Tagged: Veronica Ferres

Summary:  Set against the backdrop of the opioid epidemic, stories of an undercover cop, a professor, and a grieving mother collide in this dramatic thriller from writer/director Nicholas Jarecki.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates: 18th March 2021 (Australia), 26th February 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: 5th March 2021 (USA)

Country: Canada, Belgium

Director: Nicholas Jarecki

Screenwriter: Nicholas Jarecki

Cast: Paul Aharani (Customs Inspector Fournier), Rodney Alexandre (Frankie), Benz Antoine (Detective Carson), Michel Aranov (Minas), Eric Bruneau (Guy Broussard), Bill Bryk (David Reimann), Charles Champagne (Cedric Beauville), Jay Chevery (Agent E. Thomas), Lily-Rose Depp (Emmie Kelly), Martin Donovan (Lawrence Morgan), Charles Ebbs (Franklin), Luke Evans (Dr. Bill Simons), Veronica Ferres (Dr. Meg Holmes), Tony Garrn (Sarah), Alex Gendreau (Davidson), Nouella Grimes (Dean Sharon Jones), Armie Hammer (Jake Kelly), Nicholas Jarecki (Stanley Foster), Marcel Jeannin (Harold Morgan), Daniel Jun (Jun), Hiro Kanagawa (Dr. Ishiyama), Kid Cudi (Ben Walker), Greg Kinnear (Dean Talbot), Mia Kirshner (Susan), Hugo B. Lefort (Billy – RCMP), Evangeline Lily (Claire Reimann), Duke Nicholson (Derrick Millebran), Gary Oldman (Dr. Tyrone Brower), Michelle Rodriguez (Supervisor Garrett), Noah Ruscica (Simon Gilcrest), Sara Sampaio (Ines), Frank Schorpion (Coach Vogel), Linda E. Smith (Anne), Kwasi Songui (Red), Ellora Torchia (Reeva), Admen Tsekhmen (Armen), Indira Varma (Madira Brower)

Running Time: 118 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia), 15 (UK), R (USA)

“Dreamland” Day06, Photo: Jan Thijs 2019

OUR CRISIS REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Crisis Review:

I do love big action blockbusters as much as the next film fan, but I have to admit that I wish all blockbusters were like Crisis. This has everything that I want in a blockbuster – suspense, good acting and a script that has been well thought and plotted out by its screenwriters. It is also doesn’t need to have an explosion or a car chase in every scene to keep the interest going.

The well written script is the work of screenwriter/director Nicholas Jarecki (Arbitrage) who uses the backdrop of the opioid epidemic in the USA as a way for the stories of three characters living three very different lives to collide.

First there is Jake Kelly (Armie Hammer – The Lone Ranger) who is working undercover in a bid to bring down both one of the biggest importers and largest exporters of opioids coming across the US and Canadian border. While he is stepping along a very dangerous line he feels that he is now being rushed by his superior (Michelle Rodriguez – The Fast & The Furious) which may bring everything crashing down in the case.

Then there is Claire Reimann (Evangeline Lilly – Ant-Man) who is a recovering opioid addict who is just trying to get her life back on track when suddenly she leans that there is a possibility that her son’s disappearance may have something to do with the murky underworld of Detroit.

Last but certainly not least is Dr Tyrone Brower (Gary Oldman – The Dark Knight) a well-respected professor at a University that relies on grants and paid research work to keep going. When he and his students are asked to test a new addictive-free drug that a pharmaceutical company is planning on releasing they find it is not as addictive-free as the company believes. What happens when he confronts the company about his findings soon finds him under a threat that he could never have predicted.

The brilliance of Crisis all starts with the writing of Jarecki. I’ll admit that I became a fan of his after his amazing film Arbritage blew me away back in 2012. With that film Jarecki created an under-rated suspenseful thriller that brought out the best of its cast which included Richard Gere, Susan Sarandon and Brit Marling. With Crisis Jarecki recaptures that magic.

To say that Jarecki has created a slow-burn thriller with Crisis is an understatement. This isn’t a film fuelled by suspense through action, Jarecki and his cast can get just as much suspense out of scene with Kelly in a bar with a gangster or Brower sitting at a board-room meeting when his future is being determined then most director/screenwriters can get out massive robot fights or stunning car chases. As a director Jarecki also knows how to use his environment to his advantage and by teaming up with cinematographer Nicolas Bolduc (War Witch) he uses the snowscapes of Canada and Detroit to bring a harshness to the film that further enhances the bleakness told in the story.

Also like Arbritage is the fact that Jarecki’s screenplay here brings out the best in the film’s cast. For a long time I have seen Armie Hammer as a pretty-boy actor. While his looks lend him well to roles such as the ones he has had in The Man From U.N.C.L.E. and The Lone Ranger his acting range has been lacking. Here though Hammer shines as a drug agent in over his head – finally it seems like he found an acting role where he could showcase his acting talent sadly at a time when his career maybe at the crossroads.

The screenplay here also sees Evangeline Lilly steps up as a distraught mother trying to overcome her past demons with an emotional performance that once again reminds us of her acting abilities outside franchises. Also brilliant here is Gary Oldman, but then when isn’t he brilliant? Here he uses his theatrical training to great effect and he is sensational in some of the film’s more suspenseful scenes.

I should also point out though that I did find a flaw with this film. It did feel like the film tried to bring in too many characters. Characters like Kelly’s drug addicted sister Emmie (Lily-Rose Depp – Yoga Hosers) seem superfluous and just make the film run a little longer than it really should. All in all though Crisis is a must see thriller for cinema-goers out there that like a good slow-burn thriller.

A beautifully written script lends its hand to some great acting performances with a film that reminds us that often the line between pharmaceutical companies and drug dealers is often blurry.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Kyle McGrath’s Crisis Review:

Kyle’s rating Out Of 5:

Average Subculture Rating:

IMDB Rating:

Crisis (2021) on IMDb

Other Subculture Crisis Reviews:

Nil.

Trailer:

Hector And The Search For Happiness

Summary: A psychiatrist searches the globe to find the secret of happiness.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 23rd October, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: UK, Canada, Germany, South Africa

Director: Peter Chelsom

Screenwriter: Maria von Heland, Peter Chelsom, Tinker Lindsay, Francois Lelord (novel)

Cast: Barry Atsma (Michael), Sebelethu Bonkolo (Baruti), Toni Collette (Agnes), Bernard Cuffling (Professor Niedorf), Jakob Davies (Young Hector), Veronica Ferres (Anjali), Bruce Fontaine (Malcolm), Chris Gauthier (Roger), S’Thandiwe Kgoroge (Marie Louise), Aiden Longworth (Jack), Hannah Longworth (Daisy), Tracey Ann Oberman (Pathetic Jane), Anthony Oseyemi (Marcel), Simon Pegg (Hector), Rosamund Pike (Clara), Christopher Plummer (Professor Coreman),  Jean Reno (Diego Baresco), Stellan Skarsgard (Edward), Chad Willett (Alan), Ming Zhao (Ying Li)

Runtime: 119 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR HECTOR AND THE SEARCH FOR HAPPINESS REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Greg King: You can check out Greg’s Hector And The Search For Happiness review on www.filmreviews.net.au

Stars(3)

 

Dave Griffiths:

Human betterment has been the in thing for a few years now so it’s not surprising that it has crept into cinema with films like Eat, Pray, Love and The Secret Life Of Walter Mitty. Now all the way from the United Kingdom comes Hector And The Search For Happiness with the unlikely pairing of Simon Pegg and Rosamund Pike.

Based on Fracois Lelord’s best-selling novel the film centres around Hector (Simon Pegg), a psychiatrist who suddenly realises that he is being no help to his patients as he is not happy himself, actually he doesn’t even know what the meaning of happiness really is.

In a bid to answer the big question he decides to temporally leave his near perfect girlfriend, Clara (Rosamund Pike), and embarks on a worldwide journey to try and find what other people believe is true happiness.

Now to the credit of the filmmakers here, namely director/screenwriter Peter Chelsom (who normally makes fluff like Serendipity and Hannah Montana: The Movie), Hector And The Search For Happiness is a film that has some surprising twists and turns. Chelsom could have just taken the easy way out and have chosen to make this a film in the vein of Eat, Pray, Love and had Hector just swanning around some of the world’s most beautiful locations but instead he has Hector suddenly thrown into a world of Asian prostitution with nasty pimps, brutal warlords, drug kingpins and African refugee camps. Certainly I never came into this film expecting that I would suddenly be confronted with scenes that would leave me wondering whether or not Hector would survive, but that is exactly what happens with the end product here.

In fact there are few movies in the past that have mixed comedy and drama together as well as Hector And The Search For Happiness does. For Hector to be one moment talking about Tintin (yes a well placed little in joke at Simon Pegg’s expense) and then the next be begging for his life in an African cell with a gun to his head is as far as extremes can go. Remarkably it also works well throughout the film even if some of the early laughs do feel a little forced.

The suspense even to seems to life more and more as the film goes on. Not only do we have scenes where Hector’s life is at risk but there is a steady stream of suspense that revolve around Hector and Clara’s brief Skype calls which seem to start suggesting that the relationship may not last as long as the once happy couple would wish it to. In fact by the time that Hector is waiting on a Californian beach for his past love, Agnes, the audience is swept up into a very emotional ‘will they, won’t they’ state.

Hector And The Search For Happiness does have a fairly major weakness though. While Simon Pegg puts in a wonderful acting performances that shows that he can now be considered one of those actors who can really shine when it comes to putting in a dramatic role away from his normal comedic genre, a lot of the other cast is massively under used. On the back of Rosamund Pike’s Oscar rumored performance in Gone Girl she is completely wasted in the role of the highly strung Clara. Meanwhile even Stellan Skarsgard, Jean Reno, Christopher Plummer and Toni Collette only get to play one-dimensional characters that never get enough screen-time to really show what they are capable of.

Still Hector And The Search For Happiness is a highly enjoyable film. It does suck you in in a way that you wouldn’t predict when the film starts. Chelsom shows that’s he is an inventive filmmaker with some creative moments in which he makes Hector’s inner thoughts and his notebook sketches come to life on the screen. The film’s real mix of comedy and drama keeps its audience well and truly entertained while it also allows Simon Pegg the opportunity to show that he has the acting ability to be in films of real substance and not just the weaker comedies that he has been doing recently. Hector And The Search For Happiness is a thought provoking film that deserves more credit than it has currently been receiving.

Stars(3.5)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3.5)

 

IMDB Rating: Hector and the Search for Happiness (2014) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Reviews of ‘Hector And The Search For Happiness′: For our full Hector And The Search For Happiness review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #102 . Dave’s Hector And The Search For Happiness review can also be viewed on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer: