Tagged: Joe Wright

Summary:  An agoraphobic woman living alone in New York begins spying on her new neighbors, only to witness a disturbing act of violence.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates: TBA

VOD Release Dates: 14th May 2021 (Australia), 14th May 2021 (Thailand), 14th May 2021 (UK), 14th May 2021 (USA)

Country: USA

Director: Joe Wright

Screenwriter: Tracy Letts, A.J. Finn (novel)

Cast: Amy Adams (Anna Fox), Donat Balaj (Jacob), Maria Bozeman (Olivia), Haven Burton (Shelly (voice)), Anna Cameron (Alex (voice)), Liza Colon-Zayas (Bina), Rand Guerrero (McNamara), Fred Hechinger (Ethan Russell), Bryan Tyree Henry (Detective Little), Jennifer Jason Leigh (Jane Russell 2), Tracy Letts (Dr. Landy), Anthony Mackie (Ed), Julianne Moore (Jane Russell 1 (Katie)), Gary Oldman (Alistair Russell), Wyatt Russell (David), Jeanine Serralles (Detective Norelli)

Running Time: 100 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia), 15 (UK), R (USA)

OUR THE WOMAN IN THE WINDOW REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ The Woman In The Window Review:

The notion that Hollywood takes an old idea and puts a modern twist on it is not new. With the recent release of director Joe Wright’s (Atonement) new film The Woman In The Window on Netflix it seemed like everybody wanted to point out that this was a story that they had all seen before.

Despite the film’s screenplay actually being based on a novel by AJ Finn the film does mirror the general storyline of Hitchcock’s classic Rear Window and its millennial remake with Shia LaBeouf Disturbia, but having said that The Woman In The Window does have enough differences to be its own film.

The film is told from the perspective of Dr Anna Fox (Amy Adams – Justice League) who is separated from her husband and child and lives suffering from agoraphobia trapped in a house with her boarder David (Wyatt Russell – Overlord) who lives in her basement.

Her life takes a turn for the worst though when she meets her new neighbours Jane Russell (Julianne Moore – Still Alice) and son Ethan (Fred Hechinger – News Of The World), both of which who mention that husband/father Alistair (Gary Oldman – The Dark Knight Rises) is a violent man.

Anna then witnesses Jane murdered in the Russell’s living room but after she reports it to the Police Alistair denies that any murder has taken place and introduces Jane to a new Jane (Jennifer Jason Leigh – Single White Female), but then things another turn when Anna finds a photo of herself sleeping inside her home.

The film relies on the idea that its audience is going to get caught up in the twists and turns of the story which rightfully should see the film become one of the top modern day psychological thrillers. But what the filmmakers don’t seem to take into account is that with similar stories told in cinema over the years that some audience members will see right through those turns. Then as the studio found out in early test screenings there are also so many twists in this film’s plot that some audience members lost track of what was happening and became confused.

As far as being an intelligent psychological thriller The Woman In The Window works but it may not be the kind of film that the average cinema goer will enjoy. Like you would expect from a Joe Wright film there is an artistic edge to the film which some may dislike but at least it isn’t as predictable as recent thrillers like Fatale and Every Breath You Take.

The stand-out of The Woman In The Wndow though are the performances of the cast. Amy Adams is brilliant in the lead role and she is well supported by Gary Oldman playing the vilified Alistair.  Another shining light is Fred Hechinger as the mysterious Ethan. Hechinger is very much the ‘rookie’ of the cast – over the past few years he has had small roles in films such as New Of The World and Eighth Grade but it is here where he really shines and never allows himself to be over-awed acting alongside some of Hollywood’s A-Listers.

The Woman In The Window is an intriguing film. It perhaps is not the best thriller to have surfaced over the past few years but it is a film that certainly will hold the attention of fans of the genre, while casual viewers may not want to see it through to the final credits. Still the film is well worth a look, especially if you are an Amy Adams fan.

The Woman In The Window is available now on Netflix.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Average Subculture Rating:

IMDB Rating:

The Woman in the Window (2021) on IMDb

Other Subculture The Woman In The Window Reviews:

You can read our The Woman In The Window review for The Phuket News here – https://www.thephuketnews.com/the-familiar-woman-in-the-window-80233.php

Trailer:

 

The brand new trailer for The Woman In The Window has just been released. Directed by Joe Wright and starring Amy Adams, Gary Oldman, Anthony Mackie, Wyatt Russell, Brian Tyree Henry, Jennifer Jason Leigh and Julianne Moore the film will be released in Australian cinemas on May 14th, 2020.

In “The Woman in the Window,” an agoraphobic child psychologist befriends a neighbour across the street from her New York City brownstone, only to see her own life turned upside down when the woman disappears and she suspects foul play. A stellar ensemble cast brings Tracy Letts’ screenplay based on the gripping, best-selling novel to life, where shocking secrets are revealed, and no one—and nothing—is what it seems.

Pan

Summary: 12-year-old Peter (Levi Miller) has always thought he was special despite what the nuns at the orphanage tell him. But he doesn’t realise how special he is until he is whisked away in the night and spirited away to Neverland where he is forced to work for Blackbeard (Hugh Jackman) who dreams of ruling the mysterious land.

After a daring escape alongside Hook (Garret Headlund) and Sam Smiegel (Adeel Akhtar), and a chance meeting with Tigerlily (Rooney Mara), Peter learns that he is indeed special and soon sees why Blackbeard wants him dead.

Year: 2015

Australian Cinema Release Date: 24th September 2015

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA, UK, Australia

Director: Joe Wright

Screenwriter: Jason Fuchs, J.M. Barrie (characters)

Cast: Nicholas Agnew (Pilot Primrose), Adeel Akhtar (Sam Smiegel), Orlando Loo Alfred (Yung), Tony Allen (himself), Gabriel Andreu (Matador), Nonsie Anozie (Bishop), Jozef Aoki (Ranger Pirate ‘Wings’), Jamie Beamish (Not-Dobkins), Neil Bell (Baggy), Brian Bovell (Long John Standing), Kathy Burke (Mother Barnabas), Jack Charles (Chief), Cara Delevingne (Mermaids), Kurt Egyiawan (Murray), Salo Gardner (Older Blackbeard), Garrett Hedlund (Hook), Paul Hunter (Daisy), Hugh Jackman (Blackbeard), Paul Kaye (Mutti Voosht), Amanda Lawrence (Sister Joseph), Jack Lowden (Dobkins), Lewis MacDougall (Nibs), Giacomo Mancini (Michelangelo), Rooney Mara (Tiger Lily), Phil Martin (Goliath), Ami Metcalf (Sister Thomas), Levi Miller (Peter Pan), Aaron Monaghan (Robbins), Tae-joo Na (Kawhu), Dean Nolah (Peanut), Michael Ryan (Silverman), Julian Seager (Livingston), Amanda Seyfried (Mary), Mike Shepherd (Fernley Trebilcock), Harry Lister Smith (Pilot Parker), Jimmy Vee (Lofty), Bronson Webb (Steps), Spencer Wilding (Growler), Leni Zieglmeier (Wendy Darling)

Runtime: 111 mins

Classification: PG

 

OUR PAN REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

Pan was always going to be a film that came under a lot of scrutiny and was going to cop a fair whack of criticism. There are some Disney purists out there that believe once Disney has touched a story there is no need for anyone else to explore the story, and while I disagree with that I do agree with the fact that their have been some pretty dreadful movies over the years that have touched on both the Peter Pan and Captain Hook storylines. What I didn’t expect for Pan though was for it to become a film so alternative that some parents are arguing whether or not it is suitable for children to watch or not.

Now I’ll be honest helicopter parents who are too afraid to let their children play in dirt annoy me. They are normally the same kind of parents that will look for the slightest detail in a film that makes it ‘unwatchable’ for kids and then take to social media on a rant, or tell you why you liking the film is wrong! I’ll also admit that I grew up in the generation where films like Never Ending Story and all it’s magic, plus a healthy dose of monsters with chainsaws (I’m looking at you Gremlins) was considered okay for children to watch at the cinema. Having said that I do agree that Pan is not for very small children, but hey if you have older kids and teens then go nuts because the alternative feel to Pan is actually something a little bit refreshing.

Yes there are some problem scenes for small children, Blackbeard has no problem firing guns at children and natives alike while at the same time Tigerlily doesn’t mind getting a little stabby with some sharp objects but there is also a hell of a lot to like about this film as well. For starts director Joe Wright (known for Pride & Prejudice and Hanna to name a few) and screenwriter Jason Fuchs’ choice to include the songs of bands like Nirvana and The Ramones during some of their scenes came as a complete surprise while the aggression of characters like Blackbird seemed to make this feel seem a lot more ‘real’ then what your typical style of ‘slapstick violence’ would have.

Having declared that there were things about Pan that I loved I also have to admit that the film had its weak points. While the film moves along well it seems to lose a lot of its suspense once Peter, Sam and Hook are out in the wilds of Neverland and despite a relatively good flying Pirate ship chase and battle not even this scene seems to have captured the air of suspense that it deserves. It almost felt at times that Wright is the kind of director that can milk suspense out of a dramatic scene, like when Blackbeard first confronts Peter in the captain’s cabin, but is a little bit out of his depth when it comes to huge action sequences.

The same can also be said for the screenplay’s set up of characters. Peter and Blackbeard get wonderful set-ups which in turn allows Hugh Jackman to shine, but then there is the character of Hook, who any Peter Pan fan will tell you becomes a major character in the lead character’s life. Here Hook is a bit of a mystery, and strangely seems to be a nod as a tribute to Indiana Jones.

This also causes an inconsistency in the acting as well. Levi Miller announces himself as a little star with a brilliant performance in his debut lead role but even he is out acted by Hugh Jackman who relishes in the role of the ‘bad guy’ Blackbird. Jackman here puts in a performance here that we have wanted to see Johnny Depp deliver over the past few years. Jackman is completely transformed and unrecognisable and he genuinely becomes one of Hollywood’s meaner screen nasties. Sadly, the film’s poor reception means most cinema lovers will miss out on the performance.

Also stepping up here is Rooney Mara. Sure she doesn’t have anything near as dramatic to work with as she did when she did Girl With A Dragon Tattoo but she does has her moments as Tigerlily. The criticism she has copped for being a white actress playing a ‘native’ role is also ludicrous. If you look around the ‘tribe’ in Pan they seem to be made up of people of all skin colors, including an Australian Aboriginal playing the tribe’s leader, so seriously the complaints are just a few keyboard warriors with very little to do. Be warned if you’re a fan of Amanda Seyfried or Cara Delevingne just beware that their roles are very small indeed.

Pan certainly does not deserve the backlash that it has received as a film. Sure some of the action sequences do not reach the great heights that they should, but for the most part this is a well acted and alternatively fresh film aimed for teens.
Stars(3.5)

 

 

Greg King:

You can read Greg’s full Pan review on www.filmreviews.net.au

 

Stars(2)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3)

 

IMDB Rating:  Pan (2015) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Pan reviews: You can listen to our full Pan  review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #147. You can also read our Pan review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Logo

This week on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Adam, Dave, Greg and Nick take a look at  new release films ‘London Road,’ ‘The Diary Of A Teenage Girl,’ ‘Cut Snake,‘ ‘Pan,’ ‘The Visit,’ and Sicario.’ This episode also contains interviews with Hugh Jackman, Levi Miller, Rooney Mara, Joe Wright, Ed Oxenbould, Olivia DeJonge, James Cullen Bressack (Pernicious), Nick Kozakis (Plague) and Kosta Ouzas (Plague).

Also make sure you are listening this week as the boys announce a very special partnership that The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show has started with DC Comics and Warner Home Video. We kick off this brand new partnership by giving you the chance to win a copy of Gotham Season 1 on DVD or Blu-Ray.

To listen to the show or can download it for free from our Podcast Channel – Listen/Download here.

Hugh Jackman

Academy Award® nominee Hugh Jackman (“Les Misérables”) has been set to star in Warner Bros. Pictures’ upcoming live-action Peter Pan feature for director Joe Wright (“Atonement,” “Pride & Prejudice”). The announcement was made today by Greg Silverman, President, Creative Development and Worldwide Production, and Sue Kroll, President, Worldwide Marketing and International Distribution, Warner Bros. Pictures.

Jackman will portray the villainous Blackbeard in an all-new tale about author J.M. Barrie’s beloved character Peter Pan, the boy who would never grow up.

Silverman stated, “Hugh Jackman always delivers indelible performances that resonate with audiences. We know he will create a Blackbeard who will be a powerful presence in this original Peter Pan adventure.”

Kroll added, “There is a reason that Hugh is known and loved the world over. He is uncompromising in his dedication to every role, and we are all thrilled to be working with him again.”

Best known to audiences worldwide for his portrayal of the Wolverine, Jackman most recently wrapped production on “X-Men: Days of Future Past,” reprising his role as the conflicted Super Hero for the sixth time in that popular film franchise. In addition to an Oscar® nomination, he won a Golden Globe Award and earned a BAFTA Award nomination for his gripping performance as Jean Valjean in 2012’s “Les Misérables.” This past fall, Jackman led an all-star cast in the acclaimed dramatic thriller “Prisoners.” Also an accomplished stage actor, he received a 2004 Tony Award for his performance in the Broadway musical “The Boy From Oz.”

Wright will direct the as-yet-untitled Peter Pan adventure from a screenplay by Jason Fuchs. Greg Berlanti and Paul Webster are serving as producers.

The film is set to release in Australian cinemas July 16, 2015.

Anna Karenina

Summary: The third collaboration of Academy Award nominee Keira Knightley with acclaimed director Joe Wright, following the award-winning boxoffice successes Pride & Prejudice and Atonement, is a bold, theatrical new vision of the epic story of love, adapted from Leo Tolstoy’s timeless novel by Academy Award winner Tom Stoppard (Shakespeare in Love). The story powerfully explores the capacity for love that surges through the human heart.

Set in late-19th-century Russia high-society, the aristocrat Anna Karenina (Knightley) enters into a life-changing affair with the affluent Count Vronsky (Johnson). As Anna questions her happiness and marriage to Alexei Karenin (Law), change comes to all around her.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 14th February, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: UK

Director: Joe Wright

Screenwriter: Tom Stoppard, Leo Tolstoy (novel)

Cast: Marine Battier (Mlle. Roland), Max Bennett (Petritsky), Bodil Blain (Princess Sorokina Senior), Nicholas Blatt (Major Domo), Antony Byrne (Colonel Demin), Tannishtha Chatterjee (Masha), Kenneth Collard (Prince Tverskoy), Sam Cox (Kapitonich), Buffy Davis (Agafia), Cara Delevingne (Princess Sorokina), Michelle Dockery (Princess Myagkaya), Steve Evets (Theodore), Emerald Fennell (Princess Merkalova), Aruhan Galieva (Aruhan), Freya Galpin (Masha Oblonsky), Domhnall Gleeson (Levin), Tillie-Bett Grant (Baby Anya), Carl Grose (Korney), Holliday Grainger (Baroness), Paul Ham (Michael), Byran Hands (Mikhail Slyudin), Hera Hilmar (Varya), Thomas Howes (Yashvin), Giles King (Stemov), Keira Knightley (Anna Karenina), Jude Law (Karenin), Henry Lloyd-Jones (Burisov), Susanne Lothar (Princess Scherbatsky), Kelly Macdonald (Dolly), Matthew Macfadyen (Oblonsky), Eric MacLennan (Matey), Jude Monk McGowan (Tuskevitch), Oskar McNamara (Serhoza), Beatrice Morrissey (Vasya Oblonsky), Cecily Morrissey (Lili Oblonsky), Octavia Morrissey (Tanya Oblonsky), Theo Morrissey (Grisha Oblonsky), Luke Newberry (Vasily Lukich), Raphael Personnaz (Alexander Vronsky), Alexandra Roach (Countess Nordston), Guro Nagelhus Schia (Annushka), Bill Skarsgard (Makhotin), Kyle Soller (Korrsunsky), Aaron Taylor-Johnson (Vronsky), Pip Torrens (Prince Shcherbatsky), Alicia Vikander (Kitty), Eros Vlahos (Boris), Emily Watson (Countess Lydia Ivanova), Olivia Williams (Countess Vronsky), David Wilmot (Nikolai), Ruth Wilson (Princess Betsy Tverskoy)

Runtime: 130 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Anna Karenina’ Review: 

Yet another classic masterpiece of literature finds its way onto the big screen with the ambitious project from director Joe Wright (‘Hanna’, ‘The Soloist’) and screenwriter Tom Stoppard (‘Enigma’, TV’S ‘Parade’s End’), a project that has seen them turn Leo Tolstoy’s epic novel ‘Anna Karenina’ into a two-hour film.

For those who have never been forced to read the novel at school the story Based on the classic novel by Leo Tolstoy the film sees Anna Karenina (Keira Knightley – ‘Stars In Shorts’, ‘Seeking A Friend For The End Of The World’) become involved in an intense love triangle with her wealthy husband, Karenin (Jude Law – ‘Side Effects’, ‘Rise Of The Guardians’) and a young soldier, Vronsky (Aaron Taylor-Johnson – ‘Savages’, ‘Albert Nobbs’). While her relationship with Karenin seems steady, Anna must face potential status ruin if she wants to pursue this new exciting love.

Meanwhile Levin (Domhnall Gleeson – ‘Dredd’, ‘Shadow Dancer’) finally plucks up the courage to ask the beautiful Kitty (Alicia Vikander – ‘A Royal Affair’, ‘The Crown Jewels’) to marry him, but because she is also wrapped up in Vronsky she says no, which in turn shatters Levin and has him sadly wasting away.

To his credit Joe Wright doesn’t exactly rest on his laurels and produce yet another period film, no he instead decides to be a little creative and film most of ‘Anna Karenina’ inside a theatre, the end result is a film in the vein of ‘Moulin Rouge!’ that seems to suggest that this is a very public love affair that needs an audience. This inventive style, which includes sets changing in front of the audience’s eyes, does take a little while to get used to but once you feel that you are in line with the flow it actually ends up looking pretty sensational.

Still Wright is let down a little by Stoppard’s work. The original ‘Anna Karenina’ meanders through a lot of characters lives and sadly it seems that Stoppard seems to include too many of these characters in this film version. The main emphasis needs to on Anna/Karenin/Vronsky love triangle, but while the Levin and Kitty romance is entertaining to watch it seems that throughout the film it gets in the way of the main story, especially when those characters are geographically removed from being anywhere near Anna.

The big plus side to ‘Anna Karenina’ is the acting. Keira Knightley puts in one of her best performances in years and she well supported by Aaron Taylor-Johnson who although very removed from the role that made him famous, in ‘Kick-Ass’) puts in a wonderful performance… as does Alicia Vikander who on the back of her performance in ‘A Royal Affair’ indicates that she has a very big future ahead of her.

Sadly these performances are dragged down by Jude Law who surprisingly puts in one of his few poor performances. It seems as though he feels that the character of Karenin should never show emotion on his face, which seems like a poor choice seeing Karenin shows emotion in the film a lot – whether it be sadness or anger.

As far as modern blockbusters go ‘Anna Karenina’ is well worth a look. Wright’s interesting and inventive visual styling certainly brings something to the film, although there are a couple of lulls in the film that have been known to put audience members to sleep.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Anna Karenina′: Check Episode #20 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Anna Karenina’. Dave Griffiths also has another review of ‘Anna Karenina’ available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Rating: 3/5

IMDB Rating:Anna Karenina (2012) on IMDb