Tagged: Austin Butler

It has taken ELVIS just 20 days to break into the Top 10 highest grossing Australian films of all time with its local box office takings exceeding $22million. Currently ranked 10th, strong word of mouth about the film means ELVIS will likely move further up the list in coming weeks.

The visionary Australian filmmaker Baz Luhrmann is once again a hometown hero with his big-screen spectacle about the life and music of Elvis Presley, his latest cinematic achievement becoming his fourth film in the Top 10—the most of any director.

Released on June 23, ELVIS saw Luhrmann achieve his biggest opening day in Australia with $1.3m and the second biggest opening weekend for an Australian film taking $6.74m, falling just shy of the top Australian opener, his own The Great Gatsby ($6.79m) in 2013.

ELVIS had its world premiere at the 75th Festival de Cannes in May before the film’s Australian premiere on the Gold Coast in early June. This was followed by an east coast press tour and Sydney premiere with Baz Luhrmann, Tom Hanks, Austin Butler, Olivia DeJonge, Catherine Martin and many of the Australian cast and crew out in force supporting the film.

Luhrmann said: “Hearing this wonderful news, for me personally, feels like we’ve really come full circle now with ELVIS. From the first day I called ‘action’ to the last shot, through post-production and finally being able to deliver this film to the world in such a big way, it’s meant everything to me that we were able to accomplish all of that in my home country, in support of Australia. So now, to feel the support of the Australian cinemagoers for this film is so humbling, and so moving. I am thrilled to enjoy this success alongside all of our talented cast and crew, who were so devoted to bringing Elvis’s story to the screen. As Elvis would say, we were just taking care of business.”

ELVIS was shot entirely on the Gold Coast with the support of the Queensland Government through Screen Queensland and the Australian Government’s Producer Offset program. A thoroughly cinematic drama, Elvis’s (Butler) story is seen through the lens of his complicated relationship with his enigmatic manager, Colonel Tom Parker (Hanks).  As told by Parker, the film delves into the complex dynamic between the two spanning over 20 years, from Presley’s rise to fame to his unprecedented stardom, against the backdrop of the evolving cultural landscape and loss of innocence in America.  Central to that journey is one of the significant and influential people in Elvis’s life, Priscilla Presley (Olivia DeJonge).

The film’s 95 Australian cast members include Helen Thomson and Richard Roxburgh as Elvis’ parents Gladys and Vernon, Luke Bracey, Natasha Bassett, David Wenham, Xavier Samuel, Kodi Smit-McPhee and Dacre Montgomery.

QLD Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said: “I am proud of working with Baz to secure this outstanding production, and that Queensland’s Gold Coast and more than 900 local cast and crew – from costumers to caterers, and hundreds of local extras cast as screaming fans − could help Baz’s vision become reality and contribute more than $130 million to our economy. Queensland’s ability to transport record numbers of cinemagoers across Australia into the world of Elvis, firmly cements our position as a film production capital.”

Screen Queensland CEO Kylie Munnich added: “We all knewELVIS was a hit the moment we watched the premiere at the Gold Coast on 4 June. And Australia agrees! We are thrilled this film was made in Queensland, with the support of Screen Queensland and congratulate Bazmark and Warner Bros.”

The Top 10 Australian Films

  1. Crocodile Dundee (1986), $47,707,598
  2. Australia (2008), $37,555,757
  3. Babe (1995), $36,797,861
  4. Happy Feet (2006), $31,786,593
  5. Lion (2017), $29,563,329
  6. Moulin Rouge! (2001), $27,765,415
  7. The Great Gatsby (2013), $27,385,977
  8. Peter Rabbit (2018), $26,760,008
  9. Crocodile Dundee 2 (1988), $24,916,805
  10. ELVIS (2022), $22,124,882

Summary:  Doctor Strange teams uFrom his childhood in Tupelo, Mississippi to his rise to stardom starting in Memphis, Tennessee and his conquering of Las Vegas, Nevada, Elvis Presley becomes the first rock ‘n roll star and changes the world with his music.

Year: 2022

Cinema Release Dates:  23rd June 2022 (Australia), 23rd June 2022 (Thailand), 24th June 2022 (UK), 24th June 2022 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: Australia, USA

Director: Baz Luhrman

Screenwriter: Baz Luhrman, Sam Bromell, Craig Pearce, Jeremy Doner

Cast: Charles Allen (Reverend Brewster), Princess Mariama Andrews (Sweet Inspirations – Cissy), Gad Banza (Shake Rag Friend – Doc), Natasha Bassett (Dixie Locke), Natalie Bassingthwaighte (Dee Stanley), Nicholas Bell (Senator Eastland), Mike Bingaman (Sonny West), Liz Blackett (Grandma Dodger), Luke Bracey (Jerry Schilling), Sharon Brooks (Sweet Inspirations – Sylvia), Miles Burton (Shake Rag Friend – Bobby), Austin Butler (Elvis), Gary Clark Jr. (Arthur ‘Big Boy’ Crudup), Sandro Colarelli (Tony Goochera), Josie Cross (Glenda), Elizabeth Cullen (Natalie – Motel Girl), Gareth Davies (Bones Howe), Olivia DeJonge (Priscilla), Hilton Hyppolite Denis (Claude Thompson), Shonka Dukureh (Big Mama Thornton/Pentecostal Singer), Adam Dunn (Bill Black), Leon Ford (Tom Diskin), Miranda Frangou (Nell), Charles Grounds (Billy Smith), Tom Hanks (Colonel Tom Parker), Kelvin Harrison Jr. (B.B. King), Chaydon Jay (Young Elvis), ALyson Joyce (Marie Knight), Jenna Kenney (Barbara Hearn), Aristene Kisando (Sweet Inspirations – Myrna), Christian Kisando (Shake Rag Friend – Smoky), Alex Knight (Ron Tutt), Alton Mason (Little Richard), Christian McCarty (Red West), Josh McConville (Sam Phillips), Jack McGirr (Tommy), Senayt Mebrahtu (Sweet Inspirations – Estelle), Ange Miliken (Madam Z), Dacre Montgomery (Steve Binder), Andrea Moor (Nurse Tish), Cle Morgan (Mahalia Jackson), John Mukristayo (Jimmy), Kate Mulvany (Marion Keisker), Tony Nixon (Dr. Nick), Sarah Ogden (Mrs. Eastland), Anthony Phelan (Meyer Kohn), Greg Powell (Milton Berle), Alex Radu (George Klein), Terepai Richmond (DJ Fontana), Richard Roxburgh (Vernon), Patrick Shearer (DJ Dewey Phillips), Kodi Smit-McPhee (Jimmie Rodgers Snow), Xavier Samuel (Scotty Moore), Christopher Sommers (Horace Logan), Helen Thomson (Gladys), Melina Vidler (Barbara), David Wenham (Hank Snow), Katrina West (Ann Eastland), Mark Leonard Winter (Tom Hulett), Yola (Sister Rosetta Tharpe)

Running Time: 149 mins

Classification: M (Australia), G (Thailand), 12-A (UK), PG-13 (USA)

OUR ELVIS REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Elvis Review:

Nobody makes films like Australian director Baz Luhrmann. Luhrmann’s own style of filmmaking was there for all to see with his 90s hit Strictly Moulin. From there he went from strength to strength wowing audiences with his own take on the classic Shakespearian tale of Romeo & Juliet and then of course came the gem in his crown – the visually spectacular Moulin Rouge. It seems the only blemish in Luhrmann’s career to date was the sub-standard Australia that made the country it was named after cringe.

When you think of the loud music and the glitz and glamour that Luhrmann loads his movies with you soon realise that he is the perfect filmmaker to bring the story of the great Elvis Presley to the big screen. Presley like Luhrmann was a glitzy showman who shone brightest when the spotlight was him and to the former’s credit he captures all that and more with his latest epic – Elvis.

Told through the eyes of Presley’s (Austin Butler – Arrow) long-time manager Colonel Tom Parker (Tom Hanks – Castaway) Elvis follows Presley’s career right from the earliest days when he performed to make money for his parents, Vernon (Richard Roxburgh – Van Helsing) and Gladys (Helen Thomson – Kangaroo Jack) through to Parker signing a long term deal that would see him perform some of his most energetic shows on the Vegas.

Along the way we see the young Presley working with musicians such as Little Richard (first time actor Alton Mason) who helped form his now famous sound and also his more personal moments especially as his relationship with Priscilla (Olivia DeJonge – Better Watch Out) begun to blossom.

Most will go into Elvis expecting a movie that is full of glitz and glam but lacks substance, in reality though nothing is further than the truth. Luhrmann surprisingly digs deep into the live of Elvis Presley and touches on some of the darker moments and events that happened throughout his career.  Topics such as racist politicians and law enforcement officers targeting Elvis during the early days of his career are explored in great depth and ground the film, it is a rarity to see Luhrmann tackle serious subjects like this in his films but he shows here that he is more than capable of it.

Likewise despite the fact the film is told through the eyes of Parker Luhrmann allows the film to explore many of the allegations brought against him. Early on Parker while acting as narrator defends himself saying he never did anything to harm Elvis yet later we see him recounting times when he pushed the man to the limit of exhaustion fuelling his drug habit while making selfish decisions that would benefit him but damage the career of the man he supposedly cared for.

Perhaps Luhrmann’s hand on the film really comes to light though during Presley’s Vegas years. The flashy neon lights and the fast pace of Las Vegas are perfect fodder for Luhrmann’s style of filmmaking and the scenes of Elvis on stage in Vegas are some of the highlights of the film – especially given that Austin Butler’s performance is so believable that it feels like you are watching archival footage.

In fact it probably isn’t out of place to suggest that Butler could easily earn an Oscar nomination for this film. His performance here is faultless as he literally seems to become Elvis. His singing voice mimics the King to a tee what his dancing ability is off the charts. When you mix that with his fine acting performance that takes him through all the emotions what you see here is one of the best acting performances of 2022.

This is also one of Tom Hanks finest acting performances to date, and that is saying something given the calibre of Hanks’ previous roles. He seems to embrace being able to play Parker as a type of villain and his performance is one of the most memorable things from the film. Likewise Olivia DeJone is stunning at Priscilla, she may have limited screen time but she makes use of what she does have.

Elvis far exceeds the expectations that many will have from it. The serious tone of the film is a huge step up and a surprise from Luhrmann. He keeps control of this film remarkably well knowing the right times to unleash his glitzy brilliance and when to hold it back for some of the films more serious moments. Together Luhrmann, Butler and Hanks have created something very special, something that is one of the best films of the year.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Alex First, Greg King, Jacqui Hammerton and Peter Krausz’s Elvis Review:

Alex’s rating Out Of 5

Greg’s rating Out Of 5

Jacqui’s rating Out Of 5

Peter’s rating Out Of 5

Average Subculture Rating:

Other Subculture Elvis Reviews:

N/A

Trailer:

ELVIS is an epic, big-screen spectacle from Warner Bros. Pictures and visionary, Oscar-nominated filmmaker Baz Luhrmann that explores the life and music of Elvis Presley, starring Austin Butler and Oscar winner Tom Hanks.

A thoroughly cinematic drama, Elvis’s (Butler) story is seen through the lens of his complicated relationship with his enigmatic manager, Colonel Tom Parker (Hanks).  As told by Parker, the film delves into the complex dynamic between the two spanning over 20 years, from Presley’s rise to fame to his unprecedented stardom, against the backdrop of the evolving cultural landscape and loss of innocence in America.  Central to that journey is one of the significant and influential people in Elvis’s life, Priscilla Presley (Olivia DeJonge).

Starring alongside Hanks and Butler, award-winning theatre actress Helen Thomson (“Top of the Lake: China Girl”, “Rake”) plays Elvis’s mother, Gladys, Richard Roxburgh (“Moulin Rouge!” “Breath”, “Hacksaw Ridge”) portrays Elvis’s father, Vernon, and DeJonge (“The Visit”, “Stray Dolls”) plays Priscilla.  Luke Bracey (“Hacksaw Ridge”, “Point Break”) plays Jerry Schilling, Natasha Bassett (“Hail, Caesar!”) plays Dixie Locke, David Wenham (“The Lord of the Rings” Trilogy, “Lion”, “300”) plays Hank Snow, Kelvin Harrison Jr. (“The Trial of the Chicago 7”, “The High Note”) plays B.B. King, Xavier Samuel (“Adore”, “Love & Friendship”, “The Twilight Saga: Eclipse”) plays Scotty Moore, and Kodi Smit-McPhee (“The Power of the Dog”) plays Jimmie Rodgers Snow.

Also in the cast, Dacre Montgomery (“Stranger Things”, “The Broken Heart Gallery”) plays TV director Steve Binder, alongside Australian actors Leon Ford (“Gallipoli”, “The Pacific”) as Tom Diskin, Kate Mulvany (“The Great Gatsby”, “Hunters”) as Marion Keisker, Gareth Davies (“Peter Rabbit”, “Hunters”) as Bones Howe, Charles Grounds (“Crazy Rich Asians”, “Camp”) as Billy Smith, Josh McConville (“Fantasy Island”) as Sam Phillips, and Adam Dunn (“Home and Away”) as Bill Black.

To play additional iconic musical artists in the film, Luhrmann cast singer/songwriter Yola as Sister Rosetta Tharpe, model Alton Mason as Little Richard, Austin, Texas native Gary Clark Jr. as Arthur Crudup, and artist Shonka Dukureh as Willie Mae “Big Mama” Thornton.

Oscar nominee Luhrmann (“The Great Gatsby”, “Moulin Rouge!”) directed from a screenplay by Baz Luhrmann & Sam Bromell and Baz Luhrmann & Craig Pearce and Jeremy Doner, story by Baz Luhrmann and Jeremy Doner.  The film’s producers are Luhrmann, Oscar winner Catherine Martin (“The Great Gatsby”, “Moulin Rouge!”), Gail Berman, Patrick McCormick and Schuyler Weiss.  Courtenay Valenti and Kevin McCormick executive produced.

The director’s behind-the-scenes creative team includes director of photography Mandy Walker (“Mulan”, “Australia”), Oscar-winning production designer and costume designer Catherine Martin (“The Great Gatsby”, “Moulin Rouge!”), production designer Karen Murphy (“A Star Is Born”), editors Matt Villa (“The Great Gatsby”, “Australia”) and Jonathan Redmond (“The Great Gatsby”), Oscar-nominated visual effects supervisor Thomas Wood (“Mad Max: Fury Road”), music supervisor Anton Monsted (“Australia”, “Moulin Rouge!”) and composer Elliott Wheeler (“The Get Down”).

Principal photography on “Elvis” took place in Queensland, Australia with the support of the Queensland Government, Screen Queensland and the Australian Government’s Producer Offset program. 

A Warner Bros. Pictures Presentation, A Bazmark Production, A Jackal Group Production, A Baz Luhrmann Film, “Elvis” will be distributed worldwide by Warner Bros. Pictures and released in Australian cinemas on June 23, 2022.

From Oscar-nominated visionary filmmaker Baz Luhrmann comes Warner Bros. Pictures’ drama “Elvis”, starring Austin Butler and Oscar winner Tom Hanks.

The film explores the life and music of Elvis Presley (Butler), seen through the prism of his complicated relationship with his enigmatic manager, Colonel Tom Parker (Hanks).  The story delves into the complex dynamic between Presley and Parker spanning over 20 years, from Presley’s rise to fame to his unprecedented stardom, against the backdrop of the evolving cultural landscape and loss of innocence in America.  Central to that journey is one of the most significant and influential people in Elvis’s life, Priscilla Presley (Olivia DeJonge).

Starring alongside Hanks and Butler, award-winning theatre actress Helen Thomson (“Top of the Lake: China Girl”, “Rake”) plays Elvis’s mother, Gladys, Richard Roxburgh (“Moulin Rouge!” “Breath”, “Hacksaw Ridge”) portrays Elvis’s father, Vernon, and DeJonge (“The Visit”, “Stray Dolls”) plays Priscilla.  Luke Bracey (“Hacksaw Ridge”, “Point Break”) plays Jerry Schilling, Natasha Bassett (“Hail, Caesar!”) plays Dixie Locke, David Wenham (“The Lord of the Rings” Trilogy, “Lion”, “300”) plays Hank Snow, Kelvin Harrison Jr. (“The Trial of the Chicago 7”, “The High Note”) plays B.B. King, Xavier Samuel (“Adore”, “Love & Friendship”, “The Twilight Saga: Eclipse”) plays Scotty Moore, and Kodi Smit-McPhee (“The Power of the Dog”) plays Jimmie Rodgers Snow.

Also in the cast, Dacre Montgomery (“Stranger Things”, “The Broken Heart Gallery”) plays TV director Steve Binder, alongside Australian actors Leon Ford (“Gallipoli”, “The Pacific”) as Tom Diskin, Kate Mulvany (“The Great Gatsby”, “Hunters”) as Marion Keisker, Gareth Davies (“Peter Rabbit”, “Hunters”) as Bones Howe, Charles Grounds (“Crazy Rich Asians”, “Camp”) as Billy Smith, Josh McConville (“Fantasy Island”) as Sam Phillips, and Adam Dunn (“Home and Away”) as Bill Black.

To play additional iconic musical artists in the film, Luhrmann cast singer/songwriter Yola as Sister Rosetta Tharpe, model Alton Mason as Little Richard, Austin, Texas native Gary Clark Jr. as Arthur Crudup, and artist Shonka Dukureh as Willie Mae “Big Mama” Thornton.

Oscar nominee Luhrmann (“The Great Gatsby”, “Moulin Rouge!”) directed from a screenplay by Baz Luhrmann & Sam Bromell and Baz Luhrmann & Craig Pearce and Jeremy Doner, story by Baz Luhrmann and Jeremy Doner.  The film’s producers are Luhrmann, Oscar winner Catherine Martin (“The Great Gatsby”, “Moulin Rouge!”), Gail Berman, Patrick McCormick and Schuyler Weiss.  Courtenay Valenti and Kevin McCormick executive produced.

The director’s behind-the-scenes creative team includes director of photography Mandy Walker (“Mulan”, “Australia”), Oscar-winning production designer and costume designer Catherine Martin (“The Great Gatsby”, “Moulin Rouge!”), production designer Karen Murphy (“A Star Is Born”), editors Matt Villa (“The Great Gatsby”, “Australia”) and Jonathan Redmond (“The Great Gatsby”), Oscar-nominated visual effects supervisor Thomas Wood (“Mad Max: Fury Road”), music supervisor Anton Monsted (“Australia”, “Moulin Rouge!”) and composer Elliott Wheeler (“The Get Down”).

The main cast of Baz Luhrmann’s upcoming musical drama “Elvis” has been set, with Richard Roxburgh, Helen Thomson, David Wenham, Luke Bracey and Dacre Montgomery among the prominent Australian actors co-starring with Tom Hanks, Austin Butler and Olivia DeJonge in the film.

Richard Roxburgh (“Moulin Rouge!” “Breath”, “Hacksaw Ridge”) portrays Elvis’s father, Vernon Presley, and award-winning theatre actress Helen Thomson (“Top of the Lake: China Girl”, “Rake”) plays Elvis’s mother, Gladys Presley.  David Wenham (“The Lord of the Rings” Trilogy, “Lion”, “300”) plays Hank Snow, Natasha Bassett (“Hail, Caesar!”) plays Dixie Locke, Xavier Samuel (“Adore”, “Love & Friendship”, “The Twilight Saga: Eclipse”) plays Scotty Moore, Luke Bracey (“Hacksaw Ridge,” “Point Break”) plays Jerry Schilling, and Dacre Montgomery (“Stranger Things,” “The Broken Heart Gallery”), plays TV director Steve Binder.

            Joining the ensemble are Australian actors Leon Ford (TV’s “Gallipoli,” TV’s “The Pacific”) as Tom Diskin, Kate Mulvany (“The Great Gatsby,” TV’s “Hunters”) as Marion Keisker, Gareth Davies (“Peter Rabbit,” TV’s “Hunters”) as Bones Howe, Charles Grounds (“Crazy Rich Asians,” TV’s “Camp”) as Billy Smith, Josh McConville (“Fantasy Island”) as Sam Phillips, and Adam Dunn (TV’s “Home and Away”) as Bill Black.

Speaking about his cast, Luhrmann offered, “Elvis was surrounded by an extraordinary array of rich personalities, and we are very fortunate to pull together a tremendous ensemble to tell this story.  It’s exciting to unite some of Australia’s finest actors, from longtime collaborators from “Moulin Rouge!,” “Australia” and “The Great Gatsby” like Richard Roxburgh, David Wenham and Kate Mulvany, to exciting new faces such as Dacre Montgomery, Helen Thomson, Luke Bracey, Natasha Bassett and many more.  With the world as it is right now, our entire company is grateful that we can join together in this creative venture to bring employment and opportunity in front of and behind the camera, and to the community at large.”

Baz Luhrmann’s “Elvis,” explores the life and music of Elvis Presley, seen through the prism of his complicated relationship with his enigmatic manager, Colonel Tom Parker.  The story delves into the complex dynamic between Presley and Parker spanning over 20 years, from Presley’s rise to fame to his unprecedented stardom, against the backdrop of the evolving cultural landscape and loss of innocence in America.  Central to that journey is one of the most significant and influential people in Elvis’s life, Priscilla Presley.

Luhrmann directs from the current screenplay written by Luhrmann and Craig Pearce.  Luhrmann is also producing the film, alongside Catherine Martin, Gail Berman, Patrick McCormick and Schuyler Weiss, with Andrew Mittman executive producing.

The director’s behind-the-scenes creative team includes director of photography Mandy Walker (“Mulan,” “Australia”), Oscar-winning production designer and costume designer Catherine Martin (“The Great Gatsby,” “Moulin Rouge!”), editors Matt Villa (“The Great Gatsby,” “Australia”) and Jonathan Redmond (“The Great Gatsby”) and composer Elliott Wheeler (“The Get Down”).

Principal photography on “Elvis” is taking place in Queensland, Australia with the support of the Queensland Government, Screen Queensland and the Australian Government’s Producer Offset program.  The film will be distributed worldwide by Warner Bros. Pictures.

 

Principal photography will begin on September 23 on Warner Bros. Pictures’ “Elvis,” Oscar-nominated filmmaker Baz Luhrmann’s (“The Great Gatsby,” “Moulin Rouge!”) musical drama about the life and music of Elvis Presley.  Seen through the prism of his complicated relationship with his enigmatic manager, Colonel Tom Parker, the film stars Austin Butler (“Once Upon a Time in…Hollywood”) as Elvis, Tom Hanks (“A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood,” “Forrest Gump”) as Colonel Tom Parker and Olivia DeJonge (“Stray Dolls”) as Priscilla Presley. 

Looking forward to getting to work after the lengthy delay, Luhrmann stated, “We’re back to, as Elvis liked to say, ‘taking care of business!’  It is a real privilege in this unprecedented global moment that Tom Hanks has been able to return to Australia to join Austin Butler and all of our extraordinary cast and crew to commence production on ‘Elvis.’  I cannot emphasize enough how lucky we feel in the current climate that the state of Queensland, and Queenslanders in general, have been so supportive of this film.  We thank our partners in the Queensland Government and Queensland Health for their extremely diligent process, so that we can be an example how creativity and productivity can proceed safely and responsibly in a way that protects our team and the community at large.  We are all excited to start working with Tom Hanks when he is out of quarantine in two weeks.”

The story delves into the complex dynamic between Presley and Parker spanning over 20 years, from Presley’s rise to fame to his unprecedented stardom, against the backdrop of the evolving cultural landscape and loss of innocence in America.  Central to that journey is one of the most significant and influential people in Elvis’s life, Priscilla Presley.

Luhrmann directs from the current screenplay written by Luhrmann and Craig Pearce.  Luhrmann is also producing the film, alongside Catherine Martin, Gail Berman, Patrick McCormick and Schuyler Weiss, with Andrew Mittman executive producing.

The director’s behind-the-scenes creative team includes director of photography Mandy Walker (“Mulan,” “Australia”), Oscar-winning production designer and costume designer Catherine Martin (“The Great Gatsby,” “Moulin Rouge!”), editors Matt Villa (“The Great Gatsby,” “Australia”) and Jonathan Redmond (“The Great Gatsby”) and composer Elliott Wheeler (“The Get Down”).

Principal photography on “Elvis” is taking place in Queensland, Australia with the support of the Queensland Government, Screen Queensland and the Australian Government’s Producer Offset program.  The film will be distributed worldwide by Warner Bros. Pictures.

 

Summary: The peaceful town of Centerville finds itself battling a zombie horde as the dead start rising from their graves.

Year: 2019

Australian Cinema Release Date: 26th September 2019

Thailand Cinema Release Date: TBA

Australian DVD Release Date: 11th March 2020

Country: United States, Swden

Director: Jim Jarmusch

Screenwriter: Jim Jarmusch

Cast: Eszter Balint (Fern), Steve Buscemi (Farmer Frank Miller), Austin Butler (Jack), Rosal Colon (Lily), Maya Delmont (Stella), Adam Driver (Officer Ronnie Peterson), Larry Fessendon (Danny Perkins), Danny Glover (Hank Thompson), Selena Gomez (Zoe), Caleb Landry Jones (Bobby Wiggins), Carol Kane (Mallory O’Brien), Bill Murray (Chief Cliff Robertson), Rosie Perez (Posie Juarez), RZA (Dean), Luka Sabbat (Zack), Chloe Sevigny (Officer Mindy Morrison), Tilda Swinton (Zelda Winston), Tom Waits (Hermit Bob), Taliyah Whitaker (Olivia), Jahi Di’Allo Winston (Geronimo)

Running Time: 104 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia) TBC (Thailand)

 

 

OUR THE DEAD DON’T DIE REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths’ The Dead Don’t Die Review:

Some directors are just an acquired taste. Think of filmmakers like Gaspar Noe or Terrence Malick. They are directors that you will normally find that cinema-lovers are left in awe of or go to the opposite and can’t stand their work. Another director that should be added to that list is Jim Jarmusch. For me films like Only Lovers Left Alive and Paterson are absolutely sensational films that need to be savoured as you watch them. At the same time though I can perfectly understand why someone wouldn’t enjoy the more alternative aspect.

Now comes Jarmusch next little beauty – The Dead Don’t Die which sees the talented director bring his own sense of humour to the zombie genre in a way that makes this a truly memorable film. So many supposed comedies this year have failed to impress me at all so it was a welcome relief to see The Dead Don’t Die and find myself laughing all the way through it.

Set in the small peaceful town of Centerville the film centres around three Police Officers who bring law and order to the town. Chief Cliff Robertson (Bill Murray – Ghostbusters, Lost In Translation), Officer Ronnie Peterson (Adam Driver – Star Wars: The Last Jedi, Inside Llewyn Davis) and Officer Mindy Morrison (Chloe Sevigny – Boys Don’t Cry, Big Love) do what they can to bring law and order to the town but when the dead start rising even they aren’t completely sure what is the best avenue to follow.

Plot wise The Dead Don’t Die is probably one of the most simplistic films you will see this year. For most of the film the plot follows the traditional zombie trope storylines that we have come to know and love over the years. What makes the film so special though is the interesting characters that Jarmusch has created to inhabit the town. Interesting characters such as Farmer Frank Miller (Steve Buscemi – Fargo, Reservior Dogs) and Zelda Winston (Tilda Swinton – Snowpiercer, Suspiria) keep the audience guessing throughout the film. Countless times you find yourself whether Zelda’s sword-fighting skills are going to be what ends up saving the town or whether someone likes Hermit Bob (Tom Waits – Seven Psychopaths, Down By Law) knows more about the events than they are letting on.

Also making the film stand-out from other zombie comedies is the unique Jarmusch humour and dialogue that is delivered by the characters here. At times the dry wit humour and language used by the characters brings back memories of legendary television shows like Northern Exposure… and that is a welcome relief in a time when it feels sometimes that some screenwriters have forgotten how to create good dialogue.

The take it or leave it aspect of this being a Jim Jarmusch film will most likely come into play for most people when he takes this film into the weird territory of breaking down the line between the characters and the actors. Early on when Adam Driver refers to a song playing on the radio as ‘the theme music’ you realise that Jarmusch breaks down the third wall and here the actors know they are ‘characters’ in a movie. That might be a little confronting and a little weird for those that are not used to alternative film-making but once you get a handle of it it is something that adds to the creativity and uniqueness of the film.

The resulting nature of the film does allow its stars to shine. Bill Murray and Adam Driver seem to enjoy the deadpan style of their character’s interactions. The pair seem to share an amazing on-screen partnership that only enhances the film. Jarmsuch’s star-pulling power also sees the likes of RZA (The Man With The Iron Fists, American Gangster) and Selena Gomez (Spring Breakers, Hotel Transylvania)  play smaller roles in the film while the inclusion of screen veterans like Danny Glover (Lethal Weapon, 2012) also add to the films atmosphere. Jarmusch also doesn’t waste his plethora of stars giving them all memorable moments while also brilliantly giving small nods to their past roles throughout the film.

What Jim Jamusch has created here is a smart horror-comedy that deserves all the accolades that the film has been garnishing. The film is smart enough to be different that previous zombie horror-comedies like Zombieland and Shaun Of The Dead and has that unique Jamusch stamp on it which will mean it is a film that will be adored by those who love his unique style of filmmaking.

 

 

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:

 

 

IMDB Rating:  The Dead Don't Die (2019) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment The Dead Don’t Die Reviews:

Nil.

 

Trailer:

Summary: A faded television actor and his stunt double strive to achieve fame and success in the film industry during the final years of Hollywood’s Golden Age in 1969 Los Angeles.

Year: 2019

Australian Cinema Release Date: 15th August 2019

Thailand Cinema Release Date: 12th September 2019

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States, UK, China

Director: Quentin Tarantino

Screenwriter: Quentin Tarantino

Cast: Zoe Bell (Janet),Gillian Berrow (Gillian),  Kansas Bowling (Blue), Parker Love Bowling (Tadpole), Madison Beaty (Katie), Michael Bissett (Officer Mike), Robert Broski (Abraham Lincoln), Austin Butler (Tex), Julia Butters (Trudi), Josephine Valentina Clarke (Happy Cappy), Clifton Collins Jnr (Ernesto The Mexican Vaquero), Maurice Compte (Land Pirate Maurice), Bruce Dern (George Spahn), Adrian Dev (Raj), Leonardo DiCaprio (Rick Dalton), Omar Doom (Donna), Lena Dunham (Gypsy), Dakota Fanning (Squeaky Fromme), Gabriela Flores (Maralu The Fiddle Player), Spencer Garrett (Allen Kincade), Rebecca Gayheart (Billie Booth), Zander Grable (Hermann The Nazi Youth), Nicholas Hammond (Sam Wanamaker), Danielle Harris (Angel), Tom Hartig (Sweet William), Maya Hawke (Flower Child), James Landry Herbert (Clem), Damon Herriman (Charles Manson), Cassidy Hice (Sundance), Emile Hirsch (Jay Sebring), Courtney Hoffman (Rebekka), Dallas Jay Hunter (Delilah), Lorenzo Izzo (Francesca Capucci), Keith Jefferson (Land Pirate Keith), Lenny Langley Jnr (Dashihi Donnell), Damien Lewis (Steve McQueen), Mikey Madison (Sadie), Michael Madsen (Sheriff Hackett On Bounty Law), Hugh McCallum (Lancer Camera Operator Hugh), Scoot McNairy (Business Bob Gilbert), Mike Moh (Bruce Lee), Timothy Olyphant (James Stacy), Al Pacino (Marvin Schwarz), Victoria Pedretti (Lulu), Eddie Perez (Land Pirate Eddie), Luke Perry (Wayne Maunder), Daniella Pick (Daphna Ben-Cobo), Brad Pitt (Rick Booth), Margaret Qualley (Pussycat), John Rabe (Darrin Stephens/Red Apple Man), Rachel Redleaf (Mama Cass), James Remar (Ugly Owl Hoot on Bounty Law), Rebecca Rittenhouse (Michelle Phillips), Margot Robbie (Sharon Tate), Samantha Robinson (Abigail Folger), Costa Ronin (Voytek Frykowski), Kurt Russell (Randy), Gilbert Saldivar (Land Pirate Gil), Chris Scagos (Benjamin), Ruby Rose Skotchdopole (Butterfly), Harley Quinn Smith (Froggie), Monica Staggs (Connie), Craig Stark (Land Pirate Craig), David Steen (Straight Satan David), Rage Stewart (Humble Harv), Sydney Sweeney (Snake), Lew Temple (Land Pirate Lew), Heba Thorisdottir (Make-Up Artist Sonya), Victoria Truscott (Gina), Brenda Vaccaro (Mary Alice Schwarz), Dreama Walker (Connie Stevens), Mark Warrick (Curt), Rumer Willis (Joanna Pettet), Rafal Zawieucha (Roman Polanski)

Runtime: 161 mins

Classification: R (Australia) TBC (Thailand)

 

 

OUR ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths Review:

The release of a Quentin Tarantino movie is now considered a cinematic event. It’s funny when a new Marvel movie is about to be released you see red carpets galore yet outside of America Tarantino’s movie just creep into cinemas, even the media screenings are 10am affairs with no big fanfare. Yet somewhere deep down inside every movie lover there is a sense that something special is about to happen. Let’s be blunt for a moment – Tarantino never makes boring films and he certainly hasn’t made a bad movie yet.

Now maybe I am in the minority because I prefer Jackie Brown to Pulp Fiction and Django Unchained to Inglorgious Basterds but I have unashamed love for the work of Tarantino and every time I go to see one of his movies for the first time I find myself turning into that little kid that I used to be when I eagerly anticipated movies like E.T. and Gremlins coming on TV again. The great news is that with Once Upon A Time In Hollywood Tarantino reaches out to his true fans with a brilliant masterpiece, but be warned it may leave casual cinema goers a little perplexed.

Tarantino sets the film in 1969 – Hollywood’s golden age that is seeing big changes happening. His central characters are aging television cowboy Rick Dalton (Leonardo DiCaprio – Inception, The Departed) and his out-of-favour stunt double Cliff Booth (Brad Pitt – Mr & Mrs. Smith, Moneyball). Living next door to Dalton is star-on-the-rise Sharon Tate (Margot Robbie – Suicide Squad, The Wolf Of Wall Street).

Life for the two households couldn’t be more different. Dalton reflects on the days when he was a television star while he now treats bit parts in television pilots like they are the answer to his resurrection. Then there his is best buddy Cliff Booth who only gets work through Dalton and even then that is tainted due to the story going around that he killed his wife. Then you have Tate whose career is taking off, she is on the verge of something big. What the three don’t know is their lives are about to be changed in a way that they could never expect.

If the synopsis makes the film sound like a character piece, that is because that is exactly what you get with this film. If you are looking for another Tarantino shoot ‘em up then look elsewhere because for three-quarters of this film the screenplay allows the audience to almost be a fly on the wall of the friendship between Dalton and Booth. Tarantino has no qualms showing Dalton have a lengthy conversation with a young actress (played brilliantly by Julia Butters) on the set of his new pilot and nor should he. When you have the screenwriting abilities of Mr. Tarantino there is no problem creating a heavily dialogue driven movie that at times wouldn’t feel out of place being a stage-play.

Perhaps what makes this film so special though is Tarantino’s eye-to-detail and the pay offs that true cinema fans will get from his references. From actual radio ads of the time playing on car radios, a killer soundtrack and appearances from greats like Bruce Lee (Mike Moh – Empires, Inhuman) and Steve McQueen (Damian Lewis – Homeland, Band Of Brothers) this perhaps one of the greatest cinematic tributes to this era of time and is something that will be long remembered.

As usual Tarantino also brings out the best in his cast. While some people may be disappointed that Robbie doesn’t get more screen time her screen presence is enough to counter-act that. Make no mistake though this is the DiCaprio and Pitt show. The on-screen chemistry between the two makes Dalton and Booth one of the best buddy relationships that Hollywood has ever seen. The two men also completely embrace their roles. As usual DiCaprio completely dissolves into being the character he is playing and this time he takes Pitt with him. Fans of movies like Moneyball will know that Pitt is not just the pretty-boy actor he used to be but here we see Pitt find another acting range and he matches DiCaprio in every scene they share.

While Once Upon A Time In Hollywood is different to anything that Tarantino has ever done before this movie can be summed up in one word – a masterpiece. Not many directors can pull off a film that is largely dialogue driven and then explodes with a graphic thrilling finale like this film does – but then is there anything that Mr Tarantino can’t do. Once Upon A Time In Hollywood is pure cinematic bliss for serious cinema lovers.

 

 

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IMDB Rating:  Once Upon a Time... in Hollywood (2019) on IMDb

 

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