Tagged: William Zappa

Summary: A Federal Police Officer travels back to his hometown to solve a murder involving his best friend. His arrival in town wakes up old ghosts though as he himself left the town years earlier a murder suspect.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates: 1st January 2021 (Australia)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: USA, Australia

Director: Robert Connolly

Screenwriter: Robert Connolly, Harry Cripps, Jane Harper (novel)

Cast: Eric Bana (Aaron Falk), Eddie Baroo (McMurdo), BeBe Bettencourt (Ellie Deacon), Sam Corlett (Young Luke), Nick Farnell (Sgt. O’Connell), James Frecheville (Sullivan), Bessie Holland (Sally), Joe Klocek (Young Aaron Falk), Renee Lim (Sandra Whitlam), Francene McAsey (Amanda), Matt Nable (Grant Dow), Keir O’Donnell (Greg Raco), Genevieve O’Reilly (Gretchen), John Polson (Scott Whitlam), Claude Scott-Mitchell (Young Gretchen), Bruce Spence (Gerry Hadler), Miranda Tapell (Rita Raco), Jeremy Lindsay Taylor (Erik Falk), Martin Dingle Wall (Luke Hadler), William Zappa (Mal Deacon)

Running Time: 117 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia)

OUR THE DRY REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ The Dry Review:

One of the things that makes Australian cinema stand out from other films is the grit that quite often comes with it. When I say that I am not just talking about genre flicks I am talking about drama films like Romper Stomper that just seem to go that extra step further than most other films.

When you mix that grit with the visuals that you get from classic Australian films like Picnic At Hanging Rock and Wake In Fright you suddenly get something very special. That is when you end up with films like Robert Connolly’s new film The Dry.

Of course Connolly is no stranger to the kind of gritty filmmaking that I was just talking about. It is something that he has brought to the screen previously with films like Balibo which explored one of the most important events to ever occur in Australian media history.

With his new film, The Dry, Connolly captures that grit as the story centres around successful Federal Police Officer Aaron Falk (Eric Bana – Troy) who returns to the country town where he grew up to investigate the apparent murder-suicide of one of his close friends.

A lot has changed in the town since Aaron has left, the town is now on its knees due to a year long drought but many of the residents have not forgotten that young Aaron (Joe Klocek – Patricia Moore) left the town a suspect in the murder of a young woman, Ellie Deacon (BeBe Bettencourt – My First Panic).

As Aaron works with local Police Officer Greg Raco (Keir O’Donnell – American Sniper) to solve the case surrounding his friend he also finds himself having to defend himself from the murder year’s before while growing close to his former friend Gretchen (Genevieve O’Reilly – Rogue One: A Star Wars Story).

Such is Connolly’s power as a filmmaker with The Dry you can literally taste the dust in your mouth as he captures amazing shots of Australia’s Wimmera alongside his cinematographer Stefan Duscio (Jungle). Often it is the scenes of Eric Bana slowly walking through dry creek beds while deep in thought that say a million more things than a whole page of dialogue could of. There is a strange beauty to this film, the same beauty that Peter Weir found with Picnic At Hanging Rock where the visuals are beautiful to look at while at the same time they capture the harshness of the Australian bush.

The film’s screenplay, put together by Connolly and co-writer Harry Cripps (2:22) also enhances the film by seemingly using every word spoken to hit the audience with impact. There are scenes here where very little is said and that just provides even more impact to dialogue when it is spoken. Of course they other power to this screenplay is the plot itself. Nothing is ever given away before it should, nothing is spoilt and as a result you have one of the best crafted crime thrillers to hit the screen since Mystery Road.

Bringing all that to the fore is the marvellous performance by Eric Bana. Throughout this film it really feels like Bana was born to play Aaron Falk. He somehow morphs completely into the role and you soon forget that you are watching Bana. His performance is balanced as he plays a character that at times is vulnerable and is at other times forced to show an aggression that helps him find the truth.

Alongside Bana O’Donnell shines as the nervous and out-of-his-depth Greg Raco. The scenes between the pair are amazing and credit must be paid to O’Donnell for not ever becoming over-awed acting alongside Australian acting royalty. A big shout out also so Eddie Baroo (Australia) who steals every scene he is in as the lovable barman McMurdo who often seems to play the voice of reason in the town… he is like a character plucked straight out of a Shakespearian tragedy. He can see the dismay and hurt around him but is powerless to stop it.

The Dry is easily one of the films of the year. Gritty, dramatic and suspenseful it is everything that a good crime thriller should be. When you combine a brilliant acting performance by Bana alongside the stunning filmmaking of Robert Connolly you end up with a beautiful Australian film that packs some real punch.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Average Subculture Rating:

IMDB Rating:

The Dry (2020) on IMDb

Other Subculture The Dry Reviews:

Nil

Trailer:

Summary: Following the death of his father in suburban Sydney, Isaac (Ewan Leslie) takes the ashes back to his father’s birthplace in Greece where he finds himself on the trail of a buried family secret.

At first he dismisses the revelation as superstitious nonsense, but over the course of his travels – from Greece to Paris to Budapest – Isaac is forced to confront the anti-Semitism of the past, the embedded bigotry in the bones of Europe and the nature of inherited guilt. It is on this fateful trip that Isaac will learn the truth of his family’s migration to Australia, their refusal to ever return to Greece, and the burden he continues to bear as a consequence of acts committed years before his birth.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 15th November 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Australia

Director: Tony Krawitz

Screenwriter: Louise Fox, Christos Tsiolkas (novel)

Cast: Coral Amiga (Yvette), Jean-Francois Balmer (Gerry), Ania Bukstein (Amina), Elena Carapetis (Sophie), Marton Csokas (Nico), Cory Derrick (B/D Joseph), Eugenia Fragos (Reveka), Melita Jurisic (Maria), Alex Lanipekun (Red), Francois Lebrun (Leah), Ewen Leslie (Isaac), Ilianna Mavronmmati (Eleni), Kenneth Moraleda (Heng), Kodi Smit-McPhee (Josef), Yigal Naor (Syd), Thanos Samaras (Andreas), Danae Skiadi (Giulia), Olivia Stambouliah (Phoebe), William Zappa (Vassily)

Runtime: 84 mins

Classification: MA15+

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Dead Europe’ Review: Sometimes experimental cinema in Australia works. Directors such as Jim Stamatakos and Bill Mousoulis have created some wonderful films in the genre over the years, but then along came Hail, a film that showed only too well what happens when experimental cinema goes wrong. Well fans of Aussie experimental cinema rejoice because the genre is again back on track with Dead Europe a great little film that has the audience’s attention from start to finish.

Based on a novel by Christos Tsiolkas it tells the story of Isaac (Ewen Leslie – Suspended, TV’S Devil’s Dust) a Greek Australian who despite the warnings of his mother decides to visit Europe for the first time after the death of his father, Vassily (William Zappa – Redd Inc., TV’S Devil’s Dust).

Once in Greece Isaac travels with his cousin Giulia (Danae Skiadi – The Boy And The Tree, TV’S 4) and her friend, Andreas (Thanos Samaras – Tied Red Thread, Homeland). Everywhere they go they hear about the supposed curse that is supposedly on Isaac’s family because of Vassily. Soon Isaac finds himself unable to contact his brother Nico (Marton Csokas – Dream House, Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter) and realizes he is being haunted by Josef (Kodi Smit-McPhee – ParaNorman, Let Me In).

Dead Europe isn’t a film for everybody. Director Tony Krawitz (The Tall Man, TV’S All Saints) takes the film into some pretty dark areas. Isaac’s homosexuality is seen in graphic detail, as is a threesome between himself, Guilia and Andreas, but none of this is done for shock value and it really does move the storyline along.

What works wonderfully well with Dead Europe is the fact that the audience is given no insight into what is actually happening, and as a result you are just as in the dark as Isaac is. You find yourself desparately trying to work out whether or not the ‘curse’ is real and you will really rack your brain to try and figure out what the whole storyline around Josef is all about. What makes Dead Europe an even better watch is that Tony Krawitz also uses some creative shots and sequences to get the story up onto the screen.

Acting wise the entire cast are standouts. Ewen Leslie and Marton Csokas will be warranting some award nominations come award seasons while they are well supported by Danae Skiadi who really announces herself as an actor with a big future ahead of her. The other big surprise is Kodi Smit-McPhee, films such as Let Me In proved just how good this young actor could be, but with Dead Europe you feel that he takes another massive step forward in his career.

Dead Europe will have a few people scratching their heads but it is certainly well worth a look.

Other Dead Europe Reviews By Subculture Writers:http://www.helium.com/items/2384828-movie-reviews-dead-europe-2012

Rating: 3.5/5 Stars

IMDB Rating: Dead Europe (2012) on IMDb