Tagged: Jason Isaacs

Summary: 
A 15-year-old swimming prodigy self-destructs after his father is released from jail.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates:  2nd September 2021 (Australia)

VOD Release Dates: 16th September 2021 (Australia)

Country: Australia

Director: Tyson Wade Johnston

Screenwriter: Tyson Wade Johnston

Cast: Steve Bastoni (Glenn Goodman), C.J. Bloomfield (Dwayne), Isaac Drandic (Mick Hill), Laura Gordon (Kim Lane), Jason Isaacs (Rob Bush), Levi Miller (Benjamin Lane), Robert Morgan (Coach Clarke), Ebony Naye (Joyce), Paula Nazarski (Cathy Hill), Hunter Page-Lochard (Josh Hill), Sam Parsonson (Nick Bush), Jake Ryan (Dave Bush), Ian Thorpe (himself), Joey Vieira (Eddie Rivers), Tasia Zalar (Patti Hill)

Running Time: 86 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia)

OUR STREAMLINE REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Streamline Review:

Given Australia’s love affair with sport I am surprised that over the years Australian filmmakers haven’t made more ‘great’ sports films. Of course there have been some stand-outs, The Club and September, spring to mind but largely when Aussies have tackled the sports genre the films have had a bad soapy feel to them, for examples take another look at The Cup or Ride Like A Girl.

Directed by first time feature film director Tyson Wade Johnson and produced by Australian swimming legend Ian Thorpe I feel that this is one of the first gritty sports films that we have seen in Australian for a long time. How gritty? Well I would have to say that this film is almost on par with The Wrestler.

Benjamin Lane (Levi Miller – Pan) is a gifted young swimmer, actually he is more than just gifted his Coach (Robert Morgan – Hacksaw Ridge) feels that he has what it takes to become an Olympic champion. And life is going pretty well for him as well, he is getting good grades at school, his girlfriend Patti (Tasia Zalar – Mystery Road) is deeply devoted to him and his mother, Kim (Laura Gordon – Undertow) is willing to make any sacrifice necessary to see her son become a champion.

But then everything starts to fall apart when his abusive father, Rob (Jason Isaacs – Harry Potter And The Chamber Of Secrets), is released from prison. Benjamin’s life begins to spiral when Rob reaches out him and soon he finds himself drawn to the ‘loser’ lifestyle of drinking and partying that his two brothers, Dave (Jake Ryan – The Great Gatsby) and Nick (Sam Parsonson – Hacksaw Ridge), have chosen to live.

My first thought while watching Streamline was that this is a sports film that is nothing like anything that we have ever made here before. For once this is a sports film that goes behind the glory of the sport itself and shows the personal side of the person competing. Often with Australian sports films I find that the film wants to glorify the victories but quickly skip past the mental and physical demons that the star themselves may have had to overcome to get there. Films like The Cup and Ride Like A Girl are great examples – both the stars depicted in those films overcome a lot to get where they needed to be but a lot of the ‘hard times’ were shown in montages etc whereas Streamline hones in on those ‘hard times’ and makes them the centre piece of the film.

The result is a film that draws you in and makes you feel the pain and anguish that Benjamin is going through. To the credit of Johnson’s screenplay he doesn’t hold anything back from his audience no matter how dark it is. He steers away from Hollywood clichés, there are no inspirational chats by girlfriend or coach as Benjamin begins to throw his career away, instead it is the more natural ‘you’re a dickhead’ and anger and resentment towards him.

The result of the power and tension that Johnson creates throughout this film is a movie that even non-sports fans are going to find themselves compelled to. Films like Varsity Blues have tried to go down this road in the past but they have held back from going completely into the dark – Streamline does not.

I couldn’t help but also feel blown away by the acting performances here in the film. I think most film lovers already know that Levi Miller is going to become a star and his performance here just cements that. Let’s be honest if this film was American people would already be starting to say that there is an Oscar whisper around his performance.

Backing up Miller is an emotional performance by Laura Gordon, who I feel is one of the most under-rated character actresses in this country, and some true brilliance from Jake Ryan whose character Dave is the devil on Benjamin’s shoulder telling him to throw everything away.Streamline is an amazing piece of Australian cinema. I feel it shows the industry how a sports film should be made and it is a film not be missed even just for the once in a lifetime performance by Levi Miller.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Average Subculture Rating:

Other Subculture Streamline Reviews:

Nil

Trailer:

To free Baba Yaga and Renfield from the clutches of Monster Hunter Mila Starr, the Wishbone Family once more transforms into a Vampire, Frankenstein’s Monster, a Mummy and a Werewolf. Aided and abetted by their three pet bats, our Monster Family zooms around the world again to save their friends, make new monstrous acquaintances and finally come to the realization that ‘Nobody’s Perfect’ – even those with flaws can find happiness.

MONSTER FAMILY 2 is directed by Holger Tappe and stars Emily Watson, Nick Frost, Jessica Brown Findlay, Catherine Tate, Emily Carey, Ethan Rouse and Jason Isaacs  

MONSTER FAMILY 2 coming to Australian cinemas on October 28

 

 

Umbrella Entertainment is proud to announce the theatrical release date of its latest quality Australian cinematic drama, STREAMLINE – starring Jason Isaacs, Levi Miller and Laura Gordon – which will screen in cinemas nationally on September 2, 2021.

The feature film debut of writer/director Tyson Wade Johnston, STREAMLINE will have its World Premiere at Melbourne International Film Festival in August, followed by regional screenings as part of the MIFF Travelling Showcase, and CinefestOZ Film Festival.

STREAMLINE is a coming-of-age sports drama about a fifteen-year-old swimming prodigy fighting to stay afloat as he faces pressure in the world of competitive sports, amidst overwhelming family problems.

Featuring a cameo performance by Australian swimming champion and Olympic gold medallist, Ian Thorpe (who is also Executive Producer on the film), the stellar cast also includes Jake Ryan, Tasia Zalar, Sam Parsonson, Hunter Page-Lochard and Joey Viera.

STREAMLINE is a Bronte Pictures production, made with assistance from Screen Queensland, Screen Australia and Pantalon Pictures. It is produced by Blake Northfield, Nathan Walker and Jay Douglas.

Over the past weekend, Australian Indie film ‘Occupation: Rainfall’ enjoyed a top 10 position in North America across VOD and home release platforms.  Distributed in America by Saban Films, the dystopian sci-fi is set for global distribution including the UK, France, Germany, Japan, Middle East, Scandinavia, South Korea, Taiwan, Spain and Vietnam.
 
 
With VFX done by the same team behind Star Wars: The Last Jedi and Blade Runner 2049, Luke Sparke’s Occupation: Rainfall delivers a thrilling sci-fi epic that is firmly set to impress audiences all over the world.  Starring Ken Jeong, Temuera Morrison, Daniel Gillies and Jason Isaacs and directed and written by Luke Sparke, produced by mother and daughter team Carly & Carmel Imrie (OccupationRed Billabong) and co-executive producer Todd Williams (The NunAlex and Me), the action packed film showcases the scenic hills of Australia’s Blue Mountains to the war-torn streets of Sydney.
 
Leading entertainment review website, Flickering Myth claims, “It’s War of the Worlds meets Terminator: Salvation spliced with Guardians of the Galaxy…..if you want a science fiction action film then this delivers”.
 
Occupation: Rainfall will have its home release in Australia through Umbrella Entertainment and Monster Pictures on June 16.  The film will be available on Blu-Ray (featuring audio commentary tracks and deleted scenes), DVD, Foxtel Store, iTunes, Google Play and more. The UK release in cinemas and on demand is July 9 by Signature Entertainment. The Europe and Asian markets will then follow.
 
With three years in production, Occupation: Rainfall features over 1,500 special effects, and stars a brilliant multicultural ensemble cast of Australian and international talent. Due to its international success, a sequel, ‘Rainfall: Chapter 2’, is in active development, with the script completed and international casting already commenced.

 

Warner Bros. will make its new animated feature film “SCOOB!” available for both Premium Video On Demand (PVOD) and for premium digital ownership in Australia and New Zealand from today, providing high-quality family entertainment in the home just in time for school holidays.

 

“We know ‘SCOOB!’ has been highly anticipated in Australia and New Zealand, so we’re pleased we can deliver this action-packed movie for families to experience at home during the school holidays,” said Joel Pearlman, CEO of Roadshow Films.

 

SCOOB!” will be available to premiere at home for a 48-hour rental via Premium Video On Demand or premium digital ownership beginning on Wednesday, July 1. The title will be available on participating digital platforms.

 

A fully animated, full-length Scooby-Doo action adventure for the whole family, “SCOOB!” reveals how lifelong friends Scooby and Shaggy first met and how they joined with young detectives Fred, Velma and Daphne to form the famous Mystery Inc. Now, with hundreds of cases solved and adventures shared, Scooby and the gang face their biggest, most challenging mystery ever: a plot to unleash the ghost dog Cerberus upon the world. As they race to stop this global “dogpocalypse,” the gang discovers that Scooby has a secret legacy and an epic destiny greater than anyone imagined. 

“SCOOB!” features an all-star ensemble cast led by Will Forte, two-time Oscar nominee Mark Wahlberg, Jason Isaacs, Gina Rodriguez, Zac Efron, Amanda Seyfried, Kiersey Clemons, Ken Jeong, Tracy Morgan, Simon Cowell, and Frank Welker.

 

The film was directed by Warner Bros. animation stalwart Tony Cervone, an Annie Award nominee for the feature film “Space Jam,” two-time Emmy nominee for his work on “Duck Dodgers” and one of the creators of the popular Scooby-Doo series “Mystery Incorporated.” It was produced by Pam Coats and Allison Abbate.  Adam Sztykiel, Charles Roven, Richard Suckle, Jesse Ehrman, Dan Povenmire, and Chris Columbus served as executive producers. The “SCOOB!” screenplay was by Adam Sztykiel and Jack C. Donaldson & Derek Elliott and Matt Lieberman, story by Matt Lieberman and Eyal Podell & Jonathon E. Stewart, based on characters created by Hanna-Barbera Productions. Cervone’s creative team included editors Ryan Folsey and Vanara Taing, and composer Tom Holkenborg.

 

A presentation of Warner Bros. Pictures and Warner Animation Group, “SCOOB!” is distributed worldwide by Warner Bros. Pictures and by Roadshow Films in Australia and New Zealand.

 

“Scooby-Doo” and all related indicia are trademarks and copyright of Hanna-Barbera Productions © 2020 Warner Bros. Ent. All Rights Reserved.

 

Roadshow Films is set to release another film in the successful RED DOG franchise in cinemas on December 5th, 2019.

The feature film, entitled KOKO: A RED DOG STORY, was produced by Nelson Woss (RED DOG, RED DOG TRUE BLUE and NED KELLY), and Lauren Brunswick (TOP KNOT DETECTIVE), written and directed by Dominic Pearce and Aaron McCann (TOP KNOT DETECTIVE).

KOKO: A RED DOG STORY is a Woss Group Film Production, receiving principal funding from Screen Australia in association with Screenwest and Lotterywest.

The film follows the story of Koko – the dog who played Red Dog in the first film and appeared in RED DOG: TRUE BLUE.

Jason Isaacs (THE HARRY POTTER FRANCHISE, THE PATRIOT and PETER PAN) narrates the film.

“It’s a love story about why we love dogs,” said producer Nelson Woss. “Koko had an amazing life and his impact on people and communities is his legacy. The release will work closely with animal shelters and community-based charities offering them the opportunity to use the film for charity events & screenings”.

Roadshow Films, who distributed and executive produced the 2011 box office smash-hit RED DOG and RED DOG: TRUE BLUE in 2016 – will distribute the new film in Australia alongside Good Dog Distribution.

“Red Dog found a place in the hearts of all Australians in 2011 to become a box office smash and an instant family favourite. We are thrilled to be distributing the next chapter in this incredible canine adventure” said Joel Pearlman, CEO Roadshow Films.


Start at

Red Dog; True Blue Poster

Summary: An iconic Australian story of family, friendship and adventure, between a young boy and a scrappy one-of-a-kind dog that would grow up to become an Australian legend.

Year: 2016

Australian Cinema Release Date: 26th December 2016

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Australia

Director: Kriv Stenders

Screenwriter: Daniel Taplitz

Cast: Josie Alec (Abby), Caitlin Berestford-Ord (Catherine), Syd Brisbane (Big John), Bryan Brown (Grandpa), Kee Chan (Jimmy Umbrella), Justine Clarke (Diane Carter), Thomas Cocquerel (Stemple), Jon Doust (McLeod), Alla Hand (Gilliam Shaw), Jason Isaacs (Michael Carter), John Jarratt (Lang Hangcock), Hanna Mangan Laurence (Betty), Steve Le Marquand (Little John), Winta McGrath (Nicholas Carter), Zen McGrath (Theo Carter), Levi Miller (Mick), Kelton Pell (Durack), Igor Sas (Dr. Samuel), Calen Tassone (Taylor Pete)

Runtime: 88 mins

Classification: PG

OUR RED DOG: TRUE BLUE REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

Nobody ever expected the original Red Dog film to go onto the greatness that it did when it was released back in 2011. Somehow the little Aussie family film showed the world that the Australian film industry wasn’t dead. While the industry had seen many Aussie filmmakers try the comedy vein, it seems it was the family comedy vein that still had life in it. The film grossed over $21 million in Australia alone.

Of course, not surprisingly word of a Red Dog sequel started to seep through while the first film was still raking in money at the box office. The only man who didn’t seem interested in the concept was the director Kriv Stenders (Boxing Day) who was already busy on his next project – the cult film Kill Me Three Times starring Simon Pegg. Along the way, though something changed and now five years later we find ourselves sitting down to watch a prequel to the original – Red Dog: True Blue.

There is little wonder that Stenders was nervous about making another Red Dog film, a dud could tarnish the legacy that the first left behind. Luckily though Stenders once again teamed up with screenwriter Daniel Taplitz (Chaos Theory) and together the two men came up with a film that is different enough from the original film to give it its own identity, but not different enough to alienate fans of the first in the series.

This second film is told through the eyes of a Perth father Michael Carter (Jason IsaacsBlack Hawk Down) who after watching the original Red Dog movie in the cinema recounts the story of how he was actually the original owner of Red… or Blue as he was called back then. His story tells of his younger self (Levi MillerPan) being forced to leave home because of his mentally unstable mother and moving to outback Western Australia where he lived with his grandfather (Bryan BrownAustralia). On a cattle station.

The story sees Mick meet Blue and tells of the adventures that they had together including Mick falling in love for the first time, with his tutor the young and beautiful Betty (Hanna Mangan Laurence Acolytes).

Fans of the original film will see very early on that Stenders and Taplitz are onto a winning formula when they see the creative way that leads to Michael Carter telling his story. While it seems a little strange for the film to be referencing the first film so openly, but at that same time it so creative that you can’t help but applaud at the pure genius act that the two men have managed to deliver.

While Red Dog: True Blue is creative it does lack a little of the emotion that we felt from the first film. I’m man enough to admit that I teared up twice during Red Dog, but here Stenders and co takes the film in a completely different direction, this time the film is a pure coming of age story that sees a young boy take his dog with him on the start of life’s journey. While the film does also have a few moments that are likely to make you chuckle it doesn’t have anywhere near as many comedic moments as the first movie either.

Those that benefit from Stenders work here is the cast. Levi Miller is almost unrecognisable as the younger version of Mick and he settles into the period style of the film well. It is great to see Hanna Mangan Laurence back on the big screen and hopefully, we see her there again soon while as usual Bryan Brown leads the way with a mature performance as he leads the cast despite seemingly being in auto-pilot for most of the film. The big scene stealer here though is John Jarratt (Wolf Creek) who has a cameo as mining magnate Lang Hancock… and boy is it a cameo to remember.

Red Dog: True Blue is a smooth, enjoyable ride for the whole family. It might not reach the heights that the first film did but it is still a film that holds its own and reminds audiences just how fun it still can be to watch a coming-of-age story. The fact that it is being released on Boxing Day makes it the perfect family cinema outing this holiday season.

Stars(3)

 

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3)

 

IMDB Rating:  No rating available.

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Red Dog: True Blue Reviews: Dave Griffiths broadcast a Red Dog: True Blue on 2UE’s That’s Entertainment on the 8th December, 2016.

Trailer:

Fury

Summary: April, 1945. A battle-hardened army sergeant named Wardaddy commands a Sherman tank and her five-man crew on a deadly mission behind enemy lines.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 23rd October, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA, UK, China

Director: David Ayer

Screenwriter: David Ayer

Cast: Jon Bernthal (Grady ‘Coon-Ass’ Travis), Jamie Ben Chambers (Pvt. James ‘Gremlin’), Daniel Dorr (Lt. Obersturmfuher Schmidt), Scott Eastwood (Sergeant Miles), Bernhard Forcher (Sturmbannfuhrer Muller), Edin Gali (Sgt. Hauptscharfuhrer Wolfe), Brad William Henke (Sergeant Davis), Jason Isaacs (Captain Waggoner), Eugenia Kuzmina (Hilda Meier), Shia LaBeouf (Boyd ‘Bible’ Swan), Logan Lerman (Norman Ellison), Christopher Maleki (Kettle), Anamaria Marinca (Irma), Osi Okerafor (Benton), Jim Parrack (Sergeant Binkowski), Michael Pena (Trini ‘Gordo’ Garcia), Brad Pitt (Don ‘Wardaddy’ Collier), Xavier Samuel (Lieutenant Parker), Clayton T. Smith (Foothill), Laurence Spellman (Sergeant Dillard), Kevin Vance (Sergeant Peterson), Alicia von Rittberg (Emma), Tom Whelehan (Foxman)

Runtime: 134 mins

Classification: MA15+

 

OUR FURY REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Greg King: You can check out Greg’s Fury review on www.filmreviews.net.au

Stars(3.5)

 

David Griffiths:

There have been countless films over the years that have taken audiences deep into the horrors and nastiness of war. Of course there are the perennial favourites like Apocalypse Now and Saving Private Ryan which will always be trotted out when these kinds of films have been talked about. There are also Australian classics like Breaker Morant and Gallipoli which also take a look at the darker side of history’s battles.

Now director/writer David Ayer has decided to enter that fray with the much publicised Fury. Now the thought of Ayer at the helm of a war film is almost enough to make you salivate. His shaky cam style normally has the effect on you as an audience member that makes you feel like you are right there and part of the action. The thought of that happening in a war is like porn to those that label themselves a ‘war film fan.’ Then Ayer kind of shocked everyone by announcing that the cast of Fury would consists of Brad Pitt, Percy Jackson himself Logan Lerman and the man who is trying very hard to make himself Hollywood’s biggest nutbag Shia LaBeouf. But to Ayer’s credit, he damn well nails it.

The film centres around a tank crew finding themselves travelling into Germany during the latter days of World War II. The seasoned crew is made up of fearless leader Don ‘Wardaddy’ Collier (Brad Pitt), the religion spouting Boyd ‘Bible’ Swan (Shia LaBeouf), sassy mouthed Trini ‘Gordo’ Garcia (Michael Pena) and the man with the don’t-mess-with-me attitude Grady ‘Coon-Ass’ Travis (Jon Bernthal).

With the Allied Forces copping a pounding as they journey further into enemy territory it’s not surprising that one of Wardaddy’s crew dies in action, but what he doesn’t expect is that the replacement crew member that he is sent is the very green Norman Ellison (Logan Lerman), a man who has not only seen no battle so far but was chosen to be in the Army for the fact that he could type at sixty words a minute rather than his abilities in killing Nazi soldiers.

With all the fears that I had when I first walked into the cinema to see Fury aside, Ayer really needs a big pat on the back for congratulations. Fury is not only well acted by a cast that many feared were not up to the task but also looks remarkably good. The fight scenes and even the CGI look really, really natural which is not bad when you consider that this film was put together with a budget of only $68 million. That’s right Ayer has managed to put together an epic war movie for less than what most studios would spend on a comedy these days.

Fury’s strong point is that it is engaging and suspenseful. Ayer quickly educates his audience on the fact that he can deliver a scene with two German woman having lunch with the tank crew and make it just as suspenseful as any tank battle that also takes place during the film. He also shows very early on that this is a film that is going to truly show the horrors of war, and that means some blood splatter. Those expecting Brad Pitt to be playing a pretty boy are quickly shocked out of their seats by the opening scene in which Pitt leaps of a tank and kills a Nazi soldier by driving a knife right through his eye.

Ayer drags his audience deep not only into the inner workings of a tank but also into the inner minds of a tank crew while bringing a constant feel of suspense to the film. Even sitting up in the cinema with your popcorn and drink you could feel the tenseness coming from the screen as you are never really sure what lays around each corner that the tank slowly takes. But Ayer’s talents as a director are really on show with the finale battle scene and with one of the most gun wrenching scenes you are likely to see in a cinema this year when Wardaddy literally forces Norman to commit his first Nazi kill. A drawn out five minute scene that looks like it would have drained the two actors involved while also having the audience right on the edge of their seat.

But Ayer’s brilliance and the fact that he is willing to break Hollywood rules left, right and centre throughout Fury only leaves you wondering why he would then allow for two extremely limp wristed moments to also sneak through the editing process. While not wanting to spoil the film for anybody that hasn’t seen it there are two weak scenes later in this film that just don’t fit with the tone set up throughout the rest of the movie. One contains perhaps the kindest S.S Soldier of all time and the second has some of those rare Nazi grenades that could explode right next to someone without leaving a single mark on them.

One of the most powerful things about Fury is that Ayer gets the absolute best out of his cast. Long gone are the days where Pitt is selected on just his looks alone. Here he puts on a clinic of character acting, despite seeming to be the only U.S. Solider capable of keeping perfect hair throughout the whole battle campaign.

Pitt is also well supported by his younger cast members. LaBeouf and Lerman easily show that they have perhaps been hiding their true talents from cinema audiences previously in the gigantic blockbusters that they have headlined. LaBeouf shows, like he has with Nymphomaniac, that it is time for him to start making some serious films and no longer be labelled ‘that guy from Transformers’ and it seems almost unfair that he is labelled ‘wacky’ for going to the extremes of pulling teeth for a role when those same people praise Christian Bale for putting his health at risk to lose weight for a film. Lerman also surprises those who only know him as Percy Jackson with a well rounded performance of a soldier who is almost in a constant state of shock.

Fury is one film that really does deliver to film fans with some very vast differences in taste. Ayder does enough with his action scenes to keep the adrenalin junkies happy, but also make this a character piece with some serious dramatic moments that really explore just how damaged men of a war can become. Despite the two weak moments towards the films finale Fury is still one of the better films of 2014.

Stars(4)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(4)

 

IMDB Rating: Fury (2014) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Reviews of ‘Fury′: For our full Fury review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #102 . You can also check Dave’s Fury review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer: