Tagged: Bill Nighy

 

Summary: In 1800s England, a well meaning but selfish young woman meddles in the love lives of her friends.

Year: 2020

Australian Cinema Release Date: 13th February 2020

Thailand Cinema Release Date: TBA

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United Kingdom

Director: Autumn de Wilde

Screenwriter: Eleanor Catton, Jane Austen (novel)

Cast: Amber Anderson (Jane Fairfax), Suzy Bloom (Miss Gilbert), Oliver Chris (John Knightley), Edward Davis (Charles), Johnny Flynn (George Knightley), Mia Goth (Harriet Smith), Rupert Graves (Mr. Weston), Isis Hainsworth (Elizabeth Martin), Miranda Hart (Miss Bates), Angus Imrie (Bartholomew), Myra McFadyen (Mrs. Bates), Bill Nighy (Mr. Woodhouse), Josh O’Connor (Mr. Elton), Vanessa M. Owen (Catherine Martin), Chloe Pierrie (Isabella Knightley), Tanya Reynolds (Mrs. Elton), Rose Shalloo (Hannah), Connor Swindells (Mr. Martin), Anya Taylor-Joy (Emma Woodhouse), Letty Thomas (Biddy), Callum Turner (Frank Churchill), Charlotte Weston (Mrs. Ford), Gemma Whelan (Mrs. Weston)

Running Time: 124 mins

Classification: PG (Australia)

 

 

OUR COLOR EMMA REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths’ Emma Review

It is funny when you are sitting in a group of film lovers and someone mentions that a film is about to be remade. There always seems to be a collective groan go up. The same thing happens when it is mentioned that a novel adaption is about to hit screens and it is a novel that has already had several versions adapted for cinema. I’m not one to buy into that though because as we have seen recently various filmmakers view the source material in different lights and that can sometimes lead to some very special variations.

Take Little Women for example. When Greta Gerwig announced that she was working on a film based on the much loved novel those groans were ever present, but the result was a film that most people had listed in their Top Ten lists at the end of the year, and a film good enough to even garnish Oscar nominations. As if to prove those who give the collective groan are very wrong now we welcome director Autumn de Wilde’s (The Postman Dreams) take on the classic Jane Austin novel Emma into the cinemas… and I am happy to say that this is a delightfully fresh re-imagining.

The film doesn’t stray too far from the source material. Living in Victorian times Emma Woodhouse (Anya Taylor-Joy – Split) is as close to perfection as one can get. She spends her days looking after her pessimistic father, the wealthy Mr Woodhouse (Bill Nighy – Love Actually), her night conversing with one of her best friends George Knightley (Johnny Flynn – Beast), and pretty much all the time helping out female friends like Harriet Smith (Mia Goth – Suspiria) with their love lives.

So well regarded is Emma that it seems that people take her advice as gospel but as the film goes on we learn that her advice is not always perfect and can accidentally lead to paths of pain while at the same time the arrival of the handsome enigma Frank Churchill (Callum Turner – Green Room) has many locals predicting that it is finally Emma’s turn to be romanced… a notion that strikes fear into her father’s heart.

There are a lot of different ways that de Wilde could have sculptured this film. It could have been an epic romance where the characters swooned over each other constantly like a Mills & Boon novel, or even an intense drama with characters flashing each other steely glares in between wailing and shouting matches. Instead de Wilde, alongside screenwriter Eleanor Cotton (The Luminaries), has delivered a lighter version of the story with moments of true comedy.

That decision could have been thwart with danger. Comedy is one of the hardest genres to ever pull off, especially in this time when it feels that what can be and can’t be laughed at changes from day-to-day. However, what de Wilde and Cotton have created here is a beautifully light film with impeccable comedic timing and lines. In other words this is an enjoyable film that will actually make you laugh throughout while never straying into that over-the-top type of comedy that we saw with The Favourite.

Of course the film is not all about laughter. Yes Bill Nighy manages to steal the odd laugh here and there but Cotton’s screenplay does still deliver a lot of the drama that made Austen’s novel such a best seller. If you’ve had the chance to read the source material then the film is going to throw up a couple of curve-balls that will truly stun you, while the film also provides enough characterisation to see the audience divided into Team Knightley and Team Churchill when it comes to the men that could possibly sweep Emma off her feet.

So natural is the way that the film plays it that it also allows its cast to shine. It is a joy watching Anya Taylor-Joy in a role away from the more hardcore roles that she seems to gravitate to. Here we see a well-rounded performance that shows that she is talented enough to be able to tackle any genre of film she sets her mind to. Likewise Johnny Flynn shows why he can easily become one of Hollywood’s leading men, and I’d be lying if I didn’t say that I found myself on Team Knightley pretty early on. Then there are Bill Nighy and Josh O’Connor (Cinderella) who manage to steal scenes with great comedic timing, both produce brilliant performances to the point where at times O’Connor only has to appear on the screen to have the audience start to snigger.

Emma is the kind of film that will take its audience through a range of emotions. You will laugh and some may cry but everyone will leave the cinema knowing they have watched a delightfully entertaining film that goes far beyond what anyone would have expected from it.

 

 

 

 

 

Kyle McGrath’s Emma Review

 

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:

 

 

 

IMDB Rating: 
Emma. (2020) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Emma Reviews: N/A

Trailer:

Pride

Summary: U.K. gay activists work to help miners during their lengthy strike of the National Union of Mineworkers in the summer of 1984.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 30th October, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: 4th March, 2015

Country: UK, France

Director: Matthew Warchus

Screenwriter: Stephen Beresford

Cast: Jack Baggs (Gary), Derek Barr (Brian), Jessie Cave (Zoe), Paddy Considine (Dai), Monica Dolan (Marion), Dyfan Dwyfor (Lee), Mary-Anne Dymond (Rowena), Sophie Evans (Debbie), Karina Fernandez (Stella), Matthew Flynn (Tony), Freddie Fox (Jeff), Johnny Gibbon (Johnny), Joseph Gilgun (Mike), Jessica Gunning (Sian), Nia Gwynne (Gail), Joshua Hill (Ray), Jan Leeming (herself), George MacKay (Joe), Faye Marsay (Steph), Laura Matthews (Tina), Rhodri Meilir (Martin), Jordan Metcalfe (Charlie), Bill Nighy (Cliff), Chris Overton (Reggie), Lisa Palfrey (Maureen), Bryan Parry (Kevin), Feargal Quinn (Jimmy Sommerville), Kyle Rees (Carl), Ben Schnetzer (Mark), Andrew Scott (Gethin), Lee Shepherd (Rhodri), Imelda Staunton (Hefina), Margaret Thatcher (herself), Russell Tovey (Tim), Menna Trussler (Gwen), Dominic West (Jonathan), Liz White (Margaret), Richard Whiteley (himself), Joseph Wilkins (Jason)

Runtime: 120 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR PRIDE REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Harley Woods:

Pride is a film based in semi-recent history. The screenplay was written by Stephen Beresford and the film directed by Matthew Warchus.

The story revolves around the miners’ strike in Britain in 1984 and the persecution the mineworkers suffered at the hands of the Thatcher government and the police. Contrasting this is the gay rights movement in London and one gay activist group’s plan to take action and help out another disaffected group of people by raising funds for the mineworkers and their families.

The picture and the place-and-time are set instantly to recreate the Eighties and archive news footage shows us the situations going on with each of the main groups. To take us into this world we meet Joe (George MacKay), affectionately nicknamed “Bromley” after his hometown, on his twentieth birthday – which just happens to be gay pride day. Suddenly inspired to march he joins in with the gay pride activists, hoping to ‘blend in’. Instead, he gets thrust into the limelight, holding a sign for attention. He soon joins in gathering funds for the miners as established activist, Mark (Ben Schnetzer), takes up the cause. From there the LGSM (Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners) movement is born and we are thrust into the main story.

On his journey, as is paralleled by the main plot, Joe finds his identity, new friendships, belonging and a cause. His awkwardness echoes the awkwardness between the two antithetical communities as they band together.

Differing opinions within each group show the difficulty of the merger and of dealing with people’s uneducated phobias, but clever humour is used to lighten the tension and resolve issues in an entertaining fashion. A witty play on the stereotypes and expected ‘ignorance’ is used to effect to make things entertaining and take things out of predictable realms.

The personal stories of some of our characters show us the effects that the mineworkers’ situation and the fight for gay rights have on those affected. These human insights give us an emotional connection and draw us further into the plot. We see the fight for survival, the AIDS epidemic – the character of Jonathan Blake was the second-diagnosed person with HIV in London, but is still living strong to this day – self-identity, coming-out and acceptance by your family and those you love.

Gethin, our gay Welsh character, bridges the gap between the two worlds and adds a human expression with his feelings of being unable to return home after being rejected by his mother. As the two camps come together he is finally moved to take-part in the union and humour is used to make light of his awkwardness; breaking in a scene that shows how they are all growing comfortable with each other.

The human element is at the core of the story. We follow this in Joe’s first-gay-steps, his first kiss, his outing to his family… Conversely, we see Maureen’s (Lisa Palfrey) bigotry and how this affects her actions to further her own agenda and to shield her sons from something she has misunderstood. We see the desperation of the mining families in a scene where two of the characters butter bread for sandwiches that have no other fillings. The clever humour is used to show a serious situation in a very accessible way.

Detail has gone into design, set-dressing and wardrobe to set the period perfectly. The colour of the Eighties shapes the London scenes and the grey of the Welsh mining town of Onllwyn. The crazy colour of the period is nicely toned and selected in deliberate pallets in all aspects to keep the visuals pleasant. The grading of the colours are muted more at the start of the film and become bright and bold at the end, subliminally showing a ‘brighter future.’

The story shows the characters at their best and worst and what they take from it all, making for a very engaging and powerful story. We see how the story gets turned around at the end and how far the two communities have come to support each other. We see the power that comes from people coming together; even if not all major battles are won, the amazing feats of people uniting under a common cause has the power to change things, even in small ways and this has a compounding effect. We even get to glimpse the ‘changed hearts’ of Maureen’s sons are they are there to support the gay community at the end, having overcome their own misinformed cynicisms.

Exceptional performances from the whole cast brought the characters to life. Of note was Jessica Gunning as Sian who really ‘comes-out’ in her own right; taking what she has learnt to further herself and eventually became a member of parliament.

Stars(4.5)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(4.5)

 

IMDB Rating:  Pride (2014) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Reviews of ‘Pride′: For our full Pride review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #103.

Trailer:

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show

This week on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Nick, Adam, Dave and Greg take a look at new release films ‘Cuban Fury’, ‘Pompeii’, ‘Wadjda’, ‘Rise Of The Eco Warriors’, ‘Ride Along’ and ‘I, Frankenstein’. This episode also features interviews with Kevin Hart, Ice Cube, Aaron Eckhart, Bill Nighy, Miranda Otto, Emily Browning and Kit Harrington. We also launch new competitions for ‘Cuban Fury’ and ‘Pompeii’.

To listen to the show you can download it for free from our Podcast Channel – Listen/Download here

The World's End

A new featurette has just been released for the forthcoming ‘The World’s End’

Five friends who reunite in an attempt to top their epic pub crawl from 20 years earlier unwittingly become humankind’s only hope for survival.

Cast:
Rosamund Pike, Simon Pegg, Martin Freeman, Bill Nighy, Pierce Brosnan, Eddie Marsan, Nick Frost, Paddy Considine

Director:
Edgar Wright

Jack The Giant Slayer

Summary: Jack the Giant Slayer tells the story of an ancient war that is reignited when a young farmhand unwittingly opens a gateway between our world and a fearsome race of giants. Unleashed on the Earth for the first time in centuries, the giants strive to reclaim the land they once lost, forcing the young man, Jack (Nicholas Hoult) into the battle of his life to stop them. Fighting for a kingdom, its people, and the love of a brave princess, he comes face to face with the unstoppable warriors he thought only existed in legend – and gets the chance to become a legend himself.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 21st March, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Bryan Singer

Screenwriter: Darren Lemke, Christopher McQuarrie, Dan Studney, David Dobkin (story)

Cast: Angus Barnett (Foe), Lee Boardman (Badger), Ewen Bremner (Wicke), Andrew Brooke (Fye), Ralph Brown (General Entin), Ben Daniels (Fumm), Warwick Davis (Old Hamm), Christopher Fairbank (Jack’s Uncle), Nicholas Hoult (Jack), Cornell John (Fee), Mingis Johnston (Bald), Simon Lowe (Monk), Eddie Marsan (Crawe), Ewan McGregor (Elmont), Ian McShane (King Brahmwell), Bill Nighy (General Fallon), Sydney Rawson (Young Isabelle), Joe E Salazar (Roddy), Craig Salisbury (Panto Erik The Great),  Michael Self (Young Jack), Eleanor Tomlinson (Isabelle), Stanley Tucci (Roderick), Tandi Wright (Queen)

Runtime: 114 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Jack The Giant Slayer’ Review: Please check Dave’s review of ‘Rust & Bone’ that is available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Jack The Giant Slayer′: Check Episode #25 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Jack The Giant Slayer’. Subculture Media also have interviews with the cast of Jack The Giant Slayer available for you to listen to.

Subculture Media Interviews for ‘Jack The Giant Slayer’: Interviews with various members of the ‘Jack The Giant Slayer’ cast can be found here.

Rating: 3.5/5

IMDB Rating: Jack the Giant Slayer (2013) on IMDb

Summary:A factory worker, Douglas Quaid, begins to suspect that he is a spy after visiting Rekall – a company that provides its clients with implanted fake memories of a life they would like to have led – goes wrong and he finds himself on the run.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 23rd August, 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: 20th December, 2012

Country: United States/Canada

Director: Len Wiseman

Screenwriter: Mark Bomback, Philip K. Dick (short story), Dan O’Bannon, Jon Povil, Ronald Shusett, Kurt Wimmer

Cast: Kate Beckinsale (Lori Quaid), Jessica Biel (Melina), Emily Chang (Newscaster Lien Nguyen), John Cho (McClane), Bryan Cranston (Cohaagen), Colin Farrell (Douglas Quaid/Carl Hauser), Will Yun Lee (Marek), Bill Nighy (Matthias), Simon Sinn (Murray), Dylan Smith (Hammond), Bokeem Woodbine (Harry)

Runtime: 113 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Total Recall’ Review:

It seems most sci-fi fans are worried that the 2012 remake of Total Recall will be nothing like the original because it doesn’t have Arnie. Perhaps what they should be more worried about is the fact that the remake doesn’t seem to have a soul. Changes are most cinema goers will be won over by its sleek production design but if they dig a little further they’ll soon realise that this film has as much heart as the Tinman.

Total Recall is set in the future at a time when the Earth only has two countries fit for habitat, The Colony (Australia) and The United Federation of Britain. The two ‘colonies’ are on the brink of war with each other with Chancellor Cohaagen (Bryan Cranston – Rock Of Ages, TV’S Breaking Bad) from the UFB claiming that Matthias (Bill Nighy – Wrath Of The Titans, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel) from the Colony is a terrorist hell-bent on destruction. In the middle of the disagreement are people such as Douglas Quaid (Colin Farrell – Fright Night, Horrible Bosses) a factory worker who travels from the Colony through the Earth to the UFB for work each day.

Quaid’s mundane life with his wife Lori (Kate Beckinsale – Underworld: Awakening, Contraband) soon gets a jolt of it’s own however as he tries to find some meaning for his life by going to a place called Rekall (despite advice from his best friend Harry (Bokeem Woodbine – Letting Go, TV’S Southland) not to), a centre that provides memories for a cost. Quaid’s attempt soon sees him being accused of being a spy and then being hunted down by his wife while being helped by the mysterious freedom-fighter Melina (Jessica Biel – The Tall Man, New Years Eve).

Director Len Wiseman (Die Hard 4.0, Underworld: Evolution) does a great job making this film look good. He goes for the similar always raining, always dreary look that he did so well with the Underworld franchise. He also directs the fight scenes in the same Underworld style, Kate Beckinsale’s groin take-down of Colin Farrell is a ripper, but it does feel that Wiseman is the only one lifting his weight.

The production design team seem to have been doing a lot of DVD watching because they have ‘borrowed’ a stack of things from Star Wars: The Phantom Menace, Blade Runner and The Fifth Element while the quite large script writing team did no service to Philip K. Dick’s short story at all. Instead of having the audience in suspense over whether the events that are occurring on screen are really happening or are just part of Douglas’s Rekall experience the script literally screams “THIS IS REALLY HAPPENING, YES IT IS!!!” while Lori may be set up as a top notch cop but most of the time throughout the film she seems inept at her job and seems to mutter ‘shit’ hell of a lot.

The poor actors really had very little to work with at all. Beckinsale’s talents are completely wasted while poor Jessica Biel’s character of Melina had no characterization whatsoever, despite the fact she is one of the film’s most important characters. The only member of the cast to get anything out of Total Recall at all was Colin Farrell who at last got the opportunity to remind the world that he is an action hero who is capable of delivering dramatic lines… sadly cheesy ones seem to outnumber his dramatic ones here though.

Total Recall does win you over with its great visuals but the fact it has no substance will most likely mean you won’t be watching it over and over.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of Total Recall: http://www.helium.com/items/2366190-movie-reviews-total-recall-2012.

Rating: 2.5/5 Stars

IMDB Rating:Total Recall (2012) on IMDb

Wrath Of The Titans

Summary: Perseus braves the treacherous underworld to rescue his father, Zeus, captured by his son, Ares, and brother Hades who unleash the ancient Titans upon the world.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 29th March, 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: 21st August, 2012

Country: USA, Spain

Director: Jonathan Liebesman

Screenwriter: Dan Mazeau, David Johnson, Greg Berlanti (story), Beverley Cross (1981 screenplay)

Cast: John Bell (Helius), Kathryn Carpenter (Athena), Sinead Cusack (Clea), Freddy Drabble (Apollo), Ralph Fiennes (Hades), Lamberto Guerra (Timon), Jorge Guimera (Theodulus), Danny Huston (Poseidon), Lily James (Korrina), Toby Kebbell (Agenor), Asier Macazaga (Theron), Alejandro Naranjo (Mantius), Liam Neeson (Zeus), Bill Nighy (Hephaestus), Rosamund Pike (Andromeda), Edgar Ramirez (Ares), Daniel Galindo Rojas (Eustachius), Sam Worthington (Perseus)

Runtime: 99 mins

Classification:M

 OUR WRATH OF THE TITANS REVIEWS & RATINGS

Adam Ross: Stars(2)

Please check Adam’s Wrath of The Titans review of that is available on The Crat

Greg King: Stars(1.5)

Please check Greg’s Wrath of The Titans review of that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

David Griffiths:

Dave’s review from Entertainment Scene 360

Wrath Of The Titans is very much a ‘guilty pleasure’ film. There isn’t much substance in the actual storyline and the acting standard is far from what you would describe as great, yet alone likely to ever warrant the attention of awards or nominations, yet there is something strangely alluring and enjoyable about a film that is set to become an action favourite.

If you haven’t seen Clash Of The Titans it is highly recommended you give it a watch before you sit down to watch Wrath Of The Titans as the screenwriters haven’t given great detail in setting up characterisation. In fact if you can’t remember what happened, or the status of the relationship, between Perseus (Sam Worthington) and Zeus (Liam Neeson) then you certainly need to do a Clash Of The Titans refresher because while it is mentioned a couple of times this time around (and is an important part of the story) it is never fully explained.

This time around sees Perseus trying to forget about his heritage and events of the past by living as a humble fisherman in a small village while protecting his son. It’s not only Persues’ life that has completely changed, the whole world has. No longer do regular citizens turn to the Gods in prayer or sacrifice and as a result all the Gods, even the mighty Zeus, have weakened in power.

The world is turned even darker when Zeus’s sons Ares (Edgar Ramirez) and Hades (Ralph Fiennes) join forces in a bid to release a sinister force. It is then up to Perseus to reluctantly team up with Agenor (Toby Kebbell) and Andromeda (Rosamund Pike) and try to stop the force from destroying the Earth.

Much of the fact that the film stands up is thanks to director, Jonathan Liebesman. Liebesman proved with World Invasion: Battle L.A. that he can turn an ordinary action script to a good looking flashy film on the big screen, and with Wrath Of The Titans he certainly does that. He manages to let the audience forget that there is a weak (at best) storyline and very little characterization by blowing their socks off with some amazing action sequences that for once actually allows you to keep track of who-is-who during ‘busy’ action sequences.

People planning on seeing Wrath Of The Titans in Imax 3D should be warned that some of the action scenes don’t work so well in this format. Often, the vision on the screen becomes blurred which is both annoying and distracting when you are trying to keep track of what is happening.

It is good that Liebesman brings his A-game to the film because many other people involved certainly don’t. The usually good Liam Neeson breezes his way through the film (being tied up for most of the film certainly doesn’t help his acting range), while even Sam Worthington who has proved his worth in countless Australian films as well as Hollywood blockbusters such as Man On A Ledge and Avatar seems to just cruise his way through Wrath Of The Titans. He doesn’t even bother hiding  his Australian accent which sounds extremely out of place as he roams around Ancient Greece.

Wrath Of The Titans certainly isn’t a great film. Its storyline and acting seriously lets it down but if you enjoy big blockbusters that are non-stop action you’ll still find yourself in movie nirvana.

 

Dave’s review from Buzz Magazine

Stone me, shoot me, hang me even, but I have to admit that Wrath Of The Titans did entertain me. Yes there were a more than a few things wrong with it, especially if you are watching the IMAX conversion, but I was entertained for the entire film, which I’m pretty sure was the film’s aim.

Wrath Of The Titans picks up with Perseus (Sam Worthington – Man On A Ledge, The Dark Fields) trying to put his past and heritage behind him and work as a humble fisherman while protecting his son. However, around him the world is in shambles, the Gods are almost forgotten to the point where even the once mighty Zeus (Liam Neeson – The Grey, Unknown) has been weakened due to the lack of prayer.

But then things turn ever darker when Zeus is taken captive by his son, Ares (Edgar Ramirez – Saluda Al Diablo De Mi Parte, Carlos) and brother, Hades (Ralph Fiennes – Harry Potter & The Deathly Hallows Part 2, Coriolanus) as they attempt to release a sinister force.

Perseus then realises that in order to make the world a safe place for his son he will have to reluctantly team up with Agenor (Toby Kebbell – War Horse, The Veteran) and Andromeda (Rosamund Pike – Devil You Know, The Big Year) to stop the evil plan from destroying the world.

The thing that makes Wrath Of The Titans so damn enjoyable is that director, Jonathan Liebesman (Battle L.A., The Killing Room) knows how to shoot action scenes that make the audience go wow, and with a film like Wrath Of The Titans that is all you really want. I’m willing to overlook a somewhat weak script, the fact that at times the IMAX conversion is very blurry and even the fact that Perseus has an Australian accent so thick it would make Crocodile Dundee flush because at the end of the day I wanted this film to entertain me and it did that to a T.

I can’t stress highly enough though that this isn’t a film to see at IMAX. If anything did distract me from the brilliant action sequences it was the fact that in 3D at IMAX something of them look very blurry indeed, in fact it looked the same with the glasses on or off.

When its comes to casting the guys behind Wrath Of The Titans got it right. Worthington’s accent may become annoying at times, but the guy can act and looks good when fighting his away across ancient Greece. The only annoying thing is that it seems Liam Neeson is wasted in a role that seems him strapped to giant rocks for nearly three quarters of the film.

Wrath Of The Titans delivers exactly what you expect from an action film. A basic storyline, limited acting performances and scenes that will blow you out of your seat. A visual nirvana for action films.

Stars(3)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(2)

IMDB Rating: Wrath of the Titans (2012) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Wrath Of The Titans′: Nil.

Trailer: