Tagged: Kodi Smit-McPhee

Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes

Summary: Survivors of the simian plague trigger an all-out war between humanity and Caesar’s growing forces.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 10rd July, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Matt Reeves

Screenwriter: Mark Bomback, Rick Jaffa, Amanda Silver, Pierre Boulle (novel)

Cast: Kirk Acevedo (Carver), Lombardo Boyar (Terry), Jason Clarke (Malcolm), Jon Eyez (Foster), Judy Greer (Cornelia), Toby Kebbell (Koba), Richard King (Stone), Karin Konoval (Maurice), Scott Lang (Luca), Enrique Murciano (Kemp), Douglas Murray (Maurice), Terry Notary (Rocket), Keir O’Donnell (Finney), Gary Oldman (Dreyfus), Kevin Rankin (McVeigh), Lee Ross (Grey), Keri Russell (Ellie), Andy Serkis (Caesar), Larramie Doc Shaw (Ash), Jocko Sims (Werner), Kodi Smit-McPhee (Alexander), Nick Thurston (Blue Eyes)

Runtime: 130 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR DAWN OF THE PLANET OF THE APES REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Adam Ross: You can check out Adam’s Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #87

Stars(4)

 

Greg King: You can check out Greg’s Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes review on www.filmreviews.net.au

Stars(4)

 

Nick Gardener: You can check out Nick’s Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #87

Stars(3.5)

 

David Griffiths:

When you scan over the list of blockbusters due in the cinemas in 2014 Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes is probably one that most would skim over. The first film in this re-booted franchise, Rise of The Planet Of The Apes, was a good film but never seemed to quite gain the traction that its producers obviously hoped that it would. But it only takes watching Dawn of The Planet Of The Apes for a few minutes to see that there is something pretty special about this film.

Set a decade after the events of Rise Of The Planet Of The Apes Caesar (Andy Serkis) leads a group of genetically evolved apes as they have formed a colony of their own on the outskirts of the old San Francisco.

With most humans eradicated by the virus that spread right around the world the Apes now feel completly safe, but they feeling is eroded when a group of humans including Malcolm (Jason Clarke), Ellie (Keri Russell) and Alexander (Kodi Smit-McPhee) venture into the colony in a bid to restore electricity to San Francisco.

Their arrival causes the Apes to wonder about the true intentions of the human leader Dreyfus (Gary Oldman) and makes Koba (Toby Kebbell) decide that it is time to question Caesar’s authority due to his closeness to humans.

Surprisingly early on Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes seems to go against everything that Hollywood wants from a film these days. It’s been long known that American cinema audience have an aversion to subtitles yet here we are with a mega-blockbuster film that opens with discussions between a group of apes which of course have to be portrayed to the audience with only the use of subtitles. It almost seems eerie to be watching these scenes with no humans in sight, but boy as a film lover I loved it.

It almost seems like director Matt Reeves (who has brought as genre classics such as Cloverfield and Let Me In in the past) wants the audience to side with the Apes from Day One, a surprise move but one that is pulled off with absolute brilliance. The fact that it seems that the screenwriters have worked harder on giving characterisation to apes such as Caesar, Koba and Blue Eyes (Nick Thurston) rather than to any of the human characters only seems to push this point any further.

In fact that is the biggest weakness of Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes, the lack of characterisation for most of the human characters. One Ape snarls at one point “humans are all the same, how can you tell them apart?” and sadly that is also the case when it comes to the audience trying to separate the human characters portrayed in the film. Some work has been done giving the character of Malcolm some characterisation, he’s caring and lost his wife amid the mayhem a decade earlier but that is about all the audience is told. His son, Alexander and girlfriend Ellie and treated in the same way by the screenplay while Gary Oldman’s Dreyfus almost becomes your stereotypical clichéd bad guy.

As a film Dawn Of The Planet OF The Apes works best when the relationships between the Apes and Humans is first beginning and then tested. This brings an element of suspense and drama to the film and that point the film remains a ‘thinking persons’ film, but that quickly evaporates when the guns come out and the last quarter of this film becomes dangerously close to becoming just another shoot-at-each-other action film. It even has its own sky-high battle on a building site which almost seems to be mandatory in the modern day action film. To be honest it almost feels like this is a film that has been directed in two parts.

Still the early parts of this film is what makes the film so memorable and it also becomes a visual delight for any film fan that likes good CGI. For the most part Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes is a visual delight, the Apes themselves look eerily realistic, as does their colony, although it does seem like some dodgy last minute CGI work was done especially in some scenes that involve the Apes swinging on the remains of the Golden Gate Bridge. Still that is a very little gripe to have when you consider how good other parts of this look – it seems to even go a step further than anything even Peter Jackson has even done.

This is a film where CGI is the big winner. Often CGI generated characters are hard for the audience to develop feelings for, but here it seems that the audience ends up loving Caesar and co but struggling to identify with some dangerously underwritten human characters. Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes does have some weak moments but for the most part it keeps afloat the tradition of most of 2014’s blockbusters being fairly decent films.

Stars(4)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(4)

 

IMDB Rating:  Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (2014) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Reviews of ‘Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes′: For our full Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #87. You can also read Dave Griffiths’ Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show

In Episode #46 of ‘The Good The Bad Ugly Film Show’ the boys took a look at who they thought were the best ever child actors, let’s have a look at their selections.

GREG KING’S LIST

Jonathan Taylor Thomas

  • Elizabeth Taylor
  • Mickey Rooney
  • Judy Garland
  • Kurt Russell
  • Jodie Foster
  • Brooke Shields
  • Anna Paquin
  • Macaulay Culkin
  • Frankie Muniz
  • Dakota Fanning
  • Chloe Grace Moretz
  • Roddy McDowall
  • Brady Bunch Cast (Eve Plumb)
  • Christina Ricci
  • Natalie Portman
  • Haley Joel Osment
  • Ron Howard
  • Tatum O’Neil
  • Nicholas Hoult
  • Christian Bale
  • Drew Barrymore
  • Ben Oxenbould
  • Joseph Gordon-Levitt
  • Jonathan Taylor Thomas
  • The Olson Twins
  • Devon Sawa
  • Kodi Smit-McPhee
  • Angourie Rice
  • Garry Pankhurst
  • Henry Thomas
  • Jake Lloyd
  • Freddie Highmore
  • Leonardo DiCpario

 

ADAM ROSS’ LIST

Photographed by John Tass-Parker

  • Natalie Portman
  • Jodie Foster
  • Haley Joel Osment
  • Kirsten Dunst
  • Linda Blair
  • Kodi Smit-McPhee
  • Josh Peck
  • Rufus Read
  • Jacob Kogan
  • Isabelle Fuhrman
  • Eloise Laurence
  • Pierce Gagnon
  • Asa Butterfield

 

DAVID GRIFFITHS’ LIST

Hanna Mangan lawrence

  • Kirsten Dunst
  • Drew Barrymore
  • Sebastian Gregory
  • Hannah Mangan-Lawrence
  • Bailee Madison
  • Joseph Gordon-Levitt
  • Mila Kunis
  • Christian Bale
  • Abigail Breslin
  • Rachel Miner
  • Bijou Phillips
  • Kristen Stewart
  • Joshua Jackson
  • Daniel Radcliffe
  • Rupert Grint
  • Emma Watson
  • Tom Felton
  • Tom Holland
  • Tom Russell
  • Kodi Smit-McPhee
  • James McKenna
  • Michelle Williams
  • Robert Capron
  • Matthew Krok
  • Leonardo DiCaprio
  • WORST LIST – Macaulay Culkin
  • WORST LIST – Jaden Smith

 

NICK GARDENER’S LIST

Michelle Williams

  • Different Strokes Cast
  • Macuarly Culkin
  • Kirsten Dunst
  • Jonathan Lipnicki
  • Michelle Williams
  • Justin Timberlake
  • Danica McKellar
  • Jack Wilde
  • David Faustino
  • Christina Ricci
  • Henry Stevens
  • Jaleel White

 

AFCA

The nominations for the 2013 AFCA Awards are:

BEST FILM: Hail, Lore, The King Is Dead, The Sapphires, Wish You Were Here

BEST DIRECTOR: Wayne Blair (The Sapphires), Amiel Courtin-Wilson (Hail), Kieran Darcy-Smith (Wish You Were Here), Ralph de Heer (The King Is Dead), Cate Shortland (Lore)

BEST ACTOR: Joel Edgerton (Wish You Were Here), Matthew Goode (Burning Man), Daniel P Jones (Hail), Ewen Leslie (Dead Europe), Chris O’Dowd (The Sapphires)

BEST ACTRESS: Toni Collette (Mental), Deborah Mailman (The Sapphires), Felicity Price (Wish You Were Here), Saskia Rosendahl (Lore), Sarah Snook (Not Suitable For Children)

BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE: Marton Csokas (Dead Europe), Liev Schrieber (Mental), Kodi Smit-McPhee (Dead Europe), Antony Starr (Wish You Were Here), Garry Waddell (The King Is Dead)

BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE: Essie Davis (Burning Man), Rebecca Gibney (Mental), Deborah Mailmen (Mental), Jessica Mauboy (The Sapphires), Bojana Novakovic (Burning Man)

BEST SCREENPALY: Amiel Courtin-Wilson (Hail), Cate Shortland & Robin Mukherjee (Lore), Rolf de Heer (The King Is Dead), Keith Thompson & Tony Briggs (The Sapphires), Kieran Darcy-Smith & Felicity Price (Wish You Were Here)

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY: Adam Arkapaw (Lore), Germain McMicking (Hail), Germain McMicking (Dead Europe), Jules O’Loughlin (Wish You Were Here), Garry Phillips (Burning Man), Warwick Thornton (The Sapphires)

BEST EDITING: Jason Ballantine (Wish You Were Here), Martin Connor (Burning Man), Dany Cooper (The Sapphires), Veronika Jenet (Lore), Peter Sciberras (Hail)

BEST MUSIC SCORE: Steve Benwell (Hail), Antony Partos (33 Postcards), Max Richter (Lore), Cezary Skubiszewski (The Sapphires), Graham Tardif (The King Is Dead)

BEST OVERALL PRODUCTION DESIGN: Zohie Castalleno (Hail), Melinda Doring (The Sapphires), Silke Fischer (Lore), Steven Jones-Evans (Burning Man), Graham Walker (Mental)

BEST INTERNATIONAL FILM (FOREIGN LANGUAGE): A Separation, Holy Motors, Le Havre, The Kid With A Bike, The Raid

BEST INTERNATIONAL FILM (ENGLISH LANGUAGE): Argo, Beasts Of The Southern Wild, Deep Blue Sea, Hugo, Moonrise Kingdom

BEST DOCUMENTARY: All The Way Through Evening, I Am 11, Life In Movement, Paul Kelly: Stories Of Me, Searching For Sugarman

ParaNorman

Summary: In ParaNorman, a small town comes under siege by zombies. Who can it call? Only misunderstood local boy Norman , who is able to speak with the dead. In addition to the zombies, he’ll have to take on ghosts, witches and, worst of all, moronic grown-ups, to save his town from a centuries-old curse. But this young ghoul whisperer may find his paranormal activities pushed to their otherworldly limits.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 10th January, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Chris Butler, Sam Fell

Screenwriter: Chris Butler

Cast: Casey Affleck (Mitch(voice)), Tucker Albrizzi (Neil(voice)), Tempestt Bledsoe (Sheriff Hooper (voice)), Alex Borstein (Mrs. Henscher (voice)), Jodelle Ferland (Aggie (voice)), Jeff Garlin (Perry Babcock (voice)), John Goodman (Mr. Prenderghast (voice)), Bernard Hill (The Judge (voice)), Bridget Hoffman (Crystal (voice)), Anna Kendrick (Courtenay Babcock (voice)), Leslie Mann (Sandra Babcock (voice)), Christopher Mintz-Plasse (Alvin(voice)), Hannah Noyes (Salma (voice)),  Kodi Smit-McPhee (Norman Babcock (voice)), Elaine Stritch (Grandma (voice))

Runtime: 93 mins

Classification:PG

Dave Griffiths’s ‘ParaNorman’ Review: 

There have been some pretty good animated ‘horror’ films surface this year with the adequate ‘Hotel Transylvania’ and of course the brilliant ‘Frankenweenie’. Now comes ‘ParaNorman’ a lovely to look at animated film with a story that is guaranteed to captivate people of all ages.

‘ParaNorman’s’ plot centers around Norman (voiced by Kodi Smit-McPhee – ‘Dead Europe’, ‘Let Me In’) a young loner who feels that is Mum, Sandra (Leslie Mann – ‘This Is 40’, ‘The Change-Up’), and father, Perry (Jeff Garlin – ‘Sin Bin’, ‘Safety Not Guaranteed’), don’t understand him and that his sister, Courtney (Anna Kendrick – ‘Pitch Perfect’, ‘End Of Watch’) hates him for being a freak. In fact Norman is in fact easy pickings for bullies like Alvin (Christopher Mintz-Plasse – ‘Movie 43’, ‘Pitch Perfect’) because he appears to be a weirdo that talks to himself, but instead Norman sees the dead, like his Grandmother (Elaine Stritch – Romance & Cigarettes, TV’S 30 Rock), and can have conversations with them.

To Norman it’s always just been an annoying curse his life but when his banished uncle, Mr. Prederghast (John Goodman – ‘Trouble With The Curve’, ‘Argo’) warns him that upon his death he will be the only one that will be able to prevent the evil witch Aggie’s (Jodelle Ferland – ‘Midnight Rider’, ‘Home Alone: The Holiday Heist) curse from coming to life and wreaking havoc on his town he can’t help but wonder what trouble his gift is going to get him into.

When the curse does begin to work Norman, his new best friend Neil (Tucker Albrizzi – TV’S ‘Good Luck Charlie’ & TV’S ‘Lab Rats’), Courtney and high school jock Mitch (Casey Affleck – ‘Ain’t Them Bodies Saints’, ‘Tower Heist’) soon have their hands full with a group of zombies.

The key to ‘ParaNorman’ working so well is because the directors Chris Butler (newcomer) and Sam Fell (‘The Tale Of Despereaux’, ‘Flushed Away’) have made it look absolutely amazing by using the modern version of stop animation but also embracing a look that matches so many of the old style horror movies that it pays tribute to.

Likewise the story works well and it will appeal to an audience of all ages, although parents of young children should be warned that some of the more supernatural scenes are likely to scare the younger audience members. In some ways ‘ParaNorman’ is an animated films for adults and you can’t really complain about that.

The voice cast also do a sensational job. Aussie Kodi Smit-McPhee does well putting on an American accent and falls into character well although the standout is clearly John Goodman who takes his role of Mr. Prenderghast and really runs with it.

‘ParaNorman’ is the kind of film that will be loved by anyone that enjoys a good animated film or has an interest in old school horror film.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘ParaNorman′: Check Episode #15 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘ParaNorman’. Dave’s other review of ‘ParaNorman’ can be found on the Helium Entertainment Channel

Rating: 4/5

IMDB Rating:ParaNorman (2012) on IMDb

Summary: Following the death of his father in suburban Sydney, Isaac (Ewan Leslie) takes the ashes back to his father’s birthplace in Greece where he finds himself on the trail of a buried family secret.

At first he dismisses the revelation as superstitious nonsense, but over the course of his travels – from Greece to Paris to Budapest – Isaac is forced to confront the anti-Semitism of the past, the embedded bigotry in the bones of Europe and the nature of inherited guilt. It is on this fateful trip that Isaac will learn the truth of his family’s migration to Australia, their refusal to ever return to Greece, and the burden he continues to bear as a consequence of acts committed years before his birth.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 15th November 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Australia

Director: Tony Krawitz

Screenwriter: Louise Fox, Christos Tsiolkas (novel)

Cast: Coral Amiga (Yvette), Jean-Francois Balmer (Gerry), Ania Bukstein (Amina), Elena Carapetis (Sophie), Marton Csokas (Nico), Cory Derrick (B/D Joseph), Eugenia Fragos (Reveka), Melita Jurisic (Maria), Alex Lanipekun (Red), Francois Lebrun (Leah), Ewen Leslie (Isaac), Ilianna Mavronmmati (Eleni), Kenneth Moraleda (Heng), Kodi Smit-McPhee (Josef), Yigal Naor (Syd), Thanos Samaras (Andreas), Danae Skiadi (Giulia), Olivia Stambouliah (Phoebe), William Zappa (Vassily)

Runtime: 84 mins

Classification: MA15+

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Dead Europe’ Review: Sometimes experimental cinema in Australia works. Directors such as Jim Stamatakos and Bill Mousoulis have created some wonderful films in the genre over the years, but then along came Hail, a film that showed only too well what happens when experimental cinema goes wrong. Well fans of Aussie experimental cinema rejoice because the genre is again back on track with Dead Europe a great little film that has the audience’s attention from start to finish.

Based on a novel by Christos Tsiolkas it tells the story of Isaac (Ewen Leslie – Suspended, TV’S Devil’s Dust) a Greek Australian who despite the warnings of his mother decides to visit Europe for the first time after the death of his father, Vassily (William Zappa – Redd Inc., TV’S Devil’s Dust).

Once in Greece Isaac travels with his cousin Giulia (Danae Skiadi – The Boy And The Tree, TV’S 4) and her friend, Andreas (Thanos Samaras – Tied Red Thread, Homeland). Everywhere they go they hear about the supposed curse that is supposedly on Isaac’s family because of Vassily. Soon Isaac finds himself unable to contact his brother Nico (Marton Csokas – Dream House, Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter) and realizes he is being haunted by Josef (Kodi Smit-McPhee – ParaNorman, Let Me In).

Dead Europe isn’t a film for everybody. Director Tony Krawitz (The Tall Man, TV’S All Saints) takes the film into some pretty dark areas. Isaac’s homosexuality is seen in graphic detail, as is a threesome between himself, Guilia and Andreas, but none of this is done for shock value and it really does move the storyline along.

What works wonderfully well with Dead Europe is the fact that the audience is given no insight into what is actually happening, and as a result you are just as in the dark as Isaac is. You find yourself desparately trying to work out whether or not the ‘curse’ is real and you will really rack your brain to try and figure out what the whole storyline around Josef is all about. What makes Dead Europe an even better watch is that Tony Krawitz also uses some creative shots and sequences to get the story up onto the screen.

Acting wise the entire cast are standouts. Ewen Leslie and Marton Csokas will be warranting some award nominations come award seasons while they are well supported by Danae Skiadi who really announces herself as an actor with a big future ahead of her. The other big surprise is Kodi Smit-McPhee, films such as Let Me In proved just how good this young actor could be, but with Dead Europe you feel that he takes another massive step forward in his career.

Dead Europe will have a few people scratching their heads but it is certainly well worth a look.

Other Dead Europe Reviews By Subculture Writers:http://www.helium.com/items/2384828-movie-reviews-dead-europe-2012

Rating: 3.5/5 Stars

IMDB Rating: Dead Europe (2012) on IMDb