Monthly Archives: May 2014

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show

This week on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Adam, Dave, Nick and Greg take a look at new release films ‘Under The Skin’, ‘Sunshine On Leith’, ‘Maleficant,’‘Gardening With Soul,’ ‘Son Of God and ‘A Million Ways To Die In The West’. This episode also contains interviews with Charlize Theron, Seth MacFarlane, Elle Fanning and Angelina Jolie.

To listen to the show you can download it for free from our Podcast Channel – Listen/Download here

The Babadook

Summary: “Do you want to die?” seven-year-old Samuel asks his stressed-out single mother, Amelia. She wonders if his question is a threat or a warning. After dealing with Samuel’s frantic tantrums his entire life, Amelia suspects that her son has begun directing his violent misbehavior toward her. However, after a dark and foreboding children’s book called Mister Babadook mysteriously appears on Samuel’s bookshelf, Amelia must decide if her son is truly deranged, or if there really is a bogeyman lurking in their darkened halls at night.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 22nd May, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Australia

Director: Jennifer Kent

Screenwriter: Jennifer Kent

Cast: Cathy Adamek (Prue), Craig Behenna (Warren), Essie Davis (Amelia), Daniel Henshall (Robbie), Chloe Hurn (Ruby), Hayley McElhinney (Claire), Jacqy Phillips (Beverly), Tim Purcell (The Babadook), Bridget Walters (Norma), Barbara West (Mrs. Roach), Benjamin Winspear (Oskar), Noah Wiseman (Samuel)

Runtime: 95 mins

Classification: M

OUR THE BABADOOK REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Greg King: You can check out Greg’s The Babadook review on www.filmreviews,net.au

Stars(3.5)

 

David Griffiths:

Australia has always been a country known for its cult horror. Whether it be the older Oz-ploitation films like Fair Game that inspired a young Quentin Tarantino or more modern films like Storm Warning, it seems Aussies know their horror. Need further proof? Well the filmmakers behind the original Saw series… also from the land down under. Now comes the latest Aussie horror flick, the low budget The Babdook and once again the Aussies have got it 100% right.

The flick follows hard working widow Amelia (Essie Davis – Burning Man, TV’S The Slap) who tries all she can do to be a good mother to her awkward son Samuel (Noah Wiseman – The Gift). However, things are not always easy for her and as her son’s behaviour seems to push more and more people away things become increasingly worse for them.

Things then turn even more serious when a children’s book mysteriously turns up in the house. After reading the book once to Samuel Amelia realises how dark and disturbing it is. However no matter how she tries to get rid of it the book keeps returning and even worse still is the fact that the horror it speaks about, Mr. Babadook (Tim Purcell – newcomer) now haunts their home in a potentially deadly manner.

Some people may look at the low budget of The Babadook and decide to give it a wide berth but doing so will mean they miss out on one of the best horror films to surface this year. This is a film that really announces Jennifer Kent as a director to watch. Kent has grown up living and breathing horror films her whole life and it certainly shows here. This is clearly the best ‘creepy kid’ horror since Let The Right One In and it blows most of the blockbuster horrors we’ve seen in recent years right out of the water.

Kent knows that it takes more than just a creepy soundtrack and some ‘bumps and screams’ on the audio track to really frighten an audience. Here she combines so good old fashioned psychological terror with one of the creepier characters we’ve seen in the horror genre over recent years. While his name might sound like something out of a Lewis Carroll adventure the Babadook himself is a pretty good horror nasty. The fact that he isn’t afraid to attack children or maim and torture a mother shows that he means business. He along with the suspense of not knowing if any of the characters in the film are suffering from mental means the audience is often on the edge of their or jumping out of them… the two things they should be doing during a horror film.

As a director Kent also gets the best of her cast. She puts both Essie Davis and Noah Wiseman through the ringer throughout this film. Davis has been a star-on-the-rise for awhile now and this really confirms that she is among the most talented actresses in Australia at the moment while Wiseman shows that he is a child actor with a big future ahead of him. For him to constantly deliver on the screen when he is playing a gruelling role and is on screen for nearly every minute of the film really shows just how talented he is.

If you are a horror fan then you won’t want to miss The Babadook. Once again an Australian filmmaker delivers a horror film that is destined to become a cult classic.
Stars(3.5)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3.5)

 

IMDB Rating:  The Babadook (2014) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘The Babadook′: For our full The Babadook review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #80

Trailer:

Ida

Summary: Anna, an orphan raised in a convent, is preparing to take her vows when she’s sent to visit Wanda, her aunt and only living relative. A cynical, hard-drinking Communist Party judge, Wanda reveals that Anna’s real name is Ida and that her parents were Jews murdered during the Nazi occupation. So the two embark on an unusual journey through the wintry countryside to unearth their family’s dark history.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 22nd May, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Poland, Denmark

Director: Pawel Pawlikowski

Screenwriter: Rebecca Lenkiewicz, Pawel Pawlikowski

Cast: Dorota Kuduk (Kaska), Agata Kulesza (Wanda), Natalia Lagiewczyk (Bronia), Dawid Ogrodnik (Lis), Jan Wociech Poradowski (Father Andrew), Halina Skoczynska (Mother Superior), Adam Szyszkowski (Feliks), Jerzy Trela (Szymon), Agata Trzebuchowska (Anna), Afrodyta Weselak (Marysia)

Runtime: 80 mins

Classification: M

OUR IDA REVIEWS & RATINGS:

Greg King: You can check out Greg’s Ida review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #80

Stars(2.5)

Nick Gardener: You can check out Nick’s Ida review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #80

Stars(4)

David Griffiths:

“Ida” is not the kind of film that everybody will enjoy. It’s the kind of film that you need to watch and then go away on savour. Immediately after the film finishes you realise that director Pawel Pawlikowski (“The Woman In The Fifth,” “My Summer Of Love”) has made “Ida” a bleak affair, but it is only after you have a chance to sit down and think about the film that you have just seen that you realise that this is a beautifully shot film that needs its bleakness to capture its true emotion.

The film is set in Poland in 1962. Sister Anna (newcomer Agata Trzebuchowska) is about to take her final vows and become a fully fledged Catholic nun. Never knowing her parents Anna is under the illusion that her parents died when she was young and that she grew up in a Catholic but as the ceremony nears the Mother Superior (Halina Skoczynska – “All That I Love,” “Mr. Kuka’s Advice”) suggests that he go and visit her only remaining relative.

Anna reluctantly travels away from the convent and soon finds herself face to face with her Aunt – Wanda Gruz (Agata Kulesza – “In Hiding,” “Traffic Department”) an alcoholic magistrate. After an awkward meeting Wanda is horrified that Anna knows nothing about her past and soon tells her that she is in fact Jewish, is named Ida Lebenstein and that her entire family was killed during the Holocaust. Not one hundred per cent where the bodies are Wanda and Ida go on a journey of self-discovery.

Everything about this film is dark. Pawel Pawlikowski and cinematographer Lukasz Zal (“Joanna,” “Paparazzi”) bring a dark foreboding feel to “Ida.” In most shots it is raining or foggy and that matches the slow-paced dreary script that plays with complete suspense despite its pace. It is the look of the film that makes it so beautiful in a dark kind of way.

The other powerful element of this film is the screenplay. There is no way you can ever predict what is going to happen next and to the credit of the screenplay the film continues to build in suspense as the film goes on. The more Ida uncovers the more the audience finds themselves on edge as she struggles to piece together her past, look after her fragile aunt and battle with her own spiritual demons now that she has learnt that she is Jewish. Pawilkowski even allows the film and its characters to take some really unexpected turns that are guaranteed to shock.

Come Oscar time and “Ida” deserves to be talked about as a film that should be nominated, likewise its two stars. Agata Trzebuchowska puts in one of best debut performances for an actress ever and she is guaranteed to become hot property for producers over the next few years. She is well matched with Agata Kulesza who puts in a seasoned performance and brilliantly portrays the troubled Wanda in a really memorable way.

With so many films coming out each year that focus on the Holocaust sometimes they seem to lose their impact. “Ida” isn’t one of those films though, the impact hits hard and this is a film that will be long remembered after the closing credits have rolled.

 

Stars(4)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3.5)

 

IMDB Rating:  Ida (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Entertainment Ida reviews: For our full Ida review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #80. Dave’s Ida review can also be read on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

The Trip To Italy

Summary: Michael Winterbottom’s largely improvised 2010 film, The Trip, took comedians Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon (or semifictionalized versions thereof) on a restaurant tour around Northern England. In this witty and incisive follow-up, Winterbottom reunites the pair for a new culinary road trip, retracing the steps of the Romantic poets’ grand tour of Italy and indulging in some sparkling banter and impersonation-offs. Rewhetting our palates from the earlier film, the characters enjoy mouthwatering meals in gorgeous settings from Liguria to Capri while riffing on subjects as varied as Batman’s vocal register, the artistic merits of Jagged Little Pill, and, of course, the virtue of sequels.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 22nd May, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: UK

Director: Michael Winterbottom

Screenwriter: Michael Winterbottom

Cast: Marta Barrio (Yolanda), Rob Brydon (himself), Steve Coogan (himself), Rosie Fellner (Lucy)

Runtime: 103 mins

Classification: M

OUR THE TRIP TO ITALY REVIEWS & RATINGS:

Greg King: You can check out Greg’s The Trip To Italy review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #80

Stars(3.5)

 

Nick Gardener: You can check out Nick’s The Trip To Italy review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #80

Stars(4)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3.5)

IMDB Rating:  The Trip to Italy (2014) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘The Trip To Italy′: Please check our full The Trip To Italy review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #80

Trailer:

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show

This week on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Adam, Dave, Nick and Greg take a look at new release films ‘The Babadook’, ‘Ida’, ‘My Sweet Pepperland,’‘The Trip To Italy’ and ‘X-Men: Days Of Future Past’. This episode also sees Dave give a mini review of X-Men: Days Of Future Past.

To listen to the show you can download it for free from our Podcast Channel – Listen/Download here

Walking With Dinosaurs

Children have been fascinated with dinosaurs for years and years. Watch as a school group gets taken into a museum and see how the children’s eyes light up as they see a skeleton of these giant monsters from a time long ago. Aside from the skeletons that are there to educate the children, there will also be dinosaur toys, because let’s face it, children and adults alike are totally fascinated by dinosaurs. It’s for that reason that Hollywood (and other film industries) have also seen the benefit it making dinosaur films over the years, so let’s take a look at which dinosaur movies your kids will really enjoy.

“Ice Age: Dawn Of The Dinosaurs” (2009): The successful “Ice Age” series has had its fair share of prehistoric creatures over the journey. From the cute Woolly Mammoth Manny (voiced by Ray Ramano) to the nut obsessed Scrat (whatever creature he is supposed to be) the series have always had entertaining stories, with humor to boot, that also educate young viewers about the Prehistoric Age. Then came “Ice Age: Dawn Of The Dinosaurs,” which was every young dino lovers dream as Sid (voiced by John Leguizamo) finds and decides to protect some dinosaur eggs, while their parents also came along for the ride. Yes, if your kids love dinosaurs “Ice Age: Dawn Of The Dinosaurs” is certainly worth a look.

“Journey To The Center Of The Earth” (2008): Remakes often suck, but that wasn’t the case when they decided to redo Jules Verne’s famous novel for the big screen. While “Journey To The Center Of The Earth” looked good, this was more than a visual spectacular full of special effects; it was more than that as it also served up a valuable lesson about father and son bonding. As it happened, the bonding between son, Sean Anderson (Josh Hutcherson), and father, Professor Trevor Anderson (Brendan Fraser), happens when the pair suddenly find themselves on a journey to the center of the earth, a place where dinosaurs are still very much alive. If you ever find yourself at Movie World on the Gold Coast (Australia) and get a chance to see the film in their 4D cinema, then give it a shot watching it that way as well.

“Journey 2: The Mysterious Island” (2012): Okay, sequels often suck as well, but again that isn’t the case for “Journey 2: The Mysterious Island.” Brendan Fraser may not have been anywhere in sight but instead the filmmakers brought in Sean’s (Josh Hutcherson) step-father, Hank (Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson). The pair go to a mysterious island, with Kailani (Vanessa Hudgens) in tow as they get stuck in another Jules Verne’s tale to find Alexander (Michael Caine) who believes all of Verne’s stories were true. Again, there were more dinosaurs (and giant lizards) along the way, meaning that once again dinosaur fans will again be very happy.

“Jurassic Park” (1993): Okay this is one that more for the older children, but nevertheless, “Jurassic Park” is the greatest dinosaur movie of all time – just remember that there are a couple of scares along the way. Based on a Michael Crichton novel, “Jurassic Park” is still very much the jewel in Steven Spielberg’s crown. Even years later, the T-Rex is still an impressive sight as it appears on the screen and chases Dr. Alan Grant (Sam Neil) and co across the island… then there are also those cheeky raptors. If you want to impress your children even more, you may even want to let them check out the 3D version of “Jurassic Park,” which will have everybody thinking that the T-Rex is jumping right off the screen.

“Walking With Dinosaurs: The Movie” (2013): When directors Barry Cook and Neil Nightingale were given the task of bringing the famous BBC television series “Walking With Dinosaurs” to the big screen, there were a lot of people asking “how would that work?” The BBC series was certainly not a drama with a storyline, it was a documentary series that wowed people because of how it really made the dinosaurs come to life on the screen. The movie tells a story following Patchi (voiced by Justin Long), a young dinosaur who is an underdog, but faces the challenges of the prehistoric age alongside his brother Scowler (Skyler Stone) and friend Juniper (Tiya Sircar). “Walking With Dinosaurs: The Movie” both entertains and educates children (and adults) as it mixes the storyline with facts about the various species of dinosaurs with which Patchi came into contact. The fact that the film also contains a strong lesson about never giving up on your dreams is also a good learning curve as well.

If your child loves dinosaurs, then they certainly won’t be disappointed with any of the previously mentioned films. Just remember, a love of dinosaurs can always be a great tool to a child opening up their imagination.

Russell Crowe

Soap television shows. Yes, they quite often have some very tragic story-lines, terribly clichéd dialogue and some woeful acting, but believe or not some of the finest actors going around today got their start in the acting world in those dreaded soaps. Let’s have a look at some actors who have soap operas to thank for launching them.

Russell Crowe: It’s hard to imagine that screen strong man Russell Crowe started his career off in a soap opera. The actor, who hails from New Zealand, may have made a name for himself winning an Oscar for playing the tough Maximus in Ridley Scott’s “Gladiator,” but he started his acting career in an Australia soap opera called “Neighbours.” As a television show, “Neighbours” is often joked about, yet has been the starting ground for many a young celebrity including Dean Geyer, Kylie Minogue and even Guy Pearce. The ‘soft’ opening to his career certainly didn’t hold back Crowe who has become a megastar and has performed in many memorable films including “The Insider” and “A Beautiful Mind,” which also earned him Oscar nominations.

Susan Sarandon: There isn’t much that Susan Sarandon has achieved during her acting career. She has appeared in classic films such as “Thelma & Louise” and “The Rocky Horror Picture Show,” as well as receiving a number of Oscar nominations over the years – for films such as “Atlantic City,” “Lorenzo’s Oil” and “The Client.” She even won an Oscar in 1996 for her role in “Dead Man Walking,” but what most people don’t realise is that five years before she made a name for herself in “The Rocky Horror Picture Show,” she spent a year playing Patrice Kahlman in television soap “A World Apart.”

Chris Hemsworth: These days, movie fans know Aussie actor Chris Hemsworth mainly as “Thor,” the God with the Hammer that has had two feature films of his own as well as appearing in the big action blockbuster “The Avengers.” The last few years has seen Hemsworth appear in a number of big films including “Rush,” the “Star Trek” franchise, “Red Dawn,” “Snow White + The Huntsman” and “The Cabin In The Woods,” but before that Hemsworth was known to Australians as a soap star. He first made a guest appearance in “Neighbours” before starring in the other ‘rival’ soap “Home & Away” for three years.

Liam Hemsworth: Of course, it wouldn’t be right to mention Chris Hemsworth without mentioning his brother Liam who is known right around the world as the quiet and brooding Gale Hawthorne in “The Hunger Games” franchise. Liam also made a name for himself as a soap star in Australia before making his way to Hollywood. In an exact opposite to his brother, Liam started his career with a guest spot in “Home And Away” before landing a semi-regular role in “Neighbours” playing  Josh Taylor. Liam Hemsworth has also made a name for himself in America appearing in “The Expendables 2” and “Paranoia” alongside Harrison Ford.

Josh Duhamel: Many wrongfully believe that modern day big screen star Josh Duhamel got his acting break on television drama “Las Vegas,” where he played intelligent detective Danny McCoy. That theory however is wrong because Duhamel had been on the small screen years earlier than that as he played Leo du Pres in “All My Children” from 1999 to 2002. In only a storyline that only soap operas could get away with, Leo disappeared over a waterfall and his body was never found again. Since those days, Duhamel has made his way onto the big screen and appeared in “Transformers,” “When In Rome” and “Life As We Know It.”

So if you’re a budding young actor and you get cast in a television soap, certainly don’t think that the role on offer is beneath you, because as you can see, so many great big screen actors of today started with a role in the humble television soap.