Tagged: Dominic West

Tomb Raider Poster

Warner Bros. have given us the first glimpses of the new Tomb Raider film overnight with the release of not only the film’s first trailer but with a special Becoming Lara Croft featurette as well.

Lara Croft is the fiercely independent daughter of an eccentric adventurer who vanished when she was scarcely a teen. Now a young woman of 21 without any real focus or purpose, Lara navigates the chaotic streets of trendy East London as a bike courier, barely making the rent, and takes college courses, rarely making it to class. Determined to forge her own path, she refuses to take the reins of her father’s global empire just as staunchly as she rejects the idea that he’s truly gone. Advised to face the facts and move forward after seven years without him, even Lara can’t understand what drives her to finally solve the puzzle of his mysterious death.
Going explicitly against his final wishes, she leaves everything she knows behind in search of her dad’s last-known destination: a fabled tomb on a mythical island that might be somewhere off the coast of Japan. But her mission will not be an easy one; just reaching the island will be extremely treacherous. Suddenly, the stakes couldn’t be higher for Lara, who—against the odds and armed with only her sharp mind, blind faith and inherently stubborn spirit—must learn to push herself beyond her limits as she journeys into the unknown. If she survives this perilous adventure, it could be the making of her, earning her the name tomb raider.

TOMB RAIDER is directed by Roar Uthaug and stars Oscar winner Alicia Vikander in the lead role, Dominic West, Walton Goggins and Daniel Wu.

TOMB RAIDER releases in Australian cinemas on March 15, 2018.

Pride

Summary: U.K. gay activists work to help miners during their lengthy strike of the National Union of Mineworkers in the summer of 1984.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 30th October, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: 4th March, 2015

Country: UK, France

Director: Matthew Warchus

Screenwriter: Stephen Beresford

Cast: Jack Baggs (Gary), Derek Barr (Brian), Jessie Cave (Zoe), Paddy Considine (Dai), Monica Dolan (Marion), Dyfan Dwyfor (Lee), Mary-Anne Dymond (Rowena), Sophie Evans (Debbie), Karina Fernandez (Stella), Matthew Flynn (Tony), Freddie Fox (Jeff), Johnny Gibbon (Johnny), Joseph Gilgun (Mike), Jessica Gunning (Sian), Nia Gwynne (Gail), Joshua Hill (Ray), Jan Leeming (herself), George MacKay (Joe), Faye Marsay (Steph), Laura Matthews (Tina), Rhodri Meilir (Martin), Jordan Metcalfe (Charlie), Bill Nighy (Cliff), Chris Overton (Reggie), Lisa Palfrey (Maureen), Bryan Parry (Kevin), Feargal Quinn (Jimmy Sommerville), Kyle Rees (Carl), Ben Schnetzer (Mark), Andrew Scott (Gethin), Lee Shepherd (Rhodri), Imelda Staunton (Hefina), Margaret Thatcher (herself), Russell Tovey (Tim), Menna Trussler (Gwen), Dominic West (Jonathan), Liz White (Margaret), Richard Whiteley (himself), Joseph Wilkins (Jason)

Runtime: 120 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR PRIDE REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Harley Woods:

Pride is a film based in semi-recent history. The screenplay was written by Stephen Beresford and the film directed by Matthew Warchus.

The story revolves around the miners’ strike in Britain in 1984 and the persecution the mineworkers suffered at the hands of the Thatcher government and the police. Contrasting this is the gay rights movement in London and one gay activist group’s plan to take action and help out another disaffected group of people by raising funds for the mineworkers and their families.

The picture and the place-and-time are set instantly to recreate the Eighties and archive news footage shows us the situations going on with each of the main groups. To take us into this world we meet Joe (George MacKay), affectionately nicknamed “Bromley” after his hometown, on his twentieth birthday – which just happens to be gay pride day. Suddenly inspired to march he joins in with the gay pride activists, hoping to ‘blend in’. Instead, he gets thrust into the limelight, holding a sign for attention. He soon joins in gathering funds for the miners as established activist, Mark (Ben Schnetzer), takes up the cause. From there the LGSM (Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners) movement is born and we are thrust into the main story.

On his journey, as is paralleled by the main plot, Joe finds his identity, new friendships, belonging and a cause. His awkwardness echoes the awkwardness between the two antithetical communities as they band together.

Differing opinions within each group show the difficulty of the merger and of dealing with people’s uneducated phobias, but clever humour is used to lighten the tension and resolve issues in an entertaining fashion. A witty play on the stereotypes and expected ‘ignorance’ is used to effect to make things entertaining and take things out of predictable realms.

The personal stories of some of our characters show us the effects that the mineworkers’ situation and the fight for gay rights have on those affected. These human insights give us an emotional connection and draw us further into the plot. We see the fight for survival, the AIDS epidemic – the character of Jonathan Blake was the second-diagnosed person with HIV in London, but is still living strong to this day – self-identity, coming-out and acceptance by your family and those you love.

Gethin, our gay Welsh character, bridges the gap between the two worlds and adds a human expression with his feelings of being unable to return home after being rejected by his mother. As the two camps come together he is finally moved to take-part in the union and humour is used to make light of his awkwardness; breaking in a scene that shows how they are all growing comfortable with each other.

The human element is at the core of the story. We follow this in Joe’s first-gay-steps, his first kiss, his outing to his family… Conversely, we see Maureen’s (Lisa Palfrey) bigotry and how this affects her actions to further her own agenda and to shield her sons from something she has misunderstood. We see the desperation of the mining families in a scene where two of the characters butter bread for sandwiches that have no other fillings. The clever humour is used to show a serious situation in a very accessible way.

Detail has gone into design, set-dressing and wardrobe to set the period perfectly. The colour of the Eighties shapes the London scenes and the grey of the Welsh mining town of Onllwyn. The crazy colour of the period is nicely toned and selected in deliberate pallets in all aspects to keep the visuals pleasant. The grading of the colours are muted more at the start of the film and become bright and bold at the end, subliminally showing a ‘brighter future.’

The story shows the characters at their best and worst and what they take from it all, making for a very engaging and powerful story. We see how the story gets turned around at the end and how far the two communities have come to support each other. We see the power that comes from people coming together; even if not all major battles are won, the amazing feats of people uniting under a common cause has the power to change things, even in small ways and this has a compounding effect. We even get to glimpse the ‘changed hearts’ of Maureen’s sons are they are there to support the gay community at the end, having overcome their own misinformed cynicisms.

Exceptional performances from the whole cast brought the characters to life. Of note was Jessica Gunning as Sian who really ‘comes-out’ in her own right; taking what she has learnt to further herself and eventually became a member of parliament.

Stars(4.5)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(4.5)

 

IMDB Rating:  Pride (2014) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Reviews of ‘Pride′: For our full Pride review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #103.

Trailer:

Testament Of Youth

Summary: Based on the popular novel of the same name Testament Of Youth is a coming of age story that follows Vera Brittain (Alicia Vikander), a young girl growing up as England heads into World War I. Before the War Vera’s biggest problem is trying to get into university to study literature during a period when a woman’s studies were considered a waste of time.

Upon getting into University though Vera learns that the war is beginning to spread across Europe. Soon she finds herself right in the middle of it as her brother, Edward (Taron Egerton), her fiancé Roland Leighton (Kit Harington) and best friends Geoffrey Thurlow (Jonathan Bailey) and Victor Richardson (Colin Morgan) are all sent off to Europe to serve. As the stories coming from the frontline get worse and worse Vera decides to put her studies on hold and instead become a volunteer nurse.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 23rd April, 2015

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United Kingdom

Director: James Kent

Screenwriter: Juliette Towhidi, Vera Brittain (autobiography)

Cast: Hayley Atwell (Hope), Jonathan Bailey (Geoffrey Thurlow), Anna Chancellor (Mrs. Leighton), Taron Egerton (Edward Brittain), Laura Elsworthy (Nurse Scott), Henry Garrett (George Catlin), Kit Harington (Roland Leighton), Alison Harris (Vad), Charlotte Hope (Betty), Colin Morgan (Victor Richardson), Jenn Murray (Dorothy), Miranda Richardson (Miss Lorimer), Alexandra Roach (Winifred Holtby), Joanna Scanlon (Aunt Belle), Branwen Summers (Vad), Julie Vollono (Mrs. Ellinger), Daisy Waterstone (Clare Leighton), Emily Watson (Mrs. Brittain), Dominic West (Mr. Brittain), Barney White (Billy), Alicia Vikander (Vera Brittian)

Runtime: 129 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR TESTAMENT OF YOUTH REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

Every now and then a film comes along that leaves you thinking ‘wow… just wow.’ In the time of special effects and CGI it’s normally been something epic happening on the screen that causes that response. Sadly, it is rarely a film that totally engrosses you in both its visual beauty and immersing storyline. But that is where Testament Of Youth comes to its fore… this is a film that will stick with its audience for a long, long time to come.

While many films often lack the ‘feel’ of the novel they are based here screenwriter Juliette Towhidi (who recently also showed her skills on Love, Rosie) manages to capture all of the teenage angst and anger that the real Vera Brittain wrote in her autobiography. For once a screenwriter read the novel they were adapting and understood exactly what the writer was trying to get across to their audience. Testament Of Youth is anti-war but it is a film that is supposed to show how important it was that men did die during the conflict and also graphically depicts why war is such a nasty affair for the people left behind.

What stands Testmant Of Youth apart from the many other films that have tried to show the horrors of war is the creative styling of director James Kent and veteran television director who is at the helm of his feature film. Kent brings a real beauty with this film working with his cinematographer in such a way that at times the images on the screen feel like you are looking at paintings. Even the most hardened emotionally draining scene seems to have an air of beauty around it with Kent in the director’s chair. Perhaps what shows his skills the most though is the fact that this is a film that is able to depict the horrors of war without ever actually showing a battle. The scenes of soldiers with limbs blown off or suffering from battle shock grouped together by something as simple as a father scouring the list of war dead in the newspaper does more than enough to show the audience how evil war can be without an overly graphic battle sequence.

Having heaped praise on the film though it is only fair to warn cinema goers that Testament Of Youth is not a film that is going to be enjoyed by all. The film is slow in pace and if films like Atonement have had you snoring then it is likely you won’t be a fan of this film either. Still the positives of this film largely outweigh the negatives and the fact that this film delivers such a powerful message about subjects as deep as feminism and the horrors of war without ever feeling that it has become bogged down just shows how talented the team of filmmakers behind it really are.

Also making Testament Of Youth a must see are the performances of its cast. Taron Egerton (who most would remember from Kingsmen: The Secret Service) and Kit Harington (yes Jon Snow from Game Of Thrones) put in such great performances that they are both virtually unrecognizable in their roles. Both show that they have the acting ability to go far beyond the roles that made them household names. But the strongest performance here comes from Alicia Vikander, an actress who has been on nearly everybody’s ‘star on the rise’ list since her performance in Anna Karenina. Her Vikander out performs her age and shows that she deserves to mentioned as one of the best young actresses in the industry at the moment. With Testament Of Youth she easily overcomes everything thrown at her and delivers a emotionally powerful performance that helps make this one of the films of the year.

Next time somebody says that there are no great films made any more point them in the direction of Testament Of Youth. This powerful film delivers a strong message about war while also making the audience wish that James Kent had turned his hand to directing features a lot earlier in his career. The beauty of this film is hard to describe in words but it is enough to show that Kent is one director that has been underestimated over the years. Aided by some amazing cinematography and an outstanding acting performance by Alicia Vikander Kent has helped create a film that is worthy of five stars.

 

Stars(5)

 

 

 

Greg King:

You can hear Greg’s full Testament Of Youth review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #126

 

Stars(3)

 

 

Nick Gardener:

You can hear Nick’s full Testament Of Youth review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #126

 

Stars(3)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3.5)

 

IMDB Rating: Testament of Youth (2014) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Testament Of Youth reviews: You will also be able to hear our Testament Of Youth review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #126. You can also read our Testament Of Youth review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

Golden Globe Awards

The 2015 Golden Globes nominations are now in… here they are.

BEST MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

Boyhood

Selma

The Imitation Game

Foxcatcher

The Theory Of Everything

BEST MOTION PICTURE – MUSICAL OR COMEDY

Birdman

The Grand Budapest Hotel

St. Vincent

Into The Woods

Pride

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

Steve Carell (Foxcatcher)

Benedict Cumberbatch (The Imitation Game)

Jake Gyllenhaal (Nightcrawler)

Eddie Redmayne (The Theory Of Everything)

David Oyelowo (Selma)

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

Jennifer Aniston (Cake)

Julianne Moore (Still Alice)

Rosamund Pike (Gone Girl)

Reese Witherspoon (Wild)

Felicity Jones (The Theory Of Everything)

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – MUSICAL OR COMEDY

Michael Keaton (Birdman)

Ralph Fiennes (The Grand Budapest Hotel)

Christoph Waltz (Big Eyes)

Bill Murray (St. Vincent)

Joaquin Phoenix (Inherent Vice)

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – MUSICAL OR COMEDY

Amy Adams (Big Eyes)

Emily Blunt (Into The Woods)

Julianne Moore (Maps To The Stars)

Helen Mirren (The Hundred Foot Journey)

Quvenzhane Wallis (Annie)

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE

Mark Ruffalo (Foxcatcher)

Ethan Hawke (Boyhood)

J.K. Simmons (Whiplash)

Robert Duvall (The Judge)

Edward Norton (Birdman)

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE

Patricia Arquette (Boyhood)

Keira Knightley (The Imitation Game)

Emma Stone (Birdman)

Meryl Streep (Into The Woods)

Jessica Chastain (A Most Violent Year)

BEST DIRECTOR – MOTION PICTURE

Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu (Birdman)

Richard Linklater (Boyhood)

Ava DuVernay (Selma)

David Fincher (Gone Girl)

Wes Anderson (The Grand Budapest Hotel)

BEST SCREENPLAY – MOTION PICTURE

Boyhood

Birdman

Gone Girl

The Imitation Game

The Grand Budapest Hotel

BEST ORIGINAL SONG – MOTION PICTURE

Big Eyes by Lana Del Ray (Big Eyes)

Glory by John Legend & Common (Selma)

Mercy Is by Patty Smith & Lenny Kaye (Noah)

Opportunity by Sia (Annie)

Yellow Flicker Beat by Lorde (The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1)

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE – MOTION PICTURE

Alexandre Desplat (The Imitation Game)

Johann Johannsson (The Theory Of Everything)

Trent Reznor (Gone Girl)

Antonio Sanchez (Birdman)

Hans Zimmer (Intersteallar)

BEST ANIMATED FILM

The Book Of Life

The Boxtrolls

Big Hero 6

How To Train Your Dragon 2

The Lego Movie

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

Ida

Leviathan

Force Majeure

Gett: The Trial Of Viviane Amsalem

Tangerines

BEST TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

Downton Abbey

The Good Wife

House Of Cards

Game Of Thrones

The Affair

BEST TELEVISION SERIES – MUSICAL OR COMEDY

Girls

Orange In The New Black

Transparent

Silicon Valley

Jane The Virgin

BEST MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

Olive Kitteridge

True Detective

Fargo

The Missing

The Normal Heart

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

Kevin Spacey (House Of Cards)

Liev Schreiber (Ray Donovan)

James Spader (The Blacklist)

Dominic West (The Affair)

Clive Owen (The Knick)

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

Robin Wright (House Of Cards)

Julianna Marguiles (The Good Wife)

Viola Davis (How To Get Away With Murder)

Claire Danes (Homeland)

Ruth Wilson (The Affair)

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES – MUSICAL OR COMEDY

Lena Dunham (Girls)

Edie Falco (Nurse Jackie)

Julia Louis-Dreyfus (Veep)

Taylor Schilling (Orange Is The New Black)

Gina Rodriguez (Jane The Virgin)

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A TELEVISION SERIES – MUSICAL OR COMEDY

Don Cheadle (House Of Lies)

Ricky Gervais (Derek)

Jeffrey Tambor (Transparent)

William H. Macy (Shameless)

Louis C.K. (Louie)

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MINI-SERIES OR A MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

Martin Freeman (Fargo)

Billy Bob Thornton (Fargo)

Matthew McConaughey (True Detective)

Woody Harrelson (True Detective)

Mark Ruffalo (The Normal Heart)

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MINI-SERIES OR A MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

Jessica Lange (American Horror Story)

Maggie Gyllenhaal (The Honourable Woman)

Frances McDormand (Olvie Kitteridge)

Frances O’Connor (The Missing)

Allison Tolman (Fargo)

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MINI-SERIES OR A MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

Jon Voight (Ray Donovan)

Alan Cumming (The Good Wife)

Bill Murray (Olive Kitteridge)

Colin Hanks (Fargo)

Matt Bomer (The Normal Heart)

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MINI-SERIES OR A MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

Allison Janney (Mom)

Uzo Aduba (Orange Is The New Black)

Kathy Bates (American Horror Story)

Michelle Monaghan (True Detective)

Joanne Froggatt (Downton Abbey)

Robbie Williams

James Bond: The mysterious British Special Agent known worldwide as 007. It’s a coveted role for any actor. As the likes of Sean Connery, Daniel Craig and Pierce Brosnan have shown, playing the role of James Bond makes you not only a bankable star in one of the highest grossing franchises of all time, but it can also make sure that your name lives on for generations to come. It is for that reason that it is hard to fathom why some actors have actually been offered the lucrative role and then turned it down.

In 1970, the producers behind the franchise were looking to replace one of the most popular James Bond actors of all time, Sean Connery. First on the list was one of the finest American actors going around: Clint Eastwood. The star had made a name for himself in western films such as “The Good, The Bad, The Ugly” and “A Fistful Of Dollars,” so it wasn’t surprising that he was looked at for the role of James Bond. However, when offered the role, Eastwood turned it down because he felt the role should go to a British actor. It was probably a good thing he did turn down the role, or he would most likely not have gotten to play his most famous role – that of Harry Callahan in “Dirty Harry.”

The fact that Bond should be British also scared off a few more of the actors that were also approached for the role. TV’s Batman Adam West was also looked at the role, as was Burt Reynolds, another actor who had made a name for himself in the Western genre…this time in the television series “Gunsmoke.”

Also considered for the role of James Bond in the early 1970s was an actor who is known to fans of the Harry Potter franchise as Professor Albus Wulfric Brian Dumbledore – the theatre-trained Michael Gambon. Despite being a forerunner to play Bond, however, Gambon turned down the role because he didn’t feel that he had the looks to full off playing the debonair spy who was popular with the ladies.

In the mid 1990s, one of Ireland’s favorite sons, Liam Neeson, turned down the role of James Bond because he said he wasn’t interested in starring in action films. Something obviously changed his mind over the years as he is now the successful star of the “Taken” series of films.

Flash-forward to the 2000s and there was a fresh batch of performers who were threatening to take the role ahead of Daniel Craig. After he parodied the James Bond character in his “Millenium” video clip, popstar Robbie Williams was actually approached about playing the role in a feature film. However, he turned down the role saying he didn’t feel like he was refined enough for the role.

Aside from Williams, other actors considered to play James Bond in the 2000s were Dominic West, who went on to make a name for himself in “300” and “The Wire,” and Ewan McGergor who has received critical acclaim for films such as “Trainspotting,” “Black Hawk Down” and “Moulin Rouge” while winning over fans in George Lucas’ reboot of the “Star Wars” franchise. McGregor turned down the Bond role because he was afraid of becoming typecast, while West pulled himself out of the running when he heard that Pierce Brosnan may have been wanting to return to the role.

However, the actor who was the biggest threat to Daniel Craig was Australian actor Hugh Jackman. The Aussie actor was perfect for the role; he had the looks and was a guaranteed crowd pleaser, as his work as Wolverine in the “X-Men” franchise showed. The producer’s plans of naming Jackman as the new Bond were shelved, however, when Jackman read the script and didn’t like the direction the series was going in.

Whenever the role of James Bond is left vacant, there are never a shortage of names that are linked to the role. However, as time has shown in the past, just because an actor has made the decision to turn down what could have been the biggest role of their life, it doesn’t necessarily mean they still won’t become famous.