Tagged: Canada

Vancouver, BC Canada based Metalcore band 2 Shadows have released their debut EP Bring The Cold Inside on Rock Shop Records. They are also sharing the video for lead track ‘Boulevard Of Broken Dreams’ that features Ryan Hayes of Righteous Vendetta on guest vocals.  The song has been added to key Rock & Metal playlists at Spotify, Apple Music, Amazon Music, and more.

The band’s Glen Bridden explains: ““When Tryst and I started experimenting with different songs to cover on the EP we both felt an immediate connection to Green Day’s ‘Boulevard of Broken Dreams’. We went through a huge turning point, in the past year especially, where we needed to start making sacrifices in our daily lives in order to keep the band growing. We had to seriously re-allocate our time to focus on our dream and it caused some of our personal relationships to wither or break off entirely. ‘Boulevard’ describes this feeling of isolation brilliantly and it was a very cathartic outlet for us. Our interpretation of the song really goes out to all the people who have sacrificed to pursue their dreams and to the 2 Shadows community who continue to support us every step of the way.”

2 Shadows has been together since 2015 and have been steadily honing their craft through continuous touring. They draw inspiration from legendary acts like Slipknot and Rammstein, while also being influenced by contemporary acts such as Motionless In White, Asking Alexandria, and Avenged Sevenfold.  Bridden says “Our live show is just as important to us as our recorded music. We try to make our live performances a visual representation of our songs.  We are constantly building and evolving our stage show so our fans can always expect something different and exciting”. 

The material comprising the ‘Bring The Cold Inside’ EP channels the strife and chaos of existence into art that seeks to find silver linings when all hope seems lost. An uncompromising onslaught of aggressively slamming beats and destructively craggy riffs — topped with majestic keyboards, anthemic choruses and vocals that go from a grim gothic whisper to a bloodcurdling flamethrower scream at the drop of a detuned D. The EP is the metaphorical lighthouse in the storm of life, guiding listeners toward a better, healthier future. It’s Heavy Rock and Roll rooted in the best of metal’s history, yet undeniably future-facing.

The band recently spoke to Dave Griffiths and you can hear the full interview right here:

Summary: 
A mysterious force knocks the moon from its orbit around Earth and sends it hurtling on a collision course with life as we know it.

Year: 2022

Cinema Release Dates:  3rd February 2022 (Australia), 3rd February 2022 (Thailand), 4th February 2022 (UK), 4th February 2022 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: USA, China, Canada, UK

Director: Roland Emmerich

Screenwriter: Spenser Cohen, Roland Emmerich, Harald Kloser

Cast: Andreas Apergis (Lt. Colonel Reed), Carolina Bartczak (Brenda Lopez), Andre Bedard (Captain Avery), Halle Berry (Jocinda ‘Jo’ Fowler), Stephen Bogaert (NASA Director Albert Hutchings), Ryan Bommarito (Ziggy), John Bradley (KC Houseman), Katy Breier (Bling), Josh Cruddas (Scrawny), Kathleen Fee (Elaine Houseman), Frank Fiola (Alan Marcus), Kyle Gatehouse (Jules), Eme Ikwuafor (Doug Davidson), Zayne Maloney (Jimmy (10 Years Old)), Piotr Michael (Chuck), Hazel Nugent (Lauren Lopez (12 Years Old)), Michael Pena (Tom Lopez), Charlie Plummer (Sonny Harper), Maxim Roy (Sgt. Gabriella Auclair), Chris Sandiford (Mosley), Frank Schorpion (General Jenkins), Jonathan Maxwell Silver (Johansen), Donald Sutherland (Holdenfield), Ava Weiss (Nikki Lopez (9 Years Old), Patrick Wilson (Brian Harper), Wenwen Yu (Michelle)

Running Time: 130 mins

Classification: M (Australia), 15 (Thailand), 12A (UK), PG-13 (USA)

OUR MOONFALL REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Moonfall Review:

You really have to wonder what the Earth has ever done to director Roland Emmerich. With the movies that he has penned and directed over the years it feels like Emmerich is always thinking of ways to destroy the planet that we live on. From creature feature Godzilla, to alien warfare in Independence Day and doomsday films 2012 and The Day After Tomorrow Emmerich has brought planet destruction to the big screen on a number of occasions. Now he is at it again with the epic Moonfall.

The film begins with a disastrous space-walk for astronauts Brian Harper (Patrick Wilson – The Conjuring) and Jocinda Fowl (Halle Berry – Catwoman). When they come under attack they nearly lose their lives but worse still is the fallout. Harper claims that they were attacked by a swam of ‘something’ but when questioned about the event Fowl denies it.

The story then picks up years later with Harper now disgraced and his marriage over. Meanwhile Fowl has risen through the ranks at NASA and is now highly regarded in her field. They haven’t spoken for years but they are suddenly finding themselves having to work together after Fowl’s team notices that the moon as behaving erratically, causing havoc on Earth, and Harper is confronted by a young ‘astronaut wannabe’ named Houseman (John Bradley – Game Of Thrones) who claims the moon is a machine built by aliens.

Moonfall tries to desperately be something special but sadly is held back by some small things that really should have been ironed out before the film ever reached the big screen. The story itself is interesting enough and the sci-fi element is sheer brilliance (more on that later) but the film is held back by some cheesy and over-written dialogue. Then there are the green screen scenes that just seem to be lazy, such as Harper arriving at the Observatory in Los Angeles. You can understand why green screen would be used for some of the scenes set in space but a mundane scene like the one just mentioned should have been shot for real.

What works amazingly well for this film are the scenes that are set in space but it feels like Emmerich doesn’t realise that. Instead he brings in a storyline that involves Harper’s son, played by Charlie Plummer (Word On Bathroom Walls), and his wife’s new partner (Michael Pena – American Hustle). To be honest the audience never really becomes emotionally involved with that sub-plot or those characters and it really seems to do is take the focus away from the most suspenseful part of the film – what is happening in space.

It is the scenes in space that make this film watchable. The sci-fi twist that occurs in space is creative, engaging and depicts a look and feel that lifts this film to another level. In fact in some ways that element of the story (which we won’t spoil here) is actually better than the storyline that we saw in Promethius.

What also makes these scenes so special is the way that Wilson, Berry and Bradley combine to create a very special ensemble performance. Wilson is normally great in everything he does and here he embraces the opportunity to be an action hero. It is a role that seems to come naturally to him and for once we see an ‘action star’ who actually does have a dramatic range.

Berry also seems to take a step up with the scenes set in space. Gone are the cheesy bits of dialogue that seem to trip her character up when she is on Earth and then there is Bradley who embraces his opportunity on the big screen and brings together the right mix of comedy and drama as he portrays a character who is easily the most interesting in the film.

It is a shame that there are things that hold Moonfall back from becoming a great film because the story that is at the heart of this film is nothing short of sci-fi genius. Moonfall will be enjoyed by those that just want to watch a big, dumb action film but be prepared for those scenes that will make you groan and think ‘what the hell was that.’

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Alex First, Greg King and Peter Krausz’s Moonfall Review:

Alex’s rating Out Of 5:

Greg’s rating Out Of 5:

Peter’s rating Out Of 5:

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You can read our review of Moonfall that appeared in The Phuket News here – https://www.thephuketnews.com/moonfall-lands-where-you-like-it-82970.php

Trailer:

Summary:  The Addams get tangled up in more wacky adventures and find themselves involved in hilarious run-ins with all sorts of unsuspecting characters. Sequel to the 2019 animated film, ‘The Addams Family’.

Year: 2022

Cinema Release Dates:  6th January 2022 (Australia), 28th October 2021 (Thailand), 8th October 2021 (UK), 1st October 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: 1st October 2021 (USA)

Country: USA, Canada

Director: Greg Tiernan, Conrad Vernon

Screenwriter: Dan Hernandez, Benji Samit, Ben Queen, Susanna Fogel

Cast: Ted Evans (Pongo (voice)), Mary Faber (Miss Lurleen/Texas Lady/Pageant Lady/PA (voice)), Bill Hader (Cyrus Strange (voice)), Oscar Isaac (Gomez Adams (voice)), Nick Kroll (Uncle Fester (voice)), Cherami Leigh (Ophelia (voice)), Bette Midler (Grandma (voice)), Chloe Grace Moretz (Wednesday Adams (voice)), Wallace Shawn (Mr. Mustela (voice)), Snoop Dogg (It (voice)), Brian Sommer (Big Bad Ronny (voice)), Charlize Theron (Morticia Adams (voice)), Conrad Vernon (Lurch/Spirit Of The House (voice)), Javon ‘Wanna’ Walton (Pugsley Addams (voice)),

Running Time: 93 mins

Classification: PG (Australia), G (Thailand), PG (UK), PG (USA)

OUR THE ADDAMS FAMILY 2 REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ The Addams Family 2 Review:

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

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Trailer:

Summary:  A young girl’s love for a tiny puppy named Clifford makes the dog grow to an enormous size.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates:  30th December 2021 (Australia), 10th November 2021 (UK), 10th November 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: 10th November 2021 (USA)

Country: UK, USA, Canada

Director: Walt Becker

Screenwriter: Blaise Hemingway, David Ronn, Jay Scherick

Cast: Bear Allen-Blaine (Mrs. Jarvis), Adam Aminov (Reno), Willow Grace Becker (Sara), Darby Camp (Emily), Melanie Chandra (Susan), John Cleese (Bridwell), Keith Ewell (Mr. Jarvis), Tovah Feldshuh (Mrs. Crullerman), Barney Fitzpatrick (Freddy), Jacson Frazer (Sid), Karen Lynn Gorney (Mrs. McKinley), David Alan Grier (Packard), Sienna Guillory (Maggie), Tony Hale (Tieran), Neil Hellegers (Steve), Raymond Neil Hernandez (Colin), Siobhan Fallon Hogan (Peta), Yasha Jackson (Meter Maid/Officer Zapatero), Ty Jones (Police Cheif Watkins), Khari McDowell (Austin), Alex Moffat (Albert), Madison Morris (Melinda), Rosie Perez (Lucille), Russell Peters (Malik), Paul Rodriguez (Alonso), Mia Ronn (Florence), Horatio Sanz (Raul), Madison Smith (Isabelle), Kenan Thompson (Vet), Izaac Wang (Owen), Jack Whitehall (Casey), Russell Wong (Mr. Yu), Jessica Keenan Wynn (Colette)

Running Time: 96 mins

Classification: PG (Australia), PG (UK), PG (USA)

OUR CLIFFORD THE BIG RED DOG REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ and Lee Griffiths’s Clifford The Big Red Dog Review:

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Lee’s rating Out Of 5

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Nil.

Trailer:

Summary:  When Patrizia Reggiani, an outsider from humble beginnings, marries into the Gucci family, her unbridled ambition begins to unravel their legacy and triggers a reckless spiral of betrayal, decadence, revenge, and ultimately…murder.

Year: 2022

Cinema Release Dates:  1st January 2022 (Australia), 26th November 2021 (UK), 24th November 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: USA, Canada

Director: Ridley Scott

Screenwriter: Becky Johnston, Roberto Bentivegna

Cast: Florence Andrews (Jenny Gucci), Antonello Annunziata (Karl Lagerfield), Miloud Mourad Benamara (Omar), Philippe Boa (Bobby Short), Andrea Piedimonte Bodini (Ivano Savioni), Gaetano Bruno (Franco), Reeve Carney (Tom Ford), Camille Cotton (Paolo Franchi), Adam Driver (Maurizio Gucci), Ira Fronten (Maybeline), Madalina Ghenea (Sophia Loren), Salma Hayek (Pina Auriemma), Jack Huston (Domenico De Sole), Jeremy Irons (Rodolfo Gucci), Youssef Kerkour (Nemir Kirdar), Lady Gaga (Patrizia Reggiani), Mauro Lamantia (Max), Jared Leto (Paolo Gucci), Clelia Rossi Marcelli (Alessandra (teenager)), Alexia Murray (Silvana Reggiani), Mehdi Nebbou (Said), Al Pacino (Aldo Gucci), Martino Palmisano (Richard Avedon), Edouard Philipponnat (Walter), Vincent Riotta (Fernando Reggiani), Nicole Bani Sarkute (Alessandra (3 years old)), Vincenzo Tanassi (Benedetto Ceraulo), Catherine Walker (Anna Wintour), Mia McGovern Zaini (Alessandra (9 years old))

Running Time: 158 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia), 15 (UK), R (USA)

OUR HOUSE OF GUCCI REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ House Of Gucci Review:

Gucci! I might not be a fashion expert… okay my wardrobe is mainly made up of jeans and band T-Shirts… but even I was counting down the days until I could check out The House Of Gucci. I have always found  the history of fashion houses and the creative artists that live and work within them fascinating. Over the years I’ve read books and watched countless documentaries to fuel that curiosity and now director Ridley Scott (Prometheus) was going to be playing out one of the greatest sagas to hit a fashion house out on the big screen… how could I not be excited?

The story that Scott chronicles is that of Maurizio Gucci (Adam Driver Paterson). The son of one of the more reclusive Guccis, Rodolfo (Jeremy Irons – The Lion King), originally Maurizio had very little to do with the fashion side of the Gucci family. That side of things was left to his uncle, Aldo (Al Pacino – The Godfather), who operated the business in such a way that it was known for its classic chic when it came to bags and luggage.

But that all changed when Maurizio met Patrizia Reggiani (Lady Gaga – A Star Is Born) whom he immediately fell in love with. Scared of what the relationship would mean for Maurizio his father severed ties with him and soon Maurizio found himself closer to Rodolfo and his hapless dreamer cousin, Paolo (Jared Leto – Suicide Squad). The result was Patrizia urging Maurizio to become more involved with the fashion side of the business and to help turn it around after advice she has received from a clairvoyant named Pina (Salma Hayek – Savages).

As I watched this film play out on the big screen I realised that the story itself is very Shakesperian. The story itself has similarities to Macbeth and as a director Scott enhances that even more by allowing the film to play out it lavish homes and locations and focussing more on dialogue rather than on action and suspense. There are times in this film when Patrizia rants like Lady Macbeth and the suspense that does rear its head throughout the film comes from the characterisation – in particular who is going to act in what way when certain events happen. To be honest there is probably more suspense in this film for those that don’t know the story of Maurzio Gucci. Because I had previously watched a documentary on his life I often knew what was going to happen next, but that certainly wouldn’t be the case for someone that doesn’t know the story because Scott road-signs nothing.

For years I have heard about various Governments in Europe wanting to use cinema as a way to lure tourists to their countries. For the most part the films that have done it have felt forced whereas the way Scott has shot House of Gucci is purely natural yet it had me wanting to visit some of the beautiful gardens and narrow Italian laneways it is set in due to the way they appear on the screen.

Despite some strange casting decisions the performances of the cast here are exceptional. Lady Gaga should well and truly be in contention for an Oscar for her portrayal of Patrizia, while Adam Driver is natural and at times deliberately cold as Maurizio. In real life Maurizio was awkward and rarely showed emotion and that is something that Driver portrays well on the screen here. The strangest casting choice was perhaps Leto as the aloof and simple Paolo. Leto is unrecognisable in the role and once again takes character acting to the next level, hopefully his name is also mentioned once or twice during awards season.

Perhaps the only real weakness of House Of Gucci is a finale that seems a little rushed. I can’t say too much about it because I would be heading into spoiler territory, but the film builds to a climatic event but then just seems to sadly falls away afterwards and the fallout of the event is not explored in the way that it could have been. Still that is a small gripe for a film that mostly holds its drama throughout its expanded runtime.

House Of Gucci is a sensational drama. Scott highlights the Shakesperian nature of the story and delivers some powerful scenes that are further enhanced by a cast that are on the top of their game. Then there is also an awesome 70s and 80s soundtrack that captures the mood of the time perfectly well.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

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Trailer:

Summary:  When a single mom and her two kids arrive in a small town, they begin to discover their connection to the original Ghostbusters and the secret legacy their grandfather left behind.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates:  1st January 2022 (Australia), 13th January 2022 (Thailand), 18th November 2021 (UK), 19th November 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: USA, Canada

Director: Jason Reitman

Screenwriter: Gil Kenan, Jason Reitman

Cast: Shohreh Aghdashloo (Gozer (voice)), Paulina Alexis (Bunny), Dan Aykroyd (Ray Stantz), Stella Akyroyd (Deputy Medjuck), Billy Bryk (Zahk), Carrie Coon (Callie), Oliver Cooper (Elton), Sydney Mae Diaz (Swayze), Hannah Duke (Reseda), Josh Gad (Muncher (voice)), McKenna Grace (Phoebe), Bob Gunton (The Ghost Farmer), Ernie Hudson (Winston Zeddemore), Marlon Kazadi (Thick Neck), Logan Kim (Podcast), Bill Murray (Peter Venkman), Artoun Nazareth (Rufus), Celeste O’Connor (Lucky), Emma Portner (Spirit Of Gozer), Annie Potts (Janine Melnitz), Crystal Rosebourgh (Crystal), Paul Rudd (Grooberson), Shawn Seward (Skittles), J.K. Simmons (Ivo Shandor), Sigourney Weaver (Dana Barrett Venkman), Olivia Wilde (Gozer), Finn Wolfhard (Trevor), Bokeem Woodbine (Sheriff Domingo)

Running Time: 124 mins

Classification: PG (Australia), 12A (UK), PG-13 (USA)

OUR GHOSTBUSTERS: AFTERLIFE REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ and Lee Griffiths’s Ghostbusters: Afterlife Review:

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Lee’s rating Out Of 5

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Trailer:

Summary:  Eddie Brock attempts to reignite his career by interviewing serial killer Cletus Kasady, who becomes the host of the symbiote Carnage and escapes prison after a failed execution.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates:  25th November 2021 (Australia), 2nd December 2021 (Thailand), 15th October 2021 (UK), 1st October 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: USA, UK, Canada

Director: Andy Serkis

Screenwriter: Kelly Marcel

Cast: Jack Bandeira (Young Cletus), Sean Delaney (Young Detective Mulligan), Stephen Graham (Detective Mulligan), Tom Hardy (Eddie Brock/Venom), Naomie Harris (Frances Barrison/Shriek), Woody Harrelson (Cletus Kasady/Carnage), Tom Holland (Peter Parker/Spider-Man), Little Simz (herself), Peggy Lu (Mrs. Chen), Olumide Olorunfemi (Young Shriek), Scroobius Pip (Siegfred), Reid Scott (Dr. Dan Lewis), J.K. Simmons (J. Jonah Jameson), Alfredo Tavares (Kennedy H), Sian Webber (Dr. Pazzo), Michelle Williams (Anne Weying)

Running Time: 97 mins

Classification: M (Australia), 15 (UK), 13 (USA)

OUR VENOM: LET THERE BE CARNAGE REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ and Kyle McGrath’s Venom: Let There Be Carnage Review:

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Kyle’s rating Out Of 5

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You can read our review of Venom: Let There Be Carnage that appeared in The Phuket News here – https://www.thephuketnews.com/let-there-be-carnage-82175.php

Trailer:

Summary: 
Feature adaptation of Frank Herbert’s science fiction novel about the son of a noble family entrusted with the protection of the most valuable asset and most vital element in the galaxy.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates:  2nd December 2021 (Australia), 21st October 2021 (Thailand), 21st October 2021 (UK), 22nd October 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: USA, Canada

Director: Denis Villeneuve

Screenwriter: Jon Spaihts, Dennis Villeneuve, Eric Roth

Cast: Javier Bardem (Stilgar), Dave Bautista (Beast Rabban Harkonnen), Neil Bell (Sardaukar Bashar), Josh Brolin (Gurney Halleck), Timothee Chamalet (Paul Atreides), Chang Chen (Dr. Wellington Yueh), David Dastmalchian (Piter de Vries), Sharon Duncan-Brewster (Dr. Liet Kynes), Elmi Rashir Elmi (Shamir), Rebecca Ferguson (Lady Jessica Atreides), Stephn McKinley Henderson (Thufir Hawat), Oscar Isaac (Duke Leto Atreides), Jason Momoa (Duncan Idaho), Tachia Newall (Tanat), Babs Olusanmokun (Jamis), Charlotte Rampling (Reverend Mother Mohiam), Golda Rosheuvel (Shadout Mapes), Stellan Skarsgard (Baron Vladimir Harkonnen), Roger Yuan (Lietenant Lanville), Zendaya (Chani)

Running Time: 155 mins

Classification: M (Australia), 12A (UK), PG-13 (USA)

OUR DUNE REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Dune Review:

Dune has always felt really personal to me. I read the novel, by Frank Herbert, in my first year at High School and completely fell in love with it. I then made the mistake of watching the David Lynch film adaption, an adaption I loathed and Sting’s costume still haunts me to this day.

During my time at uni a friend suggested that I watch the mini-series and told me “that it was remarkably better than the film.” To her credit it was better but it never even went close to reaching the lofty expectations that I had in my head for what the world of Dune should look like since reading the novel.

So as you could imagine I was pretty nervous going in to watch the Denis Villeneuve (Blade Runner 2049) version. Actually perhaps nervous isn’t the right way to describe how I was feeling. To be honest I was trying not to feel excited because in the pit of my stomach I had a feeling that I was once again going to have hopes dashed. But, I am happy to say I was wrong, I was very wrong because Villeneuve has delivered a masterpiece.

For those who do not know the Dune story. It is told through the eyes of a young Duke-to-be, Paul Atreides (Timothee Chalamet – Lady Bird). He has watched his father, Duke Leto Atreides (Oscar Isaac – Ex Machina), build their family empire to make them one of the most respected families in the galaxy. With the likes of Gurney Halleck (Josh Brolin – Avengers: Endgame) and Duncan Idaho (Jason Momoa – Aquaman) training their Army they feel safe and secure.

Meanwhile both Gurney and Duncan train Paul in combat, in case there is ever a need for it, while his mother, Lady Jessica Atreides (Rebecca Ferguson – The Greatest Showman) trains him to saddle the special abilities that have been handed down to him through his family line. And while Paul attempts that those abilities are providing him of dreams and visions of Chani (Zendaya The Greatest Showman), a young native Fremen from the planet Arrakis.

Paul has no idea what the visions mean but is soon worried by them when he learns that the Atreides family have just been ordered to travel to Arrakis to bring peace to the planet and to stabilise and operate the ‘spice’ mining operation on the planet.

Villeneuve’s vision of Dune is nothing short of amazing. It is like he somehow went into my head and took my visions of what the Dune universe would look like and brought it to the screen. The first thing that hits you when watching Dune is the understanding of the themes and morals of the original novel that Villeneuve had the second is the fact that his film-making makes even the harshest scenes of the film look like a thing of beauty.

It was funny because when the credits were rolling after the screening the other night a stranger sitting next to me started to use a loud voice to say why he hated the film. I realised that every reason he said he hated the film was a reason why I loved it. He said he hated that it wasn’t like Star Wars – while I loved the fact that Villeneuve gave respect to the novel and didn’t decide to include cheesy ‘creatures’ or ridiculous one off lines.

The stranger said he didn’t like the fact that the film felt dark. Well of course it was dark, the themes explored in the film are not exactly something that you can make light. I was actually in awe of the way that the director kept a dark tone throughout the film without depressing his audience in a way that made the film a chore to watch. Talking of that the stranger also didn’t like that fact that he had to think during the film. Yes, he is right Villeneuve doesn’t spell out everything to the audience like they are dunces he makes you work at times to figure out what is happening and the result of that is you become so engrossed in the film itself that you feel like you are part of the universe alongside the characters at hand.

The power of this film really comes through the way that it looks on the big screen though. There is a dark, foreboding feeling that remains while the film throughout. Having said that though the film does reach epic heights that match the special moments of a film like Lord Of The Rings but there is an alternative feel to this film that allows for more character development then you would expect from a film of this magnitude, while Villeneuve never fails to remember one thing – at the heart of this film it is a coming-of-age story and even during epic battles etc the storyline of the film still remains a learning curve for Paul. I don’t say this very often about films that are supposed to be a spectacle or blockbuster. But this is truly a masterpiece and it shows that is okay to make a blockbuster film have an alternative edge to it. This is a film of true beauty and I cannot wait to revisit it again.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

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Trailer:

Summary: 
Charismatic rancher Phil Burbank inspires fear and awe in those around him. When his brother brings home a new wife and her son, Phil torments them until he finds himself exposed to the possibility of love.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates:  23rd November 2021 (Australia), 19th November 2021 (UK), 17th November 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: 1st December 2021 (Australia), 1st December 2021 (Thailand), 1st December 2021 (UK), 1st December 2021 (Thailand)

Country: USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, UK

Director: Jane Campion

Screenwriter: Jane Campion, Thomas Savage (novel)

Cast: Stephen Bain (Mr Weltz – the Undertaker), Adam Beach (Edward Nappo), Eddie Campbell (Stan), Alice May Connolly (Pearl), Benedict Cumberbatch (Phil Burbank), David Denis (Angelo), Jacque Drew (Jeannie), Kirsten Dunst (Rose Gordon), Alice Englert (Buster), Julie Forsyth (Mrs. Mueller), Aislinn Furlong (Evie), Cohon Holloway (Bobby), Ella Hope-Higginson (Consuela), Sean Keenan (Sven), Genevieve Lemon (Mrs. Lewis), George Mason (Cricket), Max Mata (Juan), Ramontay McConnell (Theo), Thomasin McKenzie (Lola), Piimio Mei (Sue Ella), Josh Owen (Lee), Yvette Parsons (Hettie), Jesse Plemons (George Burbank), Edith Poor (Tanya), Yvette Reid (Clementine), Alastair Sewell (Jock), Bryony Skillington (Queenie), Kodi Smit-McPhee (Peter Gordon), Tatum Warren-Ngata (Libby), Karl Willietts (Bill)

Running Time: 126 mins

Classification: M (Australia), 12A (UK), R (USA)

OUR THE POWER OF THE DOG REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ The Power Of The Dog Review:

Often the Western genre can produce some of the most powerful films you are ever likely to see. I can still remember marveling at the filmmaking prowess of Sergio Leone after watching Once Upon A Time In The West for the first time. Then there are modern-day classics like Meek’s Cutoff and The Assassination Of Jesse James By The Coward Robert Ford. Now we can add another film to that list – The Power Of The Dog.

Directed by Jane Campion (The Piano) The Power Of The Dog tells the story of two brothers Phil (Benedict Cumberbatch Doctor Strange) and George Burbank (Jesse Plemons – The Irishman) who have built themselves up from nothing to well-respected Montana ranch owners back in 1925.

But while George looks after fiancés and helps the ranch make a profit Phil leads the men who do the grunt work. Phil is also considered a rude and gruff enigma. College learned he threw away a promising future to focus on the work with the cattle and is now so anti-social even getting him to bathe is a chore.

His world is further interrupted when after a trip into town Phil marriages a local widower, Rose Gordon (Kirsten Dunst – Bring It On), and brings herself and her ‘strange’ son Peter (Kodi Smit-McPhee – The Road) back to the ranch. It is an awkward time as Phil has previously bullied Peter to the point where Rose is in tears and now he is jealous of the fact that George is out living his life.

The Power Of The Dog is a brilliant character piece that plays out like some of Shakespeare’s finest work. This is one film where as an audience member if you look away from the screen you are likely to miss an important piece of the puzzle that all comes together in the final moments of the film. Yes, this film has a haunting and powerful finale that is guaranteed to stay with you like some of the finest moments of cinema that you have ever seen. For once this year I was one of those people that just couldn’t get out of my chair even after the final credits had finished because I was just in total awe of what had just played out in front of me.

Campion’s screenplay brings Thomas Savage’s novel to life in a brutal yet beautiful way. Words are like weapons throughout the film while at times silence and glances can be just as harmful. Then there is the amazing cinematography of Ari Wegner (Lady Macbeth) that makes the harsh Montana landscape look like something that should be hanging in the Louvre.

Rounding out this perfect set-piece are the performances of the film’s leads. Benedict Cumberbatch reminds serious cinema lovers just how good he is in a role that requires pure acting talent while he is well-matched with Jesse Plemons who plays the awkward yet determined George to a tee. Grouped together with Melancholia this is some of Kirsten Dunst’s finest work while Kodi Smit-McPhee takes another huge step forward in his acting career by portraying the strange and maligned Peter in a way that should garnish some award nominations. The young actor seems right at home acting alongside such a stellar cast and many of his scenes with Cumberbatch are pure cinematic magic.The Power Of The Dog is what cinema should be about.

A brilliantly written script that keeps its audience guessing and in awe throughout and brought to the screen by the director that can turn even the harshest scene into a true brushstroke of beauty. Then to top it off throw in a cast that brings in hardened performances that knock the audience back into their seats. The Power Of The Dog doesn’t need epic special effects or gimmicks to impress the audience it does with pure cinematic gold. I don’t say this very often but to me this was close to the perfect film and it is one that I cannot wait to delve back into again as soon as I can.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

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