Tagged: Omar Metwally

Non-Stop

Summary: An air marshall must spring into action aboard an international flight.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 27th February, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA, France

Director: Jaume Collet-Serra

Screenwriter: John W. Richardson, Christopher Roach, Ryan Engle

Cast: Jon Abrahams (David Norton), Josh Bodenhamer (Giovanni), Nadia Bowers (Mrs. O’Reilly), Alejandro Cardenas (Arturo Lucci), Edoardo Costa (Herve Philbert), Frank Deal (Charles Wheeler), Michelle Dockery (Nancy), O.T. Fagbenle (Jack Rabbitte), Jason Butler Harner (Kyle Rice), Corey Hawkins (Travis Mitchell), Christine Hitt (Camila D’Agostino), Charlotte Kirk (Amy Harris), Perri Lauren (Stella), Quinn McColgan (Becca), Scoot McNairy (Tom Bowen), Omar Metwally (Dr. Fahim Nasir), Julianne Moore (Jen Summers), Anson Mount (Jack Hammond), Liam Neeson (Bill Marks), Lupita Nyong’o (Gwen), Bar Paly (Iris Marianne), Nate Parker (Zack White), Amanda Quaid (Emily Norton), Linus Roache (David McMillan), Corey Stoll (Austin Reilly), Liz Thomas (Madeline), Michael Thomas Walker (Michael Tate), Shea Whigham (Agent Marenick)

Runtime: 106 mins

Classification:M

OUR NON-STOP REVIEWS & RATINGS

David Griffiths:

Remember the time when you could sit down and watch a good action thriller and you wouldn’t actually know who the bad guy was until just before the end credits? That certainly hasn’t been the case over the past few years when you’ve sat down to watch a Hollywood thriller but the good news is that director Jaume Collet-Serra manages to recapture the thriller feeling of old once again with Non-Stop.

Liam Neeson again seems to have forgotten that he once said he would never make action films and this time brilliantly plays Bill Marks, a jaded former New York cop who is battling an alcohol problem and depression while working as an air marshall.

The day in question starts off just like any other for Bill, he is not only fighting a killer headache as the morning goes on but also feuding with his ex-wife. Then while boarding the flight he sees that he has his usual bunch of suspects to protect – the rude and obnoxious Travis Mitchell (Corey Hawkins) who seems to think the world revolves around him and the nervous child flyer Becca (Quinn McColgan). At least as he settles into his routine he does notice some friendly faces around including his friend Nancy (Michelle Dockery) and the chatty passenger he is seated next to the mysterious Jen Summers (Julianne Moore).

But then shortly after take-off the flight suddenly becomes anything but ordinary when Bill receives a text message telling them that has twenty minutes to place $150 million in a bank account or people start to die. Quickly Bill tries to work out which passenger could be involved – perhaps it is the Muslim gentleman Dr. Fahim Nasir (Omar Metwally), the jittery Austin Reilly (Corey Stoll) or the flight crew member who was rushed onto the flight at the last moment, Gwen (Lupita Nyong’o). However it is they are good at their job and Bill soon realises this when it seems like they are making him look like the person that is behind the hijacking.

Creating the perfect thriller is also a double edged sword for a director or a screenwriter. The fact that they can call upon the fact that nearly everybody has a small hint of being a nervous flyer can really enhance the film but the fact that an entire movie also has to be kept in such a small space can also prove too much for many filmmakers and their films end up lacking that certain something that holds the audience’s suspense all the way through.

The basic criticism that many will level at Non-Stop is that Neeson is playing the same character he played in Taken, and that is true to a certain extent, but there also seems to be more of a sense of realism around his character here. Yes Bill is substance affected while he is supposed to be looking after a plane full of people, but just like you did with Denzel Washington in Flight you quickly warm to the character, which only raises the suspense even further when those on the ground begin to assume that Bill is in fact the hijacker.

Credit also has to be paid to a great script that pretty much leaves the audience with no idea who the real hijacker is until it is supposed to be revealed… the way it should be with a good thriller. The script is further enhanced by director, Jaume Collet-Serra who feeds the audience false paths all the way along, something that works and just makes the elusive hijacker even harder to pick.

Non-Stop further cements Liam Neeson as one of the best action stars going around at the moment. He mixes dramatic acting and action sequences together with absolute ease and he is well supported by the likes of Julianne Moore and Michelle Dockery who also do credible jobs. Kudos also to Scoot McNairy and Corey Stoll who don’t have to do much but still have a couple of screen stealing moments.

Non-Stop is one of the better thrillers to have surfaced over the past few years and if you are a young filmmaker who wants to learn all the ins and outs of this genre then this is one film you just have to check out.

Stars(3.5)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3.5)

IMDB Rating:  Non-Stop (2014) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Non-Stop′: Nil.

Trailer:

Summary: In the highly anticipated final chapter of the blockbuster series The Twilight Saga, the newfound married bliss of Bella Swan and the vampire Edward Cullen is cut short when a series of betrayals and misfortunes threatens to destroy their world. Edward has finally fulfilled Bella’s wish to become immortal. But the arrival of their remarkable daughter, Renesmee, sets in motion a perilous chain of events that puts the Cullens and their allies against the Volturi, the fearsome council of vampire leaders, setting the stage for an all-out battle.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 15th November 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Bill Condon

Screenwriter: Melissa Rosenberg, Stephanie Meyer (novel)

Cast: Joe Anderson (Alistair), Marlane Barnes (Maggie), Blythe Barrington-Hughes (Renesmee (7 Years), Charlie Bewley (Demetri), James Campbell Bower (Caius), Patrick Brennan (Liam), Cameron Bright (Alec),MyAnna Buring (Tanya),  Billy Burke (Charlie Swan), Christie Burke (Renesmee (Young Woman)), Christian Camargo (Eleazar), Tate Clemons (Renesmee 5 Years), Abigail Rose Cornell (Renesmee 4 Years), Lateef Crowder (Santiago), Daniel Cudmore (Felix), Valerie Curry (Charlotte), Peter Facinelli (Dr. Carlisle Cullen), Dakota Fanning (Jane), Eliza Faria (Renesmee 4 Years), Noel Fisher (Vladimir), Mackenzie Foy (Renesmee), Janelle Froehlich (Yvette), Andrea Gabriel (Kebi), Maggie Grace (Irina), Ashley Greene (Alice Cullen), Tracey Heggins (Senna), Christopher Heyerdahl (Marcus), Lisa Howard (Siobhan), Isabella Iannuzzi (Renesmee 4 Years), Julia Jones (Leah), Masami Kosaka (Toshiro), Casey LaBow (Kate), Taylor Lautner (Jacob Black), Kellan Lutz (Emmett Cullen), Amadou Ly (Henri), Rami Malek (Benjamin), Mia Maestro (Carmen), Omar Metwally (Amun), Erik Odom (Peter), Lee Pace (Garrett), JD Pardo (Nahuel), Robert Pattinson (Edward Cullen), Wendall Pierce (J.Jenks), Andrea Powell (Sasha), Marisa Quinn (Huilen), Jackson Rathbone (Jasper Hale), Nikki Reed (Rosalie Hale), Elizabeth Reaser (Esem Cullen), Anglea Renai (Minister Weber), Alex Rice (Sue Clearwater), Taylor Diane Robinson (Renesmee 5 Years), Angela Sarafyan (Tia), Michael Sheen (Aro), Judith Shekroni (Zaffrina), Chaske Spencer (Sam Uley), Rachel St. Gelais (Renesmee 5 Years), Booboo Stewart (Seth), Kristen Stewart (Bella Cullen), Kailyn Stratton (Renesmee 5 Years), Bill Tangradi (Randall), Toni Trucks (Mary), Billy Waggenseller (Vasilii), Guri Weinberg (Stefan), Milli Wilkinson (Renesmee 4 Years)

Runtime: 115 mins

Classification: M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 2’ Review:

Whoever made the decision to split The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 2 into two films has a lot of answering to do. Director Bill Condon (The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1, Tilda) saves himself with a brilliant looking battle scene, but the damage is done, the fact that the last novel in the series had to be stretched out to four hours of screen time means there is just too much filler to make the films as good as they could have been.

Part 2 in the Twilight conclusion sees Bella Cullen (Kristen Stewart – Snow White & The Huntsman, On The Road) learning about her newly acquired vampiric skills and tendencies as she finally rises as the vampire she has wanted to be for quite a long time. However her notions that life will now be easy as she is married to Edward (Robert Pattinson – Cosmopolis, Bel Ami) are quickly broken when she learns that her fast-growing daughter Renesmee (Mackenzie Foy – TV’S Hawaii Five-O & R.L. Stine’s The Haunting Hour) who has been in-printed to the ever-present werewolf Jacob (Taylor Lautner – The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1, Abduction).

Further dramas arise when the Cullen’s jealous cousin Irina (Maggie Grace – Taken 2, TV’S Californication) mistakes Renesmee for an immortal child. She then tells The Volturi that the Cullen’s have broken on of the vampiric cardinal sins and turned a child. The result is the Volturi led by vindictive Aro (Michael Sheen – Jesus Henry Christ, The Gospel Of Us) and his prized colleague Jane (Dakota Fanning – The Motel Life, Now Is Good) coming for the Cullens with death as the penalty. Not to be disturbed Carlisle Cullen (Peter Facinelli – Loosies, TV’S Nurse Jackie) and the other Cullens search the world for vampires that believe their story and will help defend them against the Volturi.

The saving grace for The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1 is the fact that Condon has filmed an amazing battle sequence and that together with screenwriter, Melissa Rosenberg (Breaking Dawn Part 1, Eclipse) has created a brilliant twist/reveal that will have anyone that hasn’t read the novels on the edge of their seats. As far as film reveals go it is right up there amongst the best.

But sadly Breaking Dawn Part 2 is dragged down by the fact that in a bid to stretch the film out both Condon and Rosenberg have had to spend way too much concentrating on things that could have been done in montages – mediocre things like Renesmee meeting all of the Cullen’s allies and Bella learning all of her vampiric skills and tendencies. There is also a small problem with the ending as their seems to be no closure for Bella with her father, Charlie (Billy Burke – TV’S Revolution & The Closer) or with any of her friends (who actually don’t appear in this film).

When it comes to the cast both Kristen Stewart and Robert Pattinson are both below par, a surprise considering both of shown in films outside of the Twilight franchise that they do have some acting ability. Taylor Lautner actually takes a huge step forward (perhaps he’s trying to make up for Abduction), but the standout is Michael Sheen who shines as Aro.

Breaking Dawn Part 2 is an okay closure for this film series but it’s sad realising that it could have been better if they had combined Part 1 and Part 2and just scrapped some of the filler.


Other The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 2 Reviews By Dave Griffiths: http://www.helium.com/items/2392774-the-twilight-saga-breaking-dawn-part-2-movie-review

Rating: 3/5 Stars

IMDB Rating: The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 2 (2012) on IMDb