Tagged: Jake Weber

Summary:  A teenage murder witness finds himself pursued by twin assassins in the Montana wilderness with a survival expert tasked with protecting him — and a forest fire threatening to consume them all.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates: 13th May 2021 (Australia), 13th May 2021 (Thailand), 17th May 2021 (UK), 14th May 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: Canada, USA

Director: Taylor Sheridan

Screenwriter: Michael Koryta, Charles Leavitt, Taylor Sheridan

Cast: Gabe Baca (Officer R. Hermes), Jon Bernthal (Ethan), Ryan Jason Cook (Leo), Mary Fenton (Beth), Howard Ferguson Jnr. (Vic), Aidan Gillen (Jack), Carma Harvey (Deborah Killdeer), Nicholas Hoult (Patrick), Angelina Jolie (Hannah), James Jordan (Ben), Tory Kittles (Ryan), Finn Little (Connor), Lora Martinez-Cunningham (Tina), Matt Medrano (MarshallFranks), Laura Niemi (Maggie), Tyler Perry (Arthur), Medina Senghore (Allison), Boots Southerland (Sheriff), Jake Weber (Owen)

Running Time: 100 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia), 15 (UK), R (USA)

OUR THOSE WHO WISH ME DEAD REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Those Who Wish Me Dead Review:

Over recent years filmmaker Taylor Sheridan has had a huge impact on Hollywood. His screenplay for the hard-hitting Sicario heralded in a new age of dramatic intensity within a market that many said had gone soft. Then came his work on the under-rated Hell Or High Water and the brilliant Wind River. Sheridan was no longer a light-weight he had awards in his back pocket and actors like Jeremy Renner were lining up to work with him. To show that was no flash in the pan then came one of the most eagerly-anticipated television shows of 2020 – Yellowstone – of which Sheridan was the main creator.

Now Sheridan teams up with one of Hollywood’s biggest stars – Angelina Jolie (Tomb Raider) in the edgy action thriller Those Who Wish Me Dead. Jolie plays damaged fire-jumper (fire-fighter) Hannah Faber who has been sent to an outpost fire tower to work as a spotter after she has become an emotional mess after being involved with a forest fire that claimed the lives of children and one of her colleagues.

While believing that her new post will be much more peaceful Hannah soon comes across a young boy Connor Casserly (Finn Little – Angel Of Mine) who is being hunted down by ruthless assassins Jack (Aidan Gillen – Game Of Thrones) and Patrick Blackwell (Nicholas Hoult – Mad Max: Fury Road).

Despite her own demons Hannah realises that only her and the boy’s uncle, local Police Officer Ethan Sawyer (Jon Bernthal The Walking Dead), can keep him alive. To add to the pressure they also find themselves trapped by a forest fire that was lit by the assassins as a distraction for local authorities.

You soon realise when watching Those Who Wish Me Dead that in contains all the tropes that has made Sheridan one of Hollywood’s most interesting filmmakers at the moment. The film is edgy – it doesn’t stick to the Hollywood rules of trying to keep the film to a low classification. Most of the characters are damaged and they talk and act like they are damaged – they swear when under pressure and they certainly don’t play nice.

While over the years Hollywood has normally tried to shy away from violence towards the vulnerable – as can be expected Sheridan puts the vulnerable at risk. It doesn’t matter that the key target here is a child – Jack and Patrick are blood-thirsty assassins who will not think twice about blowing young Connor away. The result is a realism that is normally never present in an action thriller like this plus a level of intensity and suspense that is normally only reserved for European or Scandinavian cinema.

To add even further to that suspense is the forest fire storyline. There are times during this film when likable characters such as Sawyer’s pregnant partner, Allison (Medina Senghore – Blindspot!) find themselves trapped between the fire and the insatiable killers and that only raises the stakes even more. Sheridan plays on the human condition that we are all terrified by fire and its ferocious nature and he uses it to his advantage.

It is a welcome relief to see Jolie back in an ‘action’ flick as she has spent much of the last decade making family films and doing voice work. She seems to relish being in a role with edge and the scenes that she shares with young Finn Little are natural and memorable. Jon Bernthal’s performance in the film is also a stand-out and his fans will be happy to see that this time he has been given a chance to play a hero rather than a villain.

To be honest Those Who Wish Me Dead is probably closer to a blockbuster than the ‘indie’ feeling films like Hell Or High Water or Wind River that Taylor Sheridan has made in the past. But just like those films this one is full of memorable characters, a hard edge and suspense that is going to make you want to watch it time and time again.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Lee Griffiths’ Those Who Wish Me Dead Review

Lee’s Score Out Of 5:

Kyle McGraths’ Those Who Wish Me Dead Review

Kyle’s Score Out Of 5:

Average Subculture Rating:

IMDB Rating:

Those Who Wish Me Dead (2021) on IMDb

Other Subculture Those Who Wish Me Dead Reviews:

Nil.

Trailer:

Summary: The story of the Battle of Midway, told by the leaders and the sailors who fought it.

Year: 2020

Australian Cinema Release Date: 30th January 2020

Thailand Cinema Release Date: TBA

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States, Hong Kong, Canada, China

Director: Roland Emmerich

Screenwriter: Wes Tooke

Cast: Ellis Arch (Lofton Henderson), Tadanobu Asano (Tamon Yamaguchi), Tim Beckmann (Captain Rawlings), Jacob Blair (Hank Potter), Geoffrey Blake (John Ford), Cameron Brodeur (Sully Brown), Christie Brooke (Millicent McClusky), Brennan Brown (Joseph Rochefort), James Carpinello (William Brockman), Agostino Michael Cimino (Buzz Davis), Mikael Conde (Bill Miller), Darren Criss (Eugene Lindsey), Eric Davis (Miles Browning), Aaron Eckhart (Jimmy Doolittle), Luke Evans (Wade McClusky), Rachael Perrell Fosket (Dagne Layton), Dustin Geiger (Paul Crosley), Sarah Halford (Marie Pearce), Tyler Hall (William ‘Slim’ Townsend), Woody Harrelson (Chester M. Nimitz), David Hewlett (Husband Kimmel), James Hicks (Edwin Kroeger), Jason Lee Hoy (Pat Rooney), Hiromoto Ida (Prime Minister Tojo), Keenan Johnson (James Murray), Nick Jonas (Bruno Gaido), Luke Kleintank (Clarence Dickinson), Jun Kunimura (Chuichi Nagumo), Kenny Leu (Zhu Xuesan),  Russell Lewis (Frank O’Flaherty), Alexander Ludwig (Roy Pearce), Jake Manley (Willie West), Mandy Moore (Ann Best), Dennis Quaid (William ‘Bull’ Halsey), Mark Rolston (Ernest King), Madison Roukema (Barbara Best), Dean Schaller (Jack Mackeniz Jnr.), Nobuya Shimamoto (Kaku Tomeo), Peter Shinkoda (Genda Minoru), Hiroaki Shintani (Emperor Hirohito), Brandon Sklenar (George ‘Tex’ Gay), Ed Skrein (Dick Best), Etsushi Toyokawa (Isoroku Yamamoto), Jake Weber (Raymond Spruance), Patrick Wilson (Edwin Layton)

Running Time: 138 mins

Classification: M (Australia) TBC (Thailand)

 

 

OUR MIDWAY REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths Review:

If you aren’t aware of the various battles of World War II your first reaction to the trailer of Roland Emmerich’s (Godzilla) Midway is probably didn’t they already do a movie about Pearl Harbour? They did indeed, Michael Bay (Transformers) directed the very under-rated Pearl Harbour back in 2001, but while the attack on Pearl Harbour is shown in Midway it really is only a small part of the story that Emmerich is trying to tell here. Let’s just say that the Pearl Harbour attack is pretty much done and dusted in the first twenty minutes of the film.

Emmerich’s film almost feels like a ‘companion piece’ to Bay’s film. Here he focuses on the events that followed. We see Edwin T. Layton (Patrick Wilson – Insidious) an intelligence officer who actually predicated the attack on Pearl Harbour told to try and decipher what the Japanese are going to next, while Admiral Chester W Nimitz (Woody Harrelson – Natural Born Killers) is called in to orchestrate the counter-attack despite him calling it an ‘impossible situation.’

The film largely concentrates on the events after Pearl Harbour and follows pilots like Dick Best (Ed Skrein – Deadpool) and Wade McClusky (Luke Evans – Dracula Untold) as they prepare with the retaliation attacks that include The Battle Of Midway as a finale.

The biggest difference between Midway and Pearl Harbour is that while Bay went for a huge epic spectacular Emmerlich’s film feels more like a history lesson with a dramatised re-telling. The Japanese influence on the film is very easy to see. Not only do we get to see more of the story told from the Japanese side of the battles through the eyes of Commanders like Tamon Yamaguchi (Tadanobu Asano – Thor) and Isoroku Yamamoto (Etsushi Toyokawa – Love Letter) but a lot of the CGI and action sequences look a lot like you would expect to see in some of the Japanese action films that receive cinematic releases.

That style maybe a little off-putting for some audience members. You may find yourself wondering why a director who has movies like Independence Day and The Day After Tomorrow under his belt is serving up a film with fake CGI fire, but in the end that is a stylistic choice but it does further the feeling that the film is a historically correct re-telling rather than just there for entertainment.

Perhaps the biggest fault with the film though is that it tries to cram too much in. With some many characters introduced you really only get a chance to connect with a couple with the whole storyline involving the raid led by Jimmy Doolittle (Aaron Eckhart – The Dark Knight) feels rushed and brushed over when realistically it is interesting enough to have a movie of its own. Likewise Emmerlich quickly shows us John Ford (Geoffrey Blake Forrest Gump) shooting his film at Midway but then it just seems to disappear into thin air.

With that all aside though Midway is still very much a watchable movie. Screenwriter Wes Tooke’s (Colony) screenplay does allow the audience to get close to characters like Dick Best and Wade McClusky while Emmerlich’s knack for suspense really goes to the fore during the actual battle sequences. Here Emmerlich recreates that same feeling that we got from watching films like Flyboys and Top Gun as the focuses on the amazing dog-fights and death-defying dive bombing that many of the pilots found themselves involved in. This is very much a film where it is the action sequences in the finale that really saves it from becoming an average film.

What is also good to see during Midway is the fact that some under-rated stars really do get a chance to shine here. Ed Skrein and Luke Evans are amazing here, there is real chemistry to their love-hate relationship on the screen and as you watch the film you find yourself wishing that both men got more roles where they are the leading men. Woody Harrelson and Dennis Quaid (The Day After Tomorrow) are both at their brilliant bests while Patrick Wilson often steals the scenes that he is at he portrays a man shattered by the events of Pearl Harbour but then given a chance of redemption. Again his character is another that deserves a film of its own.

Midway seems to be a movie that is better suited for the serious movie lover who will enjoy a movie that is more about historically correct then it is being there for entertainment. The film does explore all the ins and out of the Battle Of Midway but may leave you feeling like you do want to know more about some of the characters involved. Certainly worth seeing though for its dog-fight scenes alone.

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:

 

 

IMDB Rating:  Midway (2019) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Midway Reviews: N/A

Trailer:

White House Down

Summary: A Secret Service agent is tasked with saving the life of the U.S. President after the White House is overtaken by a paramilitary group.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 5th September, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Roland Emmerich

Screenwriter: James Vanderbilt

Cast: Andrea Apergis (Ritter), Garcelle Beauvais (Alison Sawyer), Jason Clarke (Stenz), Chad Connell (Gabriel Byrnes), Victor Cornfoot (Agent Reid), Matt Craven (Agent Kellerman), Faber Dewar (Colonel Cameron), Jamie Foxx (President Sawyer), Kyle Gatehouse (Conrad), Jackie Geary (Jenna), Maggie Gyllenhaal (Finnerty), Falk Hentschel (Motts), Peter Jacobson (Wallace), Richard Jenkins (Raphelson), Joey King (Emily), Vincent Leclerc (Agent Todd), Rachelle Lefevre (Melanie), Anthony Lemke (Captain Hutton), Michael Murphy (Vice President Hammond), Romano Orzari (Mulcahy), Kevin Rankin (Killick), Lance Reddick (General Caulfield), Patrick Sabongui (Bobby), Andrew Simms (Roger Skinner), Jimmi Simpson (Tyler),  Channing Tatum (Cale), Lee Villeneuve (Chen), Jake Weber (Agent Hope), Barbara Williams (Muriel Walker), James Woods (Walker), Nicholas Wright (Donnie the Guide), Anatoly Zinoviev (Vadim)

Runtime: 131 mins

Classification:M

OUR REVIEWS/RATINGS OF ‘WHITE HOUSE DOWN’:

David Griffiths: Stars(2.5)

Please check Dave’s review of ‘White House Down’ that is available on The Helium Entertainment Channel

 

Greg King: Stars(3)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘White House Down’ that is available on www.filmreviews.com.au

Nick Gardener: Stars(2.5)

Please check Nick’s review of ‘White House Down’ that is available on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep 48

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(2.5)

IMDB Rating:  White House Down (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘White House Down′: Please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep 48 for our in-depth review of ‘White House Down.’

Trailer: