Tagged: Essie Davis

Summary: 
Events leading up to the 1996 Port Arthur massacre on Tasmania in an attempt to understand why and how the atrocity occurred.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates:  30th September 2021 (Australia), 1st July 2022 (UK), 30th March 2022 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: 24th November 2021 (Australia)

Country: Australia

Director: Justin Kurzel

Screenwriter: Shaun Grant

Cast: Essie Davis (Helen), Judy Davis (Mum), Caleb Landry Jones (Nitram), Sean Keenan (Jamie), Anthony LaPaglia (Dad), Phoebe Taylor (Riley)

Running Time: 112 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia)

OUR NITRAM REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Nitram Review:

There has been a debate that has been raged over the last decade over whether or not Australian cinema does in fact suffer from ‘tall poppy syndrome.’ In one corner we have always had people that believe that Australians unfairly criticise Australian films simply because they are in fact Australian. On the other hand, we have a group of people that claim that Australian films are criticised because they are below-standard.

Perhaps the answer to the debate was best played out around the release of new Australian crime drama Nitram. As soon as the film started to gain traction amongst critics overseas suddenly a groundswell of Australians suddenly believed that the film shouldn’t have been made. Apparently, a film about notorious Port Arthur gunman Martin Bryant was distasteful to his victims – funny that that argument has never seemed to surface when Australians happily consume true-crime series like Dr. Death and Tiger King without even a whimper.

From my point of view, I have to say that Nitram is a true masterpiece. I thought that director Justin Kurzel had made something special with Snowtown, but that barely pales into significance when compared to what he has created with Nitram.

Despite what many predicted this is not a film that glorifies the sins of Bryant. Nor does it makes apologies for what he did. Instead, it shows what kind of life he lived in the lead up to the massacre and reveals several things about his personality and mental health that many of the so-called news outlets of the day simply failed to mention in their stories at the time.

Kurzel reveals Bryant… or Niram (Caleb Landry Jones – X-Men: First Class), the name he was bullied with at school, as a misunderstood loner who found it impossible to make friends no matter what he tried. His mother (Judy Davis – The Dressmaker) seemed reluctant to have his mental health treated properly while his father (Anthony LaPaglia – Lantana) wants to incorporate his son in his life while trying to overlook his ‘weird’ behavior.

The film shows Bryant falling out with his mother and beginning a relationship with the much older Helen (Essie Davis – The Babadook) who provides him with the friendship that he is always wanted and the money that means he can live the life that he has always wanted while causing more friction between his family. The result is a catastrophic cocktail that is just waiting to explode.

We had already seen with Kurzel’s past films, especially Snowtown, that he has a special knack for making realistic and natural films and that trend continues with Nitram. At times the dialogue and the film itself is so realistic that you almost have to pinch yourself to remind yourself that this is not a documentary. That Kurzel style of filmmaking brings a power to the screen that most filmmakers could only ever dream of generating.

That power also washes over the performances of Kurzels leads. Caleb Landry Jones is amazing as Nitram. I don’t just mean amazing as a standout performance I mean amazing in the sense that if Jones doesn’t win an Oscar for this film that a serious injustice has been done with the cinematic world. Jones performance here is a once in a lifetime performance and he has made this film the kind of film that means it will still be talked about in 50 if not 100 years time.

The fact that Kurzel has the skill of making this film without glorifying what Bryant did is a testament to just how good he is as a filmmaker. The film shows that Kurzel is one of the best directors that this country has ever produced and I get the distinct feeling that he is someone that alarmingly still has his best films ahead of him. Who knows he may eventually become the greatest filmmaker Australia has ever produced.

When going into Nitram remember this is a character piece, an emotionally driven film that provides answers to one of the darkest days of Australian history. Nitram does not deserve to be a divisive film it deserves to be celebrated for the stunning piece of art that it is.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Average Subculture Rating:

Other Subculture Nitram Reviews:

Nil

Trailer:

Actors Leah Purcell, Essie Davis and Caleb Landry Jones have received nominations along with Australian feature When Pomegranates Howl in the region’s highest accolade in film, the Asia Pacific Screen Awards. 

Winners will be determined by the APSA International Jury, who will be announced in the coming weeks and announced on Thursday 11 November at the 14th APSA Ceremony on Australia’s spectacular Gold Coast, and streamed across the globe. 

In 2021, 38 films from 25 Asia Pacific countries and areas were nominated, further highlighting the outstanding achievement of a nomination in the Awards, which encompass 70 countries and areas and represent half the world’s film output. 

Two Australians are nominated for Best Performance by an Actress. Leah Purcell is nominated for her powerhouse performance in The Drover’s Wife The Legend of Molly Johnson which Purcell also wrote and directed. Essie Davis is nominated for her triumphant role in Gaysorn Thavat’s acclaimed social drama, The Justice of Bunny King (NZ). Both films are screening in the upcoming Brisbane International Film Festival, and Sydney Film Festival, ahead of their cinema release.  

They are up against three remarkable actresses from the region. Alena YIV for her role in Asia, winner of Best Picture at Israel’s Academy Awards (Ophir Awards), Azmeri Haque Badhon for Rehana (Rehana Maryam Noor), the first Bangladeshi film to compete In Competition at Cannes, and from the remote Yakutia region of Russia Valentina Romana-Chyskyyray for Scarecrow (Pugalo). 

Nominated for Best Performance by an Actor, Nitram star Caleb Landry Jones was awarded the Cannes Best Actor for this role, and he vies with Iran’s Amir Jadidi for Asghar Farhadi’s Cannes Grand Prix winner A Hero (Ghahreman), and two actors from Georgia – Levan Tediashvili for who recently won Best Actor at Tribeca for Brighton 4th and Merab Ninidze for his role in Alexsy German Jnr’s Cannes’ Un Certain Regard selected House Arrest (Delo). Completing the Actor category is Japan’s Hidetoshi Nishijima for Cannes-winner Drive My Car, who also stars in another film, nominated for Best Youth Feature Film, Voices in the Wind (Kaze no Denwa).

Iranian-Australian Granaz Moussavi’s stunning When Pomegranates Howl (Afghanistan, Australia, Islamic Republic of Iran, Netherlands) is also nominated for Best Youth Feature Film. Shot on the streets of Kabul in Afghanistan, the film follows a nine-year old boy who dreams of stardom, with the significance of this work is brought into sharp focus following the recent events in that country. 

When Pomegranates Howl is produced by Moussavi with Melbourne-based Afghan-Australian Baheer Wardak,  Iranian Marzieh Vafamehr and South Australian Christine Williams, and will also screen in Sydney Film Festival.

Moussavi is one of three women directors whose films are nominated in this category, along with Yoon Dan-bi for Moving On (Nam-mae-wui Yeo-reum-bam, Republic of Korea) and Saudi filmmaker Shahad Ameen’s Scales (Sayidat Al Bahr, Iraq, United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia). The fifth film in this category is Ferit Karahan’s Turkish drama Brother’s Keeper (Okul Tıraşı).

The APSA Ceremony on November 11 will also launch the 3rd Asia Pacific Screen Forum, an action-packed six-day program of industry-led networking opportunities, designed to facilitate relationships and collaborations between filmmakers across Asia Pacific. Like the ceremony, the forum will take place both in-person and virtually, with many nominees and APSA Academy Members participating from around the globe.

Films from Japan and Islamic Republic of Iran lead the field with seven nominations each. Two films, both winners at Cannes this year, Ryusuke Hamaguchi’s Drive My Car and Asghar Farhadi’s A Hero (Ghahreman), achieved the most nominations, with both films up for the same four categories – Best Feature Film, Achievement in Directing, Best Screenplay and Best Performance by an Actor. 

Another Cannes winner, Payal Kapadia’s breakthrough A Night of Knowing Nothing (India) is also nominated for Best Feature Film, as is Russian director Natalya Nazarova’s The Pencil (Prostoy karandash) and Iranian Mohammad Rasoulof’s Golden Bear winner There is No Evil (Sheytan vojud nadarad).

Given the impact of COVID on the region, the eligibility of films in competition this year was extended back to the end of 2019, increasing the field and calibre of competition significantly.

Best Youth Feature Film award features three emerging women directors with their debut or second feature nominated. They are Yoon Dan-bi for Moving On (Nam-mae-wui Yeo-reum-bam, Republic of Korea), Granaz Moussavi’s When Pomegranates Howl (Afghanistan, Australia) and Saudi filmmaker Shahad Ameen’s Scales (Sayidat Al Bahr, Iraq, United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia) who follows in the footsteps of Haifaa al-Mansour, the first Saudi woman filmmaker who was nominated in this category in 2013. 

Competing the nominations for Best Youth Feature Film are Ferit Karahan’s Brother’s Keeper (Okul Tıraşı, Turkey, Romania) andNobuhiro Suwa’s Voices in the Wind (Kaze no Denwa, Japan) which also features Drive My Car Best Actor nominee Hidetoshi Nishijima. 

Best Animated Feature Film offers a diverse selection of themes, cultures and disciplines of animation amongst the five nominees: Bashir El Deekand Ibrahim Mousa’s The Knight and The Princess (Saudi Arabia, Egypt), Beauty Water (Gigigoegoe Seonghyeongsu, Republic of Korea), Ayumu Watanabe’s Fortune Favors Lady Nikuko (Gyoko no Nikuko-chan, Japan), Andrey Khrzhanovsky’s The Nose or The Conspiracy of Mavericks (Nos ili zagovor netakikh, Russian Federation) and Ari Folman’s Where is Anne Frank (Belgium). 

As always, the Best Documentary Feature Film nominations represent some of the most important stories of Asia Pacific, and often made in the most difficult circumstances. The nominees in 2021 are Vitaly Mansky’s Gorbachev. Heaven (Latvia, Czech Republic), Eliane Raheb’s Miguel’s War (Aanaf Hob, Lebanon, Spain, Germany), Hogir Hirori’s Sabaya (Sweden), Mohammed Abugeth and Daniel Carsenty’s The Devil’s Drivers (Lebanon, Qatar, France, Germany) and finally Rintu Thomas and Sushmit Ghosh’s Writing With Fire (India). 

Nominations for Achievement in Directing, Best Screenplay, Achievement in Cinematography and Best Performance categories for Actress and Actor follow in the list below. The winners will be determined by the APSA International Jury, who will be announced in the coming weeks.

Winners will also be announced in APSA’s three special categories, the Cultural Diversity Award under the patronage of UNESCO, the Young Cinema Award in partnership with NETPAC and GFS, and the FIAPF Award for Contribution to Asia Pacific Cinema. 

The APSA Ceremony will include the annual announcement of recipients of the four MPA APSA Academy Film Fund grants for 2021. 

The 25 Asia Pacific countries and areas represented in the nominees are Afghanistan, Australia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Egypt, Georgia, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Islamic Republic of Iran, Israel, Japan, Lebanon, New Zealand, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Turkey, United Arab Emirates and, for the first time, Vietnam. 

The 14th Asia Pacific Screen Awards and the 3rd Asia Pacific Screen Forum is presented by the Asia Pacific Screen Academy, with the support of the City Of Gold Coast, Screen Queensland, Netflix, Motion Picture Association, Griffith University Griffith Film School.

14th ASIA PACIFIC SCREEN AWARDS – FULL LIST OF NOMINATIONS

BEST FEATURE FILM
 
A Hero (Ghahreman)
Islamic Republic of Iran, France
Directed by Asghar FARHADI
Produced by Asghar FARHADI, Alexandre MALLET-GUY
 
A Night of Knowing Nothing
India, France
Directed by Payal KAPADIA
Produced by Thomas HAKIM, Julien GRAFF, Ranabir DAS
 
Drive My Car
Japan
Directed by Ryusuke HAMAGUCHI
Produced by Teruhisa YAMAMOTO
 
The Pencil (Prostoy karandash)
Russian Federation
Directed by Natalya NAZAROVA
Produced by Maxim DASHKIN, Anna VON DZIEMBOWSKA, Boris FRUMIN, Danil FERBIKOV, Denis KOVALEVSKIY
 
There is No Evil (Sheytan vojud nadarad)
Islamic Republic of Iran, Czech Republic, Germany
Directed by Mohammad RASOULOF
Produced by Mohammad RASOULOF, Kaveh FARNAM, Farzad PAK
 
 
BEST YOUTH FEATURE FILM
 
Brother’s Keeper (Okul Tıraşı)
Turkey, Romania
Directed by Ferit KARAHAN
Produced by Kanat DOĞRAMACI

Moving On (Nam-mae-wui Yeo-reum-bam)
Republic of Korea
Directed by YOON Dan-bi
Produced by YOON Dan-bi, KIM Gi-hyeon
 
Scales (Sayidat Al Bahr)
Iraq, United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia
Directed by Shahad AMEEN
Produced by R Paul MILLER, Stephen STRACHAN, Rula NASSER
 
 
Voices in the Wind (Kaze no Denwa)
Japan
Directed by Nobuhiro SUWA
Produced by Eiji IZUMI
 
When Pomegranates Howl
Afghanistan, Australia, Islamic Republic of Iran, Netherlands
Directed by Granaz MOUSSAVI
Produced by Granaz MOUSSAVI, Baheer WARDAK, Marzieh VAFAMEHR, Christine WILLIAMS
 
 
BEST ANIMATED FEATURE FILM
 
Beauty Water (Gigigoegoe Seonghyeongsu)
Republic of Korea
Directed by CHO Kyung-hun
Produced by JEON Byung-jin
 
Fortune Favors Lady Nikuko (Gyoko no Nikuko-chan)
Japan
Directed by Ayumu WATANABE
Produced by Sanma AKASHIYA, Eiko TANAKA, Shu KAMIGASO, Mitsugu YAMADA
 
The Knight and The Princess
Saudi Arabia, Egypt
Directed by Bashir EL DEEK, Ibrahim MOUSA
Produced by Alabbas BIN ALABBAS
 
The Nose or The Conspiracy of Mavericks (Nos ili zagovor netakikh)
Russian Federation
Directed by Andrey KHRZHANOVSKY
Produced by Andrey KHRZHANOVSKY
 
Where is Anne Frank
Belgium 
Directed by Ari FOLMAN
Produced by Jani THILTGES, Yves KUGELMANN, Ari FOLMAN, Alexander RODNYANSKY
 
 
BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE FILM

Gorbachev. Heaven
Latvia, Czech Republic
Directed by Vitaly MANSKY
Produced by Natalia MANSKAIA, Filip REMUNDA, Vít KLUSÁK
 
Miguel’s War (Aanaf Hob)
Lebanon, Spain, Germany
Directed by Eliane RAHEB
Produced by Eliane RAHEB
 
Sabaya
Sweden
Directed by Hogir HIRORI
Produced by Antonio RUSSO MERENDA, Hogir HIRORI
 
The Devil’s Drivers
Lebanon, Qatar, France, Germany
Directed by Mohammed ABUGETH, Daniel CARSENTY
Produced by Daniel CARSENTY, Felix BLUM
 
Writing With Fire
India
Directed by Rintu THOMAS, Sushmit GHOSH
Produced by Sushmit GHOSH, Rintu THOMAS
 
 
ACHIEVEMENT IN DIRECTING
 
Asghar FARHADI for A Hero (Ghahreman)
Islamic Republic of Iran, France
 
Dea KULUMBEGASHVILI for Beginning (Dasatskisi)
Georgia, France
 
Ryusuke HAMAGUCHI for Drive My Car
Japan
 
P S VINOTHRAJ for Pebbles (Koozhangal)
India
 
Kamila ANDINI for Yuni
Indonesia, Singapore, France
 
 
BEST SCREENPLAY
 
Asghar FARHADI for A Hero (Ghahreman)
Islamic Republic of Iran
 
Nasim AHMADPOUR, Shahram MOKRI for Careless Crime (Jenayat-e bi deghat)
Islamic Republic of Iran
 
Ryusuke HAMAGUCHI, OE Takamasa for Drive My Car
Japan
 
Dana IDISIS for Here We Are (Hine Anachnu)
Israel, Italy
 
Asif RUSTAMOV, Roelof Jan MINNEBOO, Ilgar NAJAF for Sughra’s Sons
Azerbaijan, France, Germany
 
 
ACHIEVEMENT IN CINEMATOGRAPHY
 
FENG Yuchao Robbin for A New Old Play (Jiao ma tang hui)
Hong Kong, France
 
Phuttiphong AROONPHENG for Anatomy of Time (Wela)
Thailand, Singapore, France, Netherlands
 
Vignesh KUMULAI, Che PARTHIBAN for Pebbles (Koozhangal)
India
 
NGUYỄN Vinh Phúc for Taste (Vị)
Vietnam, Singapore, France, Thailand, Germany
 
Akiko ASHIZAWA for Vengeance Is Mine, All Others Pay Cash (Seperti Dendam, Rindu Harus Dibayar Tuntas)
Indonesia, Singapore, Germany
 
 
BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS
 

Alena YIV for Asia
Israel
 
Azmeri HAQUE BADHON for Rehana (Rehana Maryam Noor)
Bangladesh, Qatar, Singapore
 
Valentina ROMANOVA-CHYSKYYRAY for Scarecrow (Pugalo)
Russian Federation
 
Leah PURCELL for The Drover’s Wife The Legend of Molly Johnson
Australia
 
Essie DAVIS for The Justice of Bunny King
New Zealand
 
 
BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR
 
Amir JADIDI for A Hero (Ghahreman)
Islamic Republic of Iran, France
 
Levan TEDIASHVILI for Brighton 4th
Georgia, Russian Federation, Bulgaria, Monaco, United States of America
 
Hidetoshi NISHIJIMA for Drive My Car
Japan
 
Merab NINIDZE for House Arrest (Delo)
Russian Federation
 
Caleb LANDRY JONES for Nitram
Australia

Further Awards to be announced 

 Stan, Australia’s unrivalled home of original productions, today announced the Stan Original Film Nitram will premiere Wednesday, 24 November on Stan. The film is also screening in select cinemas now (where cinemas are open).

To watch and share the trailer, click here: https://youtu.be/D4cTjeEFq8Q

Nitram depicts the events leading up to one of the darkest chapters in Australian history in an attempt to understand why and how this atrocity occurred. Directed by Justin Kurzel (Stan Original Film True History of the Kelly Gang, Snowtown) and written by Shaun Grant (Penguin Bloom, Snowtown), the film stars Caleb Landry Jones (Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, Get Out), Essie Davis (The Babadook, Stan Original Film True History of the Kelly), Judy Davis (My Brilliant Career, The Dressmaker) and Anthony LaPaglia (Lantana, Balibo).

Nitram screened in Official Selection for Competition at the 2021 Cannes Film Festival and was the first Australian film to compete for the Palme D’Or in a decade. Nitram marks Kurzel’s third feature film to screen at Cannes and his second in competition. The film received a standing ovation following its world premiere screening at Cannes, with Caleb Landry Jones recognised with Best Actor honours for his performance. Nitram was also awarded the CinefestOZ Film Prize in August, in addition to being selected for competition at this year’s BFI London Film Festival.

In a statement, the filmmakers commented: “Nitram was written as a response to the proliferation of regular mass shootings across the world and is an exploration of the issues and events that led to this atrocity, rather than a re-enactment of it, to bring the gun control debate to the fore and to try to ensure history does not repeat itself.”

Nitram (Caleb Landry Jones) lives with his mother (Judy Davis) and father (Anthony LaPaglia) in suburban Australia in the mid-1990s. He lives a life of isolation and frustration at never being able to fit in. That is until he unexpectedly finds a close friend in a reclusive heiress, Helen (Essie Davis). However, when that friendship meets its tragic end, and Nitram’s loneliness and anger grow, he begins a slow descent into a nightmare that culminates in the most nihilistic and heinous of acts.

A GoodThing Productions film in conjunction with Stan, the Stan Original Film Nitram is produced by GoodThing Productions’ Nick Batzias and Virginia Whitwell (2040The Australian Dream), alongside Justin Kurzel and Shaun Grant. Madman Entertainment are handling theatrical distribution, with Wild Bunch International handling worldwide sales of the film.

The Stan Original Film Nitram is in select cinemas now and will premiere Wednesday, 24 November on Stan.

 

Inspired by Peter Carey’s Man Booker Prize winning novel and starring George Mackay (1917), Essie Davis (The Babadook), Nicholas Hoult (Stan’s upcoming The GreatThe Favourite), Charlie Hunnam (Sons of Anarchy) and Russell Crowe (Stan’s The Loudest Voice), Justin Kurzel’s True History of the Kelly Gang shatters the mythology of the notorious icon to reveal the essence behind the life of Ned Kelly and force a country to stare back into its brutal past.

Spanning the younger years of Ned’s life to the time leading up to his death, the film explores the blurred boundaries between what is bad and what is good, and the motivations for the demise of its hero. Youth and tragedy collide in the Kelly Gang, and at the beating heart of this tale is the fractured and powerful love story between a mother and a son.

Stan Original Film True History of the Kelly Gang premieres this Australia Day.

AACTA Awards

The 2015 AACTA Awards were held in Sydney this week. Here are all the major winners.

BEST LEAD ACTRESS IN A TV DRAMA

Danielle Cormack (Wentworth)

Ashleigh Cummings (Puberty Blues)

Marta Dusseldorp (Janet King) – WINNER

Kat Stewart (Offspring)

BEST LEAD ACTOR IN A TV DRAMA

Luke Arnold (INXS: Never Tear Us Apart)

Richard Roxburgh (Rake)

Dan Spielman (The Code)

Ashley Zuckerman (The Code) – WINNER

BEST LIGHT ENTERTAINMENT SERIES

The Checkout

Hamish & Andy’s Gap Year: South America – WINNER

Paddock To Plate

The Project

BEST TELE-FEATURE OR MINI SERIES

Carlotta

Devil’s Playground – WINNER

INXS – Never Tear Us Apart

Secrets + Lies

BEST SCREENPLAY IN TELEVISION

Shelley Birse (The Code)

Trent O’Donnell/Phil Lloyd (The Moodys)

Josh Thomas (Please Like Me) – WINNER

Peter Duncan (Rake)

BEST DRAMA SERIES

The Code – WINNER

Janet King

Puberty Blues

Rake

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A MOVIE

Patrick Brammall (The Little Death)

Yilmaz Erdogan (The Water Diviner) – WINNER

Robert Pattinson (The Rover)

TJ Power (The Little Death)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A MOVIE

Erin James (The Little Death)

Jacqueline Mackenzie (The Water Diviner)

Kate Mulvaney (The Little Death)

Susan Prior (The Rover) – WINNER

BEST DIRECTOR (FILM)

Jennifer Kent (The Babadook) – WINNER

Rolf de Heer (Charlie’s Country)

Michael Spierig/Peter Spierig (Predestination)

David Michod (The Rover)

BEST LEAD ACTOR IN A FILM

Russell Crowe (The Water Diviner)

David Gulpilil (Charlie’s Country) – WINNER

Damon Herrimon (The Little Death)

Guy Pearce (The Rover)

BEST LEAD ACTRESS IN A FILM

Kate Box (The Little Death)

Essie Davis (The Babadook)

Sarah Snook (Predistination) – WINNER

Mia Wasikowska (Tracks)

BEST FILM

The Water Diviner – JOINT WINNER

The Railway Man

Charlie’s Country

The Babadook – JOINT WINNER

Tracks

Predestination

The Longford Lyell Award: Andrew Knight

AACTA Trailblazer Award: Rose Byrne

The Babadook

Summary: “Do you want to die?” seven-year-old Samuel asks his stressed-out single mother, Amelia. She wonders if his question is a threat or a warning. After dealing with Samuel’s frantic tantrums his entire life, Amelia suspects that her son has begun directing his violent misbehavior toward her. However, after a dark and foreboding children’s book called Mister Babadook mysteriously appears on Samuel’s bookshelf, Amelia must decide if her son is truly deranged, or if there really is a bogeyman lurking in their darkened halls at night.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 22nd May, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Australia

Director: Jennifer Kent

Screenwriter: Jennifer Kent

Cast: Cathy Adamek (Prue), Craig Behenna (Warren), Essie Davis (Amelia), Daniel Henshall (Robbie), Chloe Hurn (Ruby), Hayley McElhinney (Claire), Jacqy Phillips (Beverly), Tim Purcell (The Babadook), Bridget Walters (Norma), Barbara West (Mrs. Roach), Benjamin Winspear (Oskar), Noah Wiseman (Samuel)

Runtime: 95 mins

Classification: M

OUR THE BABADOOK REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Greg King: You can check out Greg’s The Babadook review on www.filmreviews,net.au

Stars(3.5)

 

David Griffiths:

Australia has always been a country known for its cult horror. Whether it be the older Oz-ploitation films like Fair Game that inspired a young Quentin Tarantino or more modern films like Storm Warning, it seems Aussies know their horror. Need further proof? Well the filmmakers behind the original Saw series… also from the land down under. Now comes the latest Aussie horror flick, the low budget The Babdook and once again the Aussies have got it 100% right.

The flick follows hard working widow Amelia (Essie Davis – Burning Man, TV’S The Slap) who tries all she can do to be a good mother to her awkward son Samuel (Noah Wiseman – The Gift). However, things are not always easy for her and as her son’s behaviour seems to push more and more people away things become increasingly worse for them.

Things then turn even more serious when a children’s book mysteriously turns up in the house. After reading the book once to Samuel Amelia realises how dark and disturbing it is. However no matter how she tries to get rid of it the book keeps returning and even worse still is the fact that the horror it speaks about, Mr. Babadook (Tim Purcell – newcomer) now haunts their home in a potentially deadly manner.

Some people may look at the low budget of The Babadook and decide to give it a wide berth but doing so will mean they miss out on one of the best horror films to surface this year. This is a film that really announces Jennifer Kent as a director to watch. Kent has grown up living and breathing horror films her whole life and it certainly shows here. This is clearly the best ‘creepy kid’ horror since Let The Right One In and it blows most of the blockbuster horrors we’ve seen in recent years right out of the water.

Kent knows that it takes more than just a creepy soundtrack and some ‘bumps and screams’ on the audio track to really frighten an audience. Here she combines so good old fashioned psychological terror with one of the creepier characters we’ve seen in the horror genre over recent years. While his name might sound like something out of a Lewis Carroll adventure the Babadook himself is a pretty good horror nasty. The fact that he isn’t afraid to attack children or maim and torture a mother shows that he means business. He along with the suspense of not knowing if any of the characters in the film are suffering from mental means the audience is often on the edge of their or jumping out of them… the two things they should be doing during a horror film.

As a director Kent also gets the best of her cast. She puts both Essie Davis and Noah Wiseman through the ringer throughout this film. Davis has been a star-on-the-rise for awhile now and this really confirms that she is among the most talented actresses in Australia at the moment while Wiseman shows that he is a child actor with a big future ahead of him. For him to constantly deliver on the screen when he is playing a gruelling role and is on screen for nearly every minute of the film really shows just how talented he is.

If you are a horror fan then you won’t want to miss The Babadook. Once again an Australian filmmaker delivers a horror film that is destined to become a cult classic.
Stars(3.5)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3.5)

 

IMDB Rating:  The Babadook (2014) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘The Babadook′: For our full The Babadook review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #80

Trailer:

AFCA

The nominations for the 2013 AFCA Awards are:

BEST FILM: Hail, Lore, The King Is Dead, The Sapphires, Wish You Were Here

BEST DIRECTOR: Wayne Blair (The Sapphires), Amiel Courtin-Wilson (Hail), Kieran Darcy-Smith (Wish You Were Here), Ralph de Heer (The King Is Dead), Cate Shortland (Lore)

BEST ACTOR: Joel Edgerton (Wish You Were Here), Matthew Goode (Burning Man), Daniel P Jones (Hail), Ewen Leslie (Dead Europe), Chris O’Dowd (The Sapphires)

BEST ACTRESS: Toni Collette (Mental), Deborah Mailman (The Sapphires), Felicity Price (Wish You Were Here), Saskia Rosendahl (Lore), Sarah Snook (Not Suitable For Children)

BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE: Marton Csokas (Dead Europe), Liev Schrieber (Mental), Kodi Smit-McPhee (Dead Europe), Antony Starr (Wish You Were Here), Garry Waddell (The King Is Dead)

BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE: Essie Davis (Burning Man), Rebecca Gibney (Mental), Deborah Mailmen (Mental), Jessica Mauboy (The Sapphires), Bojana Novakovic (Burning Man)

BEST SCREENPALY: Amiel Courtin-Wilson (Hail), Cate Shortland & Robin Mukherjee (Lore), Rolf de Heer (The King Is Dead), Keith Thompson & Tony Briggs (The Sapphires), Kieran Darcy-Smith & Felicity Price (Wish You Were Here)

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY: Adam Arkapaw (Lore), Germain McMicking (Hail), Germain McMicking (Dead Europe), Jules O’Loughlin (Wish You Were Here), Garry Phillips (Burning Man), Warwick Thornton (The Sapphires)

BEST EDITING: Jason Ballantine (Wish You Were Here), Martin Connor (Burning Man), Dany Cooper (The Sapphires), Veronika Jenet (Lore), Peter Sciberras (Hail)

BEST MUSIC SCORE: Steve Benwell (Hail), Antony Partos (33 Postcards), Max Richter (Lore), Cezary Skubiszewski (The Sapphires), Graham Tardif (The King Is Dead)

BEST OVERALL PRODUCTION DESIGN: Zohie Castalleno (Hail), Melinda Doring (The Sapphires), Silke Fischer (Lore), Steven Jones-Evans (Burning Man), Graham Walker (Mental)

BEST INTERNATIONAL FILM (FOREIGN LANGUAGE): A Separation, Holy Motors, Le Havre, The Kid With A Bike, The Raid

BEST INTERNATIONAL FILM (ENGLISH LANGUAGE): Argo, Beasts Of The Southern Wild, Deep Blue Sea, Hugo, Moonrise Kingdom

BEST DOCUMENTARY: All The Way Through Evening, I Am 11, Life In Movement, Paul Kelly: Stories Of Me, Searching For Sugarman

The Sapphires

And the nominees are:

FEATURE FILM

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST FILM
Burning Man
Lore
The Sapphires
Wish You Were Here

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTION
Jonathan Teplitzky, Burning Man
Cate Shortland, Lore
Wayne Blair, The Sapphires
Kieran Darcy-Smith, Wish You Were Here

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Burning Man
Mental
Not Suitable For Children
Wish You Were Here

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Lore
The Sapphires

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
Burning Man
Lore
The Sapphires
Wish You Were Here

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST EDITING
Burning Man
The Sapphires
Wish You Were Here
X

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SOUND
Burning Man
Lore
The Sapphires
Swerve

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ORIGINAL MUSIC SCORE
33 POSTCARDS
A Few Best Men
Mental
Not Suitable For Children

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN
Burning Man
Killer Elite
Lore
The Sapphires

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST COSTUME DESIGN
Burning Man
Lore
Mental
The Sapphires

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTOR
Joel Edgerton, Wish You Were Here
Matthew Goode, Burning Man
Chris O’Dowd, The Sapphires
Guy Pearce, 33 POSTCARDS

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTRESS
Toni Collette, Mental
Deborah Mailman, The Sapphires
Felicity Price, Wish You Were Here
Sarah Snook, Not Suitable For Children

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Ryan Corr, Not Suitable For Children
Liev Schreiber, Mental
Antony Starr, Wish You Were Here
Gary Waddell, The King Is Dead!

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Essie Davis, Burning Man
Rebecca Gibney, Mental
Deborah Mailman, Mental
Jessica Mauboy, The Sapphires

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST YOUNG ACTOR
Brenna Harding, Puberty Blues
Ed Oxenbould, Julian
Saskia Rosendahl, Lore
Lily Sullivan, Mental

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
Iron Sky
Killer Elite
The Sapphires
Utopia Girls — How Women Won The Vote

AACTA RAYMOND LONGFORD AWARD
Al Clark

TELEVISION

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST CHILDREN’S TELEVISION SERIES
The Adventures of Figaro Pho
Dance Academy — Series 2
Flea-bitten!
Guess How Much I Love You — The Adventures of Little Nutbrown Hare

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST TELEVISION COMEDY SERIES
A Moody Christmas
Danger 5
Lowdown — Season 2
Shaun Micallef’s Mad As Hell

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LIGHT ENTERTAINMENT TELEVISION SERIES
Adam Hills In Gordon Street Tonight — Series 2
Agony Aunts
Gruen Sweat
The Hamster Wheel — Series 1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST REALITY TELEVISION SERIES
The Amazing Race Australia
MasterChef Australia — Series 4
My Kitchen Rules — Series 3
The Voice

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST TELEVISION DRAMA SERIES
Puberty Blues
Rake — Season 2
Redfern Now
Tangle — Season 3

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST TELEFEATURE OR MINI SERIES
Beaconsfield
Devil’s Dust
Howzat! Kerry Packer’s War
Underground

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTION IN TELEVISION
The Amazing Race Australia
Beaconsfield
Howzat! Kerry Packer’s War
Jack Irish: Bad Debts

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SCREENPLAY IN TELEVISION
A Moody Christmas — Episode 5 “Water Under the Bridge”
Lowdown — Season 2 — Episode 3 “One Fine Gay”
Puberty Blues — Episode 5
Redfern Now — Episode 6 “Pretty Boy Blue”

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTOR IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
Jimi Bani, Mabo
Anthony Hayes, Devil’s Dust
Lachy Hulme, Howzat! Kerry Packer’s War
Richard Roxburgh, Rake — Season 2

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
Ashleigh Cummings, Puberty Blues
Essie Davis, Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries
Susie Porter, Dangerous Remedy
Leah Purcell, Redfern Now

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST GUEST OR SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
Luke Carroll, Redfern Now
Abe Forsythe, Howzat! Kerry Packer’s War
Aaron Jeffrey, Underbelly Badness
Dan Wyllie, Puberty Blues

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST GUEST OR SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
Shareena Clanton, Redfern Now
Mandy McElhinney, Howzat! Kerry Packer’s War
Susan Prior, Puberty Blues
Laura Wheelwright, Underground

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST PERFORMANCE IN A TELEVISION COMEDY
Patrick Brammall, A Moody Christmas
Barry Crocker, The Strange Calls
Damon Herriman, Laid — Series 2
Frank Woodley, Woodley

SHORT FILM

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SHORT ANIMATION
The Hunter
LEGO Star Wars: The Padawan Menace
The Maker
Sleight of Hand

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SHORT FICTION FILM
B I N O
Dumpy Goes to the Big Smoke
Julian
Transmission

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SCREENPLAY IN A SHORT FILM
B I N O
Dumpy Goes to the Big Smoke
Julian
Transmission

DOCUMENTARY

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST FEATURE LENGTH DOCUMENTARY
A Common Purpose
The Curse of the Gothic Symphony
Dr Sarmast’s Music School
Storm Surfers 3D

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DOCUMENTARY UNDER ONE HOUR
All the Way
I Can Change Your Mind About Climate
The Man Who Jumped
Then the Wind Changed

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DOCUMENTARY SERIES
Go Back to Where You Came From
Once Upon a Time in Cabramatta
Singapore 1942 – End of Empire
Sporting Nation

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTION IN A DOCUMENTARY
Dr Sarmast’s Music School
Fighting Fear
Go Back to Where You Came From
Once Upon a Time in Cabramatta

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY IN A DOCUMENTARY
Dr Sarmast’s Music School
Fighting Fear
Go Back to Where You Came From
Storm Surfers 3D

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST EDITING IN A DOCUMENTARY
Chateau Chunder — A Wine Revolution
Dr Sarmast’s Music School
Once Upon a Time in Cabramatta
Storm Surfers 3D

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SOUND IN A DOCUMENTARY
Dr Sarmast’s Music School
Once Upon a Time in Cabramatta
Paul Kelly — Stories of Me
Singapore 1942 – End of Empire