Tagged: Jack Schreier

Paper Towns

Summary: Based on a novel by John Green Paper Towns tells the story of Quentin Jacobson (Nat Wolff) and Margo Roth Spiegelman (Cara Delevingne) who have grown up living in houses opposite each other. When they were kids they were inseparable friends who did everything together, but after the pair found a body of a man who had committed suicide and Margo became wrapped up in solving the mystery of the man’s life the pair started to drift apart.

Now they are seniors at High School. Quentin is a safe student who has focused on becoming a doctor, getting married and having children while hanging out with his somewhat geeky friends, Radar (Justice Smith) and Ben (Austin Abrams). Meanwhile Margo has become one of the most popular girls in school, dated by the popular boys and hanging out with her best friend, the beautiful Lacey Pemberton (Halston Sage).

Suddenly after years apart Margo reaches out to Quentin to help her on one night of ‘crime’ as she gets revenge on her adulterous boyfriend and his friends, then she simply disappears meaning for once his life Quentin is the one with a mystery to solve.

Year: 2015

Australian Cinema Release Date: 16th July 2015

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Jack Schreier

Screenwriter: John Green (novel), Scott Neustadter, Michael H. Weber

Cast: Austin Abrams (Ben), Hannah Alligood (Young Margo), Ryan Boz (Young Quentin 14), Cara Buono (Mrs. Jacobsen), Caitlin Carver (Becca), Josiah Cerio (Young Quentin), Meg Crosbie (Ruthie), Stevie Ray Dallimore (Mr. Jacobsen), Cara Delevingne (Margo), Ansel Elgort (Mason), Griffin Freeman (Jase), Tom Hillmann (Mr. Spiegelman), Lance Lovegrove (Robert Joyner), Drew Matthews (Gus), Kendall McIntyre (Ben At Age 12), Susan Mackie Miller (Mrs. Spiegelman), Halston Sage (Lacey), RJ Shearer (Chuck), Jaz Sinclair (Angela), Justice Smith (Radar), Nat Wolff (Quentin)

Runtime: 109 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR PAPER TOWNS REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

There will not be a film that frustrates you as much this year as Paper Towns will. The film starts off, as the trailer suggests, as a well written teenage mystery, in the vain of a modern day Secret Seven or Famous Five, but then just as the film starts to get interesting it simply peters out with one of the weakest endings you are ever likely to see.

The disappointing thing is that director Jake Schreier (who directed the brilliant Robot & Frank) and a screenwriting team that boast The Spectacular Now and (500) Days Of Summer on their resume draw you in really early and have you loving this film in a way that suggests it could be one of your favorite films of the year. For once they seemed to have created very realistic characters with their own individual personalities. There are no clean cut Hollywood teens here, instead you get genuinely confused high school kids that show all the personality traits of the kids that you went to school with, including that kid that was obsessed by sex and saw every women (including his friend’s Mums) as a chance.

As a result you find yourself really barracking for these realistic characters so when Margot disappears you invest a lot of interest in whether or not Quentin can find her. But is here that the writing in this film falls away completely. It seems that as soon as the characters embark on their road trip all the suspense and drama of this film just goes completely out the window, and not even a near miss car accident can re-ignite it. Really the road trip should have started a lot earlier and been the main focus of the film but instead it becomes a rushed effort during which all the good characterization seems to simply disappear and important moments in the lives of the characters are just brushed over really, really quickly.

Then comes the final insult a finale that you both want to praise and criticize. First off you want to congratulate the creative team behind the film for not going with the traditional American ending that you would expect with a teenage romance, but at the same time the ending frustrates you so much that you feel that the only way the filmmakers could appease themselves is by delivering one of those dreaded sequels that gives you some insight into what happens to the characters when they go off to college (or whatever one in particular decides to do).

The one thing that Paper Towns does deliver though is some future stars. Nat Wolff steps up from Fault In Our Stars and takes over the lead role pretty well, while Cara Delevingne really shows just how far she has come in her short career with a commanding performance that shows that she may well follow in the footsteps of Jennifer Lawrence and Shailene Woodley and use a teenage flick like this to launch her into much better things acting wise. Then there is Halston Sage, who despite her smaller role manages to steal a lot of scenes, especially with a strong emotional scene set in a bath tub of all places. With her good looks and great acting skills Sage certainly has a big career ahead of her.

While early on Paper Towns threatens to be a teenage flick as good as The Spectacular Now or The First Time it ends up disappointing its audience with a melancholy finale and some really lame road trip scenes. Somewhere along the creative line something dreadful happened with Paper Towns and this once promising film just falls by the wayside, sad but true.

 

 

Stars(3)

 

 

Greg King:

You can hear Greg’s full Paper Towns review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #138

 

Stars(3.5)

 

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3.5)

 

IMDB Rating: Paper Towns (2015) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Ruben Guthrie reviews: You can listen to our Paper Towns review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #138. You can also read our Paper Towns review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt

Trailer:

Summary: Set in the near future, Frank, a retired cat burglar, has two grown kids who are concerned he can no longer live alone.  They are tempted to place him in a nursing home until Frank’s son chooses a different option: against the old man’s wishes, he buys Frank a walking, talking humanoid robot programmed to improve his physical and mental health.  What follows is an often hilarious and somewhat heartbreaking story about finding friends and family in the most unexpected places.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 15th November 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Jack Schreier

Screenwriter: Christopher D. Ford

Cast: Bonnie Bentley (Ava), Frank Langella (Frank), Rachel Ma (Robot), James Marsden (Hunter), Susan Sarandon (Jennifer), Peter Sarsgaard (Robot (voice)), Jeremy Sisto (Sheriff Rowlings), Jeremy Strong (Jake), Liv Tyler (Madison)

Runtime: 89 mins

Classification: M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Robot & Frank’ Review:

Take a quick look at the poster for Robot & Frank and you could be excused for thinking that you are about to head into a film that is so low on the budget that they have used a dodgy robot left over from the Pixar design team. If that makes you turn around and leave the cinema though it means you’ll be missing out on seeing one of the films of the year… because Robot & Frank is an absolute gem.

Frank (Frank Langella – Unknown, The Time Being) is a former prisoner who even is his old age is finding it hard to give up the habit of having to steal every now and then. He lives a very lonely life, he’s been divorced for thirty years and his son Hunter (James Marsden – Bachelorette, TV’S 30 Rock) visits when he can and his daughter Madison (Liv Tyler – The Ledge, Super) phones in quick thirty second video calls from wherever her travels have taken her this week.

Although he would never admit it Frank does struggle with life, things like household chores become too much for him and his only escape from his life is to go to the library and visit Jennifer (Susan Sarandon – That’s My Boy, The Company You Keep) whom he has a crush on. However things are about to get a lot better for Frank when Hunter buys Frank a Robot (voiced by Peter Sarsgaard – Green Lantern, Knight & Day) that is supposed to make life easier for Frank… he just has to accept that.

Together director, Jake Schreier (Christopher Ford Sees A Film) and screenwriter, Christopher D. Ford (Eugene!, The Fuzz) have created a very special film indeed. Despite the fact Frank is a criminal you can’t help but feel for him, especially when you realise that he is a very lonely man indeed. The fact that you find yourself relating to him means that whether the threat is coming from the police or from the ‘evil’ Jake (Jeremy Strong – Lincoln, See Girl Run) you want to see Frank and Robot outsmart them.

The other big win that Schreier and Ford can celebrate is the fact that despite his plain look and monotone voice the character of Robot also becomes quite likable, so much so that you realise aside from its science fiction based plot this is ultimately a ‘buddy’ film… and a very good one at that.

Frank & Robot is so good that it shouldn’t be completely dismissed that Frank Langella’s name could come to the fore during Awards season. Langella puts in a truly remarkable performance that really allows him to shine as his co-stars, including Susan Sarandon, Liv Tyler and James Marsden are all given limited screen time.

This little indie classic will warm the hearts of even the hardened cinema fan and don’t be surprised if it doesn’t earn itself a couple of Awards.


Other “Robot & Frank’ Reviews By Dave Griffiths: http://www.helium.com/items/2390485-robot-frank-review

Rating: 4.5/5 Stars

IMDB Rating: Robot & Frank (2012) on IMDb