Tagged: Jason Flemyng

FeatureJason Flemying

Filming commenced this week on the action-packed vampire thriller EAT LOCAL, the directorial debut of renowned screen star Jason Flemyng (X-Men: First Class,Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels).

Charlie Cox (Netflix’s Daredevil, The Theory of Everything), Mackenzie Crook (Pirates of the Caribbean series, Game of Thrones), Dexter Fletcher (Eddie the Eagle), Freema Agyeman (Doctor Who) and Eve Myles (Doctor Who, Torchwood) head up an incredible all-star cast, while Flemyng directs a razor-sharp script written by BAFTA-nominee Danny King (Wild Bill).

EAT LOCAL revolves around unwitting Essex boy Sebastian, whose promise of a night of passion with ravishing cougar Vanessa quickly turns into a fight for survival after she introduces him to some of her friends – a coven of hungry vampires – at a remote farmhouse. As if Sebastian’s night couldn’t get any worse, a heavily armed band of mercenary vampire hunters led by the steadfast Captain Bingham crashes the party – and much like the vampires, they’re out for blood.

The phenomenal cast also includes Ruth Jones (Gavin & Stacey), Annette Crosbie (Into the Woods) and Vincent Regan (Lockout, 300), and introduces Billy Cook as Sebastian.

Rod Smith of Evolution Pictures is producing, along with Jonathan Sothcott and Neil Jones of Hereford Films.

Jason Flemyng commented, ‘Eat Local has been 10 years in the making and has been through so many different budgets and guises but me and Danny King have worked together and finally we’re here. We’re 3 days in to shooting and 50% of what we’re doing is better than I could have imagined and 50% is as good as I could have hoped. Everyone is working really hard with budgets they haven’t seen for 20 years and the actors are working for beer & lunch money. But we’re doing it, we’ve pulled it together, and I’m so thrilled’

Rod Smith said, ‘This project has been on my radar for some time and I was delighted that, through Evolution Pictures, we were able to secure Jason Flemyng to make his directorial debut with Danny King’s brilliant script. The cast and crew are all amazing – everyone involved knows that this film will be something very special and an exceptional addition to the genre. I’m very proud to have Eat Local as Evolution Pictures’ biggest film to date, and look forward to everyone being blown away by it!’

Jonathan Sothcott noted, ‘Eat Local is without a doubt the best film I’ve been involved with. Danny King has written an absolutely fantastic, smart script and Flemyng is the best prepared director I’ve ever worked with; he’s an absolute natural. The cast speaks for itself and I can’t wait for people to see it.’

Principal photography will wrap in February after a four-week shoot in Hertfordshire.

The film is being sold at the forthcoming European Film Market in Berlin by GFM Films’ newly formed sales arm GFM Evolution. GFM’s Fred Hedman said, ‘GFM Evolution has been formed to focus on commercially attractive genre pictures. With Gangland and We Still Steal the Old Way in the can, Eat Local begins our new year with bite!’

Great Expectations
Summary: Adapted from the classic Charles Dickens novel by Dave Nicholls (One Day) and directed by Mike Newell (Four Weddings and a Funeral) is Great Expectations. The story of a humble orphan, Pip (Jeremy Irvine, War Horse), who suddenly becomes a gentleman with the help of an unknown benefactor.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 7th March, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA/UK

Director: Mike Newell

Screenwriter: David Nicholls, Charles Dickens (book)

Cast: Matt Abercromby (Finch), Olly Alexander (Herbert Pocket), Helena Barlow (Young Estella), Ewen Bremner (Wemmick), Nellie Burroughes (Mrs. Compeyson), Charlie Callaghan (Young Herbert Pocket), Helena Bonham Carter (Miss Havisham), Bebe Cave (Young Biddy), Jessie Cave (Biddy), Robbie Coltrane (Mr. Jaggers), William Ellis (Compeyson), Ralph Fiennes (Magwitch), Jason Flemyng (Joe Gargery), Tim Freeman (Mr. Wopsle), Holliday Grainger (Estella), Sally Hawkins (Mrs. Joe), Jeremy Irvine (Pip), Toby Irvine (Young Pip), Richard James (Cousin Raymond), Joe Jameson (Startop), Ben Lloyd-Hughes (Bentley Drummle), Kate Lock (Camilla Pocket), Tom Machell (Finch), Tamzin Outhwaite (Molly), Sophie Rundle (Clara), David Walliams (Uncle Pumblechook), Daniel Weyman (Arthur Havisham), Charles L. Whitworth (Mrs. Raymond)

Runtime: 129 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Great Expectations’ Review: 

It’s funny how many films get made that it seems don’t really need to have been made. Take a look at the new adaption of ‘Great Expectations’, why did director Mike Newell (‘Prince Of Persia: The Sands Of Time’, ‘Love In The Time Of Cholera’) really have to make another modern version. After all the original 1946 version was a cinematic masterpiece and there has already been a modern remake, one that starred Ethan Hawke and Gwenyth Paltrow and surfaced in 1998.

Still Newell got the funding to once again bring Charles Dickens’ work to the big screen and while he doesn’t exactly do anything new with his version if you have never seen the story before you will still marvel at its twists and turns.

For those who haven’t seen the previous adaptations of Charles Dickens classic novel, the film is about a young boy named Pip (Toby Irvine – newcomer/Jeremy Irvine – ‘Now Is Good’, ‘War Horse) who out of the kindness of his heart one day helps an escaped convict called Magwitch (Ralph Fiennes – ‘Skyfall’, ‘Wrath Of The Titans’). While Pip tries to keep the news from his guardian, Joe (Jason Flemyng – ‘Black Mirror’, ‘I Give It A Year’) the news does eventually leak out and Magwitch is returned to prison.

Pip’s life then dramatically changes when he is the young boy that is selected by the extremely wealthy (but also very strange) Miss Havisham (Helena Bonham Carter – ‘Les Miserables’, ‘Dark Shadows’) to play with Estella (Helena Barlow – ‘Horrid Henry: The Movie’, ‘Harry Potter & The Deathly Hallows Part 2’/Holliday Grainger – ‘Anna Karenina’, ‘Bel Ami’) while she watches. Pip quickly develops a crush on Estella and is heart broken when he is sent away from the mansion he comes to love.

When Pip is older his life again changes when a lawyer, Mr Jaggers (Robbie Coltrane – ‘Brave’, TV’S ‘The Comic Strip Presents…’) turns up and tells Pip that he has been left a decent sum of people. Pip chooses to leave Joe and moves to London where he joins the elite, crosses paths with Estella again  all while uncovering more and more secrets every single day.

Maybe the fact that Newell doesn’t do anything to change the story at all is a good thing, after all remember the mess of the modern version of ‘Jane Eyre’ that surfaced recently, proof that modern remakes can really wreck even a classic tale. While Newell’s version of ‘Great Expectations’ does nothing new at least it once again proves the skills that Dickens had as a writer.

One thing that does work with this film is the acting. While Holliday Grainger and Jeremy Irvine live up to their ‘exciting new talent’ tags the usual suspects like Robbie Coltrane and Ralph Fiennes again deliver faultless performances. However the star here is Helena Bonham Carter who really makes the character of Miss Havisham warped and mysterious… this is clearly one of Carter’s best performances to date.

If you’ve seen the other versions of ‘Great Expectations’ than you may want to save your money and sit this one out, but if you’re a newbie to the story then this is a great place to start.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Great Expectations′: Check Episode #23 (available 8th March) of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Great Expectations’. Please also check Dave Griffiths’s review of ‘Great Expectations’ that is available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Rating: 3/5

IMDB Rating:Great Expectations (2012) on IMDb

The Good The Bad The Ugly

This week Dave, Nick, Adam and Greg take a look at new release films Cloud Atlas, Side Effects, I Give It A Year, Save Your Legs!, The Imposter and The Paperboy. Plus they took an in depth look at all The Oscars wrap-up and have Part 1 of their look at the 2013 Alliance French Film Festival. This episode also features interview with Zac Efron, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Jude Law, Scott Burns, Channing Tatum, Rooney Mara, Minnie Driver, Dan Mazer, Rose Byrne, Rafe Spall, Anna Faris, Simon Baker, Stephen Merchant, Jason Flemying, Tom Hanks, Halle Berry, Jim Sturgess, James D’Arcy, Hugh Grant, Susan Sarandon, Ben Whishaw, Jim Broadbent, Keith David, Lana Wachowski and the cast of Housos vs Authority.

Also make sure you listen for your chance to win a copy of ‘Storm Surfers 3D’ on Blu-Ray thanks to Madman Entertainment.

I Give It A Year Helium Review

Summary: Starting where other romantic comedies finish, I GIVE IT A YEAR charts the trials and tribulations of a rather mismatched couple navigating their first year of marriage.

Since meeting, ambitious high-flyer Nat (Rose Byrne) and struggling novelist Josh (Rafe Spall) have been deliriously happy despite their differences. Josh is a thinker, Nat’s a doer… but the spark between them is undeniable. Their wedding is a dream come true, but family and friends think they won’t make it. When Josh’s ex-girlfriend Chloe (Anna Faris) and Nat’s handsome new client Guy (Simon Baker) come into the picture, the situation gets a little more complicated. Neither wants to be the first to give up, but will they make it?

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 28th February, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: UK

Director: Dan Mazer

Screenwriter: Dan Mazer

Cast: Jane Asher (Diana), Simon Baker (Guy), Rose Byrne (Nat), Olivia Colman (Counsellor), Minnie Driver (Naomi), Anna Faris (Chloe), Jason Flemying (Hugh), Kerry Howard (Clare), Martin John King (Roger), Stephen Merchant (Danny), Joseph Millson (Charlie), Rafe Spall (Josh)

Runtime: 102 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘I Give It A Year’ Review: 

For some of the reason it is always the British that rise to the task of delivering a decent comedy, and this time that decent comedy is ‘I Give It A Year’… a film that may be an anti-romance film but is still a cut above most of the romantic comedies that make it to the big screen.

The film begins with the wedding of Nat (Rose Byrne – The Place Beyond The Pines, TV’S Damages) and Josh (Rafe Spall – Life Of Pi, Earthbound), a marriage that almost seems doomed from the start as the priest chokes at an important time and the reception is kind of ruined by the best man, Dan (Stephen Merchant – Movie 43, Hall Pass) whose jokes go down like a lead balloon.

Flash-forward to nine months down the track and now Nat and Josh’s marriage has already hit the skids. The pair decides to try marriage counselling, which almost seems like a mistake seeing they end up being counselled by a counsellor (Olivia Colman – Hyde Park On Hudson, TV’S Accused) so inept at her job she does more damage than good. Their marriage is then further tested when Nat’s new advertising client turns out to be charming American, Guy (Simon Baker – Margin Call, TV’S The Mentalist) while Josh seems to spend more and more time with his ex-girlfriend Chloe (Anna Faris – Movie 43, The Dictator).

Director/screenwriter Dan Mazer (TV’S Dog Bites Man, TV’S Da Ali G Show) does do a lot to make sure ‘I Give It A Year Works’, some of the jokes work a treat but there is still a massive flaw in this film. Like so many comedy films seem to do these days the actors have been directed to pause after they deliver a funny line, works well when the audience is laughing, but too many times in this film that pause is filled with sound of crickets and tumble weeds as the joke goes down like a lead balloon.

Still Mazer does deserve some credit for the work that he has done with ‘I Give It A Year’. Not many people like to ‘break the mould’ when making a romantic comedy and to his credit Mazer doesn’t just break it he shatters it. And while this may be considered an anti-romantic comedy it certainly won’t leave those looking for a bit of a romance in their films out in the cold… it has romance it just goes about telling the story a little differently.

‘I Give It A Year’ sees Rose Byrne once again show that she has a flair for comedy, while Rafe Spall may have been a surprising pick as a leading man but to his credit he does a great job with the material that he is given to work with. Anna Faris also shows that when given a good script she can deliver although most of the comedy points here have to go to Stephan Merchant who steals many of the scenes that he is in.

This may not be the greatest comedy of all time, but it will provide some laughs and is a lot better than many of the other trashy comedies that have surfaced recently.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘I Give It A Year′: Check Episode #22 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘I Give It A Year’. Dave Griffiths also has another review of ‘I Give It A Year’ available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Rating: 3/5

IMDB Rating:

X-Men First Class

Summary: Before Charles Xavier and Erik Lensherr took the names Professor X and Magneto, they were two young men discovering their powers for the first time. Before they were archenemies, they were closest of friends, working together, with other mutants (some familiar, some new), to stop the greatest threat the world has ever known. In the process, a rift between them opened, which began the eternal war between Magneto’s Brotherhood and Professor X’s X-Men.

Year: 2011

Australian Cinema Release Date: 2nd June, 2011

Australian DVD Release Date: 19th October, 2011

Country: USA

Director: Matthew Vaughn

Screenwriter: Ashley Miller, Zack Stentz, Jane Goldman, Matthew Vaughn, Sheldon Turner (story), Bryan Singer (story)

Cast: Kevin Bacon (Sebastian Shaw), Laurence Belcher (Charles Xavier (12 years old), Rose Byrne (Moira MAcTaggert), Gregory Cox (Dr. Leigh), Matt Craven (CIA Director McCone), Don Creech (William Stryker), Michael Fassbender (Erik Lehnsherr/Magneto), Beth Goddard (Mrs. Xavier), Jason Flemyng (Azazel), Edi Gathegi (Armando Munoz/Darwin), Alex Gonzalez (Janos Questid/Riptide), Demetri Goritsas (Levene), Nicholas Hoult (Hank McCoy/Beast), Hugh Jackman (Logan/Wolverine), Corey Johnson (Chief Warden), Caleb Landry Jones (Sean Cassidy/Banshee), January Jones (Emma Frost), Zoe Kravitz (Angel Salvadore), Jennifer Lawrence (Raven/Mystique), Morgan Lily (Young Raven (10 yrs), Eva Magyor (Edie Lensherr), James McAvoy (Charles Xavier), Bill Milner (Young Erik), Glenn Morshower (Colonel Hendry), Greg Nikoloff (Mr. Lensherr), Rebecca Romijn (Mystque – older), Lucas Till (Alex Summers/Havok)

Runtime: 132 mins

Classification:M

OUR REVIEWS/RATINGS OF ‘X-MEN: FIRST CLASS’:

David Griffiths: Stars(4)

The X-Men series of films seem to get off to a brilliant start but then fell in a heap with the seriously ordinary X-Men: The Final Stand and X-Men Origins: Wolverine. However, with director, Matthew Vaughn at the helm X-Men: First Class puts this series back on track with a prequel that will not only excite fans of the series (and the comics) but also stun those who have never heard of X-Men.

This time around we learn about the beginnings of several X-Men with the main focus being on Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) and Erik Lehnsherr (Michael Fassbender) who fans of the series will know later on becomes Xavier’s nemesis, Magneto. The film shows as Xavier first meets Raven (Jennifer Lawrence) (who becomes Mystique) and realises that he isn’t the only mutant in the world. At the same time Erik is suffering at the hands of the Nazis. The two men are on two very different paths in life but meet when Xavier is recruited by the CIA to help prevent Russia and America heading into a war that is the brainchild of mutant, Sebastian Shaw (Kevin Bacon). Xavier tries to recruit Erik into his ‘first mutant class’ but Erik’s hate always threatens to bring everything crashing down.

Vaughn actually does an amazing job with this film, the way he mixes drama and action together ends up making X-Men: First Class the finest film in this series, and also one of the films of the year. As he proved with Kick-Ass Vaughn knows how to bring a comic book to life and this time around he has certainly outdone himself. The amount of work he puts into characterization means you are on Xavier’s side from the get-go, while Vaughn brings a natural feel to the film that makes you feel that you are watching a historically correct film rather than a piece of fiction. To his credit he doesn’t over-do the action scenes, and even they seem perfectly natural.

Also making this film a must see is some spectacular performances by James McAvoy and Jennifer Lawrence. McAvoy may have been worried about the fact that he may ruin a character made famous by the legendary Patrick Stewart, but he need not have worried. McAvoy is sensational in the role and his dramatic presence only enhances the film. Jennifer Lawrence also puts in a fine performance and she continues to show why everyone was blown away with her performance in Winter’s Bone. Also announcing himself is Nicholas Hault who almost steals every scene he is in.

Whether you are a fan of the X-Men series or not you will enjoy X-Men: First Class. This is a sensational film that only goes to show that Michael Vaughn is one of the best directors of our time… he is yet to make a bad film. The right mix of drama and action makes X-Men: First Class a film that shouldn’t be missed.

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(4)

IMDB Rating: X-Men: First Class (2011) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘X-Men: First Class′: This review of ‘X-Men: First Class’ by David Griffiths originally appeared in Buzz Magazine.

There are many X-Men fans out there who were extremely nervous when they heard that the X-Men series of films was being rebooted. To be honest they had every right to be feeling that way as the last film in the series, the ill-fated Final Stand left a lot to be desired… others would argue that X-Men Origins: Wolverine was just a bad. Even worse was the news that Patrick Stewart wouldn’t be on board as this film takes a trup back in time and sets out to explain the characters of Charles Xavier and Magneto. Well, the good news is the film works far beyond expectation.

As promised the film goes back to the start and shows Charles Xavier (James McAvoy – Gnomeo & Juliet, The Conspirator) first meeting another mutant in the form of Raven/Mystique (Jennifer Lawrence – The Beaver, Like Crazy), as well as showing Erik Lehnsherr/Magneto’s (Michael Fassbender – Jane Eyre, Jonah Hex) cruel treatment at the hands of the Nazis. When Xavier is recruited by CIA agent, Moira McTaggert (Rose Byrne – Bridesmaids, Insidious) they decide to help put together a ‘mutant section’ when they learn that Sebastian Shaw (Kevin Bacon – Elephant White, Bored To Death) is trying to force war between Russia and America. This sees Xavier recruit mutants from right across the country and try desperately to get Erik to work with them.

X-Men: First Class not only manages to re-boot this series but also brings so class to it. Once again director, Matthew Vaughn (Kick-Ass, Stardust) manages to do a fine job making a comic-book film remain interesting while making the film open to even those that haven’t read the comic. He almost makes this film seem like two films. The characterization around Charles and Erik is normally reserved for serious historical movies while the action sequences seem natural and never forced. He didn’t even go over the top with Hugh Jackman’s (X-Men Origins: Wolverine, Australia) cameo… it was short and sweet.

The real stars of this film though are James McAvoy and Jennifer Lawrence. McAvoy puts in a brilliant performance and he certainly doesn’t have to worry about fans comparing him to Patrick Stewart. His portrayal of Xavier is spot on and once again the producers were correct in hiring a dramatic actor despite the ‘action-film’ tag associated with the film. He is also well supported by Jennifer Lawrence who hasn’t put a foot wrong since Winter’s Bone. X-Men: First Class also announces the arrival of Nicholas Hault (Clash Of The Titans, A Single Man) who doesn’t put a foot wrong in any of his scenes.

Michael Vaughn keeps his perfect record intact; he is yet to make a bad film, with X-Men: First Class a terrific film that mixes drama and action perfectly. This is a standout in the X-Men series and hopefully they continue to make more with this team at the helm.

 Trailer: