between his desire to head north and start a new life with his best friend Dan, and the obligation to his broken family. Can he rise to meet his family’s expectations or is he toxic, destined to bring ruin upon everyone he loves?

Alongside Miles Szanto, Daniel Webber and Charlotte Best, the talented cast of TEENAGE KICKS also includes Shari Sebbans (The SapphiresRedfern Now), Ian Roberts (Little FishSuperman ReturnsUnderbelly: A Tale of Two Cities) and Anni Finsterer (The Boys are BackSleeping BeautyPrime MoverAccidents Happen).

A production from Azure Productions Pty Ltd, TEENAGE KICKS is a collaborative passion project for all involved. TEENAGE KICKS was completely independently financed with the support of private investment and a successful Pozible crowdfunding campaign. LevelK is handling International Sales.

Teenage Kicks Still3Teenage Kicks Still2

Shari Sebbens

Principal photography on new Australian feature film TEENAGE KICKS begins today in and around Sydney. Filming over the next five weeks, Sydney’s Inner West and south-eastern suburbs will provide an impressive backdrop to this nuanced, compelling and evocative coming-of-age drama exploring the minefield of adolescence, burgeoning sexuality and the desire to belong.

Helmed by award winning writer/director Craig Boreham and producer Annmaree J Bell, the film’s talented cast includes Miles Szanto (The Elephant Princess, Love My Way, Bruno & Earlene Go to Vegas) in the lead role, Daniel Webber (The Combination, K9, Sleeping Beauty), Charlotte Best (Home and Away, Puberty Blues), Shari Sebbans (The Sapphires, Redfern Now), Ian Roberts (Little Fish, Superman Returns, Underbelly: A Tale of Two Cities) and Anni Finsterer (The Boys are Back, Sleeping Beauty, Prime Mover, Accidents Happen).

With an original screenplay by Craig Boreham, TEENAGE KICKS tells the story Miklós Varga as he navigates his way through identity, explosive sexuality and guilt, struggling to mature from boy to man.

In the final moments of his seventeenth year, Miklós Varga’s world has come crumbling down. His plans to run away and escape the hold of his migrant family have been brutally undone by family disaster. Only Mik knows the events that led to this tragedy and as far as he can see there is only one person to blame: himself.

Mik is suddenly torn between his desire to head north and start a new life with his best friend Dan, and the obligation to his broken family. Can he fill the shoes of his adored sibling or is he toxic, destined to bring ruin upon everyone he loves?

“We are really exploring that ‘in-between’ phase that we all go through. That cusp moment between teen and adult when the world can turn on its head every single day and you are still trying to find where you fit in the scheme of things,” said writer/director Craig Boreham. “TEENAGE KICKS is an in-your-face, raw look at that time and the issues and struggles these young characters go through when they come crashing toward adulthood. It’s an evocative, sexually charged story that I think most people can relate to,” he added.

TEENAGE KICKS is a feature film adapted from Craig and Annmaree’s multi-award winning short film Drowning. Together Craig and Annmaree’s films have screened in over 500 festivals around the world and have attracted the attention of renowned figures in the Australian film industry. Angie Fielder, producer of Wish You Were Here, said, “Craig Boreham is a fresh, contemporary cinematic voice. He immerses his audience in complete and cinematic worlds, and authentically captures the complexities of teenage lust and sexuality. His characters are melancholic and beautiful, trapped in their insecurities and dying to break free from their angst.”

Collaborating with Craig once again, producer Annmaree J Bell leads an accomplished and talented crew that includes production designer Virginia Mesiti, editor Adrian Chiarella and cinematographer Bonnie Elliott, also Director of Photography for These Final Hours which recently screened at the Cannes Film Festival. Of TEENAGE KICKS Annmaree said, “There was such an amazing response to Drowning that it was the logical next step to adapt it into a feature. We are so passionate about TEENAGE KICKS, I’m thrilled to be working with Craig and our amazing team to bring this incredible film to Australian and international audiences.”

A production from Azure Productions Pty Ltd, TEENAGE KICKS is a collaborative passion project for all involved. The filmmakers are dedicated to integrity with a drive to create, inspire, achieve. TEENAGE KICKS was financed completely independently with the support of private investment and a successful Pozible crowdfunding campaign. LevelK is handling International Sales.

Disgrace

Summary: After having an affair with a student, a Cape Town professor moves to the Eastern Cape, where he gets caught up in a mess of post-apartheid politics.

Year: 2016

Australian Cinema Release Date: 18th June 2009

Australian DVD Release Date: October 2009

Country: Australia, South Africa

Director: Steve Jacobs

Screenwriter: Anna Marie Monticelli, J.M. Coetzee (novel)

Cast: Paula Arundell (Dr. Farodia Rassool), Natalie Becker (Soraya), Terence Bridgett (Sidney), Amy Brittow (Desiree Issacs), Isabella de Viliers (Mrs. Cundell), David Dennis (Mr. Isaacs), Buyami Duma (Pollux), Eriq Ebouaney (Petrus), Antoinette Engel (Melanie Issacs),Antonio Fisher (Sidney),  Jessica Haines (Lucy Lurie), Anne Looby (Rosalind), John Malcovich (Professor David Lurie), Cindy Mkaza(Mrs. Mbeti), Denise Newman (Mrs. Isaacs), Fiona Press (Bev Shaw), Barry Quin (Desmond Swarts), Monroe Reimers (Hakim), Michael Richard (Bill Shaw), David Ritchie (Manas Mathbane), Ian Roberts (Ettinger), Ntobeko Rwanda (Orator), Eve Szapira (Mrs. Cundell), Charles Tertiens (Ryan)

Runtime: 119 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR DISGRACE REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

It’s a major scoop to get an actor with the skills of John Malkovich to star in an Australian funded film, it’s an added bonus that the film turns out as good as ‘Disgrace’ has.

Based on JM Coetzee’s novel ‘Disgrace’ tells the story of Cape Town university lecturer, David Lurie (John Malkovich). who has a sexual relationship with one of his students. David is forced to resign and decides to head to his daughter Lucy’s (Jessica Haines) farm. In the middle of post-apartheid South Africa she is trying to farm-share with a South African native, Petrus (Eriq Ebouaney), a man who David straight away doesn’t trust. Lucy and David’s relationship is strained, can they rely on each other when they really need to.

Australian director, Steve Jacobs does an amazing job on a film that can be confronting and awkward for the audience to the watch. He does an amazing job in protecting the audience from some of the more violent scenes but not losing any of the emotion generated from these events… a lot of directors wouldn’t have the skill to pull such an amazing feat off.

As you would expect Malkovich is at the top of his game and manages to make what most people would consider an ‘unlikeable’ character one where you are actually concerned what happens him. He is well supported by Jessica Haines who plays an extremely difficult role to perfection.

‘Disrace’ may not be a comfortable watch but it is well worth the effort.

Stars(4)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(4)

 

IMDB Rating:  Disgrace (2008) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Disgrace reviews: This Disgrace review first appeared in Buzz Magazine – October 2009.

Trailer: