Tagged: Daniel Dorr

Summary: Once again it is up to Bill and Ted to save the world – this time they have to travel through time and work out how they wrote the perfect song in the future. With a task so big though this time they may need their daughters to help them.

Year: 2020

Cinema Release Dates: 28th August 2020 (Australia), 16th September 2020 (UK), 28th August 2020 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: 28th August 2020 (Australia), 28th August 2020 (USA)

Country: Bahamas, USA

Director: Dean Parisot

Screenwriter: Chris Matheson, Ed Solomon

Cast: Brigette Nicole Andrews (Cleopatra), Linda Ayliff (Amelia Earhart), Jared Bankins (Jesus/Young Ted), Diana Barnes (Frida), Jillian Bell (Dr. Taylor Wood), Beck Bennett (Deacon), Artis Burney (Buddha), George Carlin (Rufus Hologram), Anthony Carrigan (Dennis Caleb McCoy), Georgia Cohran (Harriet Tubman), Jeremiah Craft (Louis Armstrong), Daniel Dorr (Mozart), Doug Gagnon (Bartholomew), Sharon Gee (Ling Lun),Kallie Glidewell (Flapper), Mickey Gooch Jnr. (Clete), Dave Grohl (himself), William E. Harris (George Washington), Erinn Hayes (Elizabeth), Miles Hendler (Judas), Kid Cudi (himself), Hal Landon Jnr. (Chief Logan), Xavier Leblanc (Phaoroh), Reece Loustalot (Babe Ruth), Jeff Pagano (Noelle Redding), Brigette Lundy-Paine (Billie), Jayma Mays (Joanna), Piotr Michael (Rufus (voice)), Patty Anne Miller (Grom), Kharismisa Morris (Josephine Baker), Keanu Reeves (Ted), Eliana Ruiz (Indira Gandhi), William Sadler (Death), Kristen Schaal (Kelly), Billy Slaughter (Young Bill), DaZMann Still (Jimi Hendrix), Amy Stoch (Missy), Kimberley Stockton (Queen Elizabeth), Holland Taylor (The Great Leader), Samara Weaving (Thea), Peter Wick (Zenny), Alex Winter (Bill), Tommie Wong (Kubla Khan), Ned Yousef (Gandhi)

Running Time: 91 mins

Classification: PG (Australia), PG (UK), PG-13 (USA)

OUR BILL & TED FACE THE MUSIC REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Bill & Ted Face The Music Review:

I can still remember the first time I saw a Bill & Ted film. I was in Primary School and while at my friend’s place he shoved this pink and purple VHS into my hands and said “Dude, we need to watch this.” From that moment I was hooked with these likable idiots. I wanted to be them so much that they are probably one of the reasons why I love hard rock and I’d be lying if I didn’t say I used some of the things I learned from the film when it came to History at High School.

Yes, I wanted to be Bill and Ted but then I grew up. I graduated, went to College, got married and bought a house… like adults do. But according to what we find in the new instalment of the Bill & Ted franchise people don’t change – they are the same forever. Yes, it is ridiculous to think that way but that is what any audience going into this film is expected to think.

Set nearly thirty years after the originals Bill And Ted Face The Music find Bill (Alex Winter – Grand Piano) and Ted (Keanu Reeves – John Wick) completely washed up but the fathers of two daughters – Thea (Samara Weaving – Guns Akimbo) and Billie (Brigette Lundy-Paine – The Glass Castle). The two’s music careers are over and their marriages are in tatters – in general their lives are a mess.

Then out of the blue Kelly (Kristan Schall – The Muppets) turns up from the future to tell them that the world is about to end if Bill and Ted can’t create the perfect song. The two travel through time to try and find how they wrote the perfect song while being pursued by a deadly assassin named Dennis Caleb McCoy (Anthony Carrigan – Gotham). Meanwhile Thea and Billie begin their own journey through time in a bid to build the perfect band for their fathers.

To be honest this was probably one of the most disappointing films I have watched in a long time. I wanted to see the filmmakers, director Dean Parisot (Galaxy Quest) and his screenwriting team, doing something really special with this film; instead I got something that was slightly insulting to my childhood. Not only is the film plain dumb and feature nothing ‘spectacular’ that I was hoping for but the film seems to be ill thought out. I get that Bill and Ted are losers whose lives have never reached the potential that they should have; you know what as a fan of Jay and Silent Bob I can deal with that. What I can’t deal with or even believe is that they are so juvenile that they still speak like stoners so much later in their lives… it is so ridiculous that nobody can comprehend it.

Likewise the film does nothing ‘special.’ Despite a few moments that might make you chuckle Bill and Ted’s journey is this film is lacklustre and nowhere near as exciting as the journey in their original film. I can’t help but wonder why the writers didn’t do more things like the brilliant Dave Grohl cameo – this film needed to be epic not the lacklustre yawn fest that it became.

There are times during this film that the script is so stupid that I swear Keanu Reeves looks uncomfortable. We know what a brilliant actor he is but there are times during the film where his ‘stoner’ language and laugh seem to be ‘forced’ and you can see his mind asking “why did I sign up for this?” Despite the quality of the performers in the film, including Samara Weaving, this is not a film that is going to end up a highlight on anyone’s acting resume.

There will be a lot of people out there who go out and watch Bill And Ted Face The Music simply because of the nostalgia factor. As a fan of the original movies though I have to warn you that you will be sadly disappointed.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Kyle McGrath’s Bill & Ted Face The Music Review:

Kyle McGrath’s Rating Out Of 5:

Average Subculture Rating:

IMDB Rating:

Bill & Ted Face the Music (2020) on IMDb

Other Subculture Bill & Ted Face The Music Reviews:

Nil

Trailer:

Fury

Summary: April, 1945. A battle-hardened army sergeant named Wardaddy commands a Sherman tank and her five-man crew on a deadly mission behind enemy lines.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 23rd October, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA, UK, China

Director: David Ayer

Screenwriter: David Ayer

Cast: Jon Bernthal (Grady ‘Coon-Ass’ Travis), Jamie Ben Chambers (Pvt. James ‘Gremlin’), Daniel Dorr (Lt. Obersturmfuher Schmidt), Scott Eastwood (Sergeant Miles), Bernhard Forcher (Sturmbannfuhrer Muller), Edin Gali (Sgt. Hauptscharfuhrer Wolfe), Brad William Henke (Sergeant Davis), Jason Isaacs (Captain Waggoner), Eugenia Kuzmina (Hilda Meier), Shia LaBeouf (Boyd ‘Bible’ Swan), Logan Lerman (Norman Ellison), Christopher Maleki (Kettle), Anamaria Marinca (Irma), Osi Okerafor (Benton), Jim Parrack (Sergeant Binkowski), Michael Pena (Trini ‘Gordo’ Garcia), Brad Pitt (Don ‘Wardaddy’ Collier), Xavier Samuel (Lieutenant Parker), Clayton T. Smith (Foothill), Laurence Spellman (Sergeant Dillard), Kevin Vance (Sergeant Peterson), Alicia von Rittberg (Emma), Tom Whelehan (Foxman)

Runtime: 134 mins

Classification: MA15+

 

OUR FURY REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Greg King: You can check out Greg’s Fury review on www.filmreviews.net.au

Stars(3.5)

 

David Griffiths:

There have been countless films over the years that have taken audiences deep into the horrors and nastiness of war. Of course there are the perennial favourites like Apocalypse Now and Saving Private Ryan which will always be trotted out when these kinds of films have been talked about. There are also Australian classics like Breaker Morant and Gallipoli which also take a look at the darker side of history’s battles.

Now director/writer David Ayer has decided to enter that fray with the much publicised Fury. Now the thought of Ayer at the helm of a war film is almost enough to make you salivate. His shaky cam style normally has the effect on you as an audience member that makes you feel like you are right there and part of the action. The thought of that happening in a war is like porn to those that label themselves a ‘war film fan.’ Then Ayer kind of shocked everyone by announcing that the cast of Fury would consists of Brad Pitt, Percy Jackson himself Logan Lerman and the man who is trying very hard to make himself Hollywood’s biggest nutbag Shia LaBeouf. But to Ayer’s credit, he damn well nails it.

The film centres around a tank crew finding themselves travelling into Germany during the latter days of World War II. The seasoned crew is made up of fearless leader Don ‘Wardaddy’ Collier (Brad Pitt), the religion spouting Boyd ‘Bible’ Swan (Shia LaBeouf), sassy mouthed Trini ‘Gordo’ Garcia (Michael Pena) and the man with the don’t-mess-with-me attitude Grady ‘Coon-Ass’ Travis (Jon Bernthal).

With the Allied Forces copping a pounding as they journey further into enemy territory it’s not surprising that one of Wardaddy’s crew dies in action, but what he doesn’t expect is that the replacement crew member that he is sent is the very green Norman Ellison (Logan Lerman), a man who has not only seen no battle so far but was chosen to be in the Army for the fact that he could type at sixty words a minute rather than his abilities in killing Nazi soldiers.

With all the fears that I had when I first walked into the cinema to see Fury aside, Ayer really needs a big pat on the back for congratulations. Fury is not only well acted by a cast that many feared were not up to the task but also looks remarkably good. The fight scenes and even the CGI look really, really natural which is not bad when you consider that this film was put together with a budget of only $68 million. That’s right Ayer has managed to put together an epic war movie for less than what most studios would spend on a comedy these days.

Fury’s strong point is that it is engaging and suspenseful. Ayer quickly educates his audience on the fact that he can deliver a scene with two German woman having lunch with the tank crew and make it just as suspenseful as any tank battle that also takes place during the film. He also shows very early on that this is a film that is going to truly show the horrors of war, and that means some blood splatter. Those expecting Brad Pitt to be playing a pretty boy are quickly shocked out of their seats by the opening scene in which Pitt leaps of a tank and kills a Nazi soldier by driving a knife right through his eye.

Ayer drags his audience deep not only into the inner workings of a tank but also into the inner minds of a tank crew while bringing a constant feel of suspense to the film. Even sitting up in the cinema with your popcorn and drink you could feel the tenseness coming from the screen as you are never really sure what lays around each corner that the tank slowly takes. But Ayer’s talents as a director are really on show with the finale battle scene and with one of the most gun wrenching scenes you are likely to see in a cinema this year when Wardaddy literally forces Norman to commit his first Nazi kill. A drawn out five minute scene that looks like it would have drained the two actors involved while also having the audience right on the edge of their seat.

But Ayer’s brilliance and the fact that he is willing to break Hollywood rules left, right and centre throughout Fury only leaves you wondering why he would then allow for two extremely limp wristed moments to also sneak through the editing process. While not wanting to spoil the film for anybody that hasn’t seen it there are two weak scenes later in this film that just don’t fit with the tone set up throughout the rest of the movie. One contains perhaps the kindest S.S Soldier of all time and the second has some of those rare Nazi grenades that could explode right next to someone without leaving a single mark on them.

One of the most powerful things about Fury is that Ayer gets the absolute best out of his cast. Long gone are the days where Pitt is selected on just his looks alone. Here he puts on a clinic of character acting, despite seeming to be the only U.S. Solider capable of keeping perfect hair throughout the whole battle campaign.

Pitt is also well supported by his younger cast members. LaBeouf and Lerman easily show that they have perhaps been hiding their true talents from cinema audiences previously in the gigantic blockbusters that they have headlined. LaBeouf shows, like he has with Nymphomaniac, that it is time for him to start making some serious films and no longer be labelled ‘that guy from Transformers’ and it seems almost unfair that he is labelled ‘wacky’ for going to the extremes of pulling teeth for a role when those same people praise Christian Bale for putting his health at risk to lose weight for a film. Lerman also surprises those who only know him as Percy Jackson with a well rounded performance of a soldier who is almost in a constant state of shock.

Fury is one film that really does deliver to film fans with some very vast differences in taste. Ayder does enough with his action scenes to keep the adrenalin junkies happy, but also make this a character piece with some serious dramatic moments that really explore just how damaged men of a war can become. Despite the two weak moments towards the films finale Fury is still one of the better films of 2014.

Stars(4)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(4)

 

IMDB Rating: Fury (2014) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Reviews of ‘Fury′: For our full Fury review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #102 . You can also check Dave’s Fury review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer: