Tagged: Angela Sarafyan

Summary: 
Nick Bannister, a private investigator of the mind, navigates the alluring world of the past when his life is changed by new client Mae. A simple case becomes an obsession after she disappears and he fights to learn the truth about her.r.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates:  19th August 2021 (Australia), 24th September 2021 (Thailand), 20th August 2021 (UK), 20th August 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: 27th September 2021 (Australia), 20th August 2021 (USA)

Country: USA

Director: Lisa Joy

Screenwriter: Lisa Joy

Cast: Mojean Aria (Sebastian Sylvan), Barbara Bonilla (Frances), Giovannie Cruz (Cindy), Brett Cullen (Walter Sylvan), Cliff Curtis (Cyrus Boothe), Marina de Tavira (Tamara Sylvan), Gabrielle Echols (Titch), Rebecca Ferguson (Mae), Roxton Garcia (Freddie), Rey Hernandez (Harry), Myles Humphus (Moe), Hugh Jackman (Nick Bannister), Jorge Longoria (Lorenzo), Natalie Martinez (Avery Castillo), Andrew Masset (Butler), Sam Medina (Falks), Javier Molina (Hank), Thomas Francis Murphy (Armin), Thandie Newton (Emily ‘Watts’ Sanders), Norio Nishimura (Harris), Nico Parker (Zoe), Angela Sarafyan (Elsa Carine), Han Soto (Wesley Humphrey), Daniel Wu (Saint Joe), Teri Wyble (Angela)

Running Time: 116 mins

Classification: M (Australia), 13 (Thailand), 12A (UK), PG-13 (USA)

OUR REMINISCENCE REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Reminiscence Review:

When Hugh Jackman hung up his Wolverine boots… um claws… he made the statement that one of the reasons for the decision was so that he could tackle very new and different roles. Of course one of his first performances outside of the Marvel universe was a return to his all-singing and all-dancing roots with his acclaimed performance in hit musical The Great Showman, and now Jackman heads into a whole new alternative sphere as he takes on the role of a noir Detective in Reminiscence.

Written and directed by Lisa Joy (TV’s Westworld) Reminiscence is set in a futuristic world where most of the world has flooded and a Great War occurred over the land that remains. Two veterans of that war are Nick Bannister (Jackman) and Emily ‘Watts’ Sanders (Thandie Newton – Mission: Impossible 2). Watts is in love with Nick, not that he notices that or that she would ever admit it, and together they run a business that allows people to use a technologically advanced tub that allows the subject and those watching to access their past memories.

During the war the device was used to interrogate prisoners but today it is used by people who want to remember a happier time from their life, however that doesn’t mean that Nick doesn’t sometimes use the tank to help out the Police.

However everything changes for Watts and Nick when the very beautiful Mae (Rebecca Ferguson – Doctor Sleep) turns up one day and asks to use the tank to help find some lost keys. Upon witnessing her memories, which include watching her perform as a cabaret singer, Nick becomes captivated by Mae, something that Watts is instantly alarmed by.

Things then take another turn after Nick completely falls in love with Mae but then has her mysteriously disappear. As Watts warns him digging into Mae’s past may uncover some things and an underground world that he doesn’t want to be part of.

There is very little doubt that as a filmmaker Lisa Joy has been completely influenced by the Detective noir genre. As you watch Reminiscence you can see Hugh Jackman channelling the likes of Humphrey Bogart throughout his performance and to Joy’s credit she is a smart enough director to make the illusion work without ever becoming a parody.

At time in the film Rebecca Ferguson takes on the class of Marilyn Monroe and the persona of Jessica from Who Framed Roger Rabbit and it is that style of acting that suits the noir kind of world that Joy has created. To her credit though Joy goes one step further than that and instead of just setting the film back in the 1960s she instead creates a futuristic world that at times lends itself to the scenes at hand and never dominates the occurrences happening in the film.

Jackman’s acting style also lends itself to the noir/war genre blend that Joy has created. He walks the walk of a noir style Detective but at the same time has a Civil War veteran feeling around him that comes to the fore in the scenes when he is meeting with people from Mae’s past.

Joy alongside her cinematographer Paul Cameron (Gone In 60 Seconds) has created a steam-punk futuristic world that looks amazing up on the screen. The art design of the film is amazing and the fact that Joy and Cameron use little things to enhance the world it is set in makes for an absolute visual feast for the audience. As a viewer it is almost welcoming to be watching a film where the director/screenwriter doesn’t need over-the-top special effects to move the story along. Some of the most memorable moments of this film is seeing characters like Nick, Watts or Mae walking past post-war water towers and having them just in the background without Joy or Cameron feeling like that needs to be the focal point of the scene. It takes a very special filmmaker to realise something like that in what is their feature film directional debut.

At times Reminiscence is a strange film. This is more the kind of film that will be loved by people that have enjoyed films like Blade Runner in the past rather than someone who is going to enjoy the latest Marvel blockbuster and it is certainly a must see for anyone fascinated by noir steam-punk worlds.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Average Subculture Rating:

Other Subculture Reminiscence Reviews:

Nil

Trailer:

From writer/director/producer Lisa Joy comes Warner Bros. Pictures’ action thriller “Reminiscence,” starring Hugh Jackman, Rebecca Ferguson and Thandiwe Newton.

Nick Bannister (Jackman), a private investigator of the mind, navigates the darkly alluring world of the past by helping his clients access lost memories. Living on the fringes of the sunken Miami coast, his life is forever changed when he takes on a new client, Mae (Ferguson). A simple matter of lost and found becomes a dangerous obsession. As Bannister fights to find the truth about Mae’s disappearance, he uncovers a violent conspiracy, and must ultimately answer the question: how far would you go to hold on to the ones you love?

Alongside Oscar nominee Jackman (“Les Misérables,” “The Greatest Showman”), Ferguson (upcoming “Dune,” the “Mission: Impossible” films) and Newton, (“Solo: A Star Wars Story”), the film stars Cliff Curtis (“The Meg,” “Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw”), Oscar nominee Marina de Tavira (“Roma”), Daniel Wu (TV’s “Into the Badlands,” “Warcraft”), Mojean Aria (TV’s “See” and “Dead Lucky”), Brett Cullen (“Joker”), Natalie Martinez (“The Stand” and “The Fugitive” series), Angela Sarafyan (“Westworld”) and Nico Parker (“Dumbo”).

Joy (“Westworld”) makes her feature film directing debut with “Reminiscence,” and directs from her own original screenplay. The film is produced by Joy, Jonathan Nolan, Michael De Luca and Aaron Ryder. The executive producers are Athena Wickham, Elishia Holmes and Scott Lumpkin. Joy’s creative team includes several of her “Westworld” collaborators, including director of photography Paul Cameron, production designer Howard Cummings, editor Mark Yoshikawa and composer Ramin Djawadi, along with costume designer Jennifer Starzyk (“Bill & Ted Face the Music”).

Summary: In the highly anticipated final chapter of the blockbuster series The Twilight Saga, the newfound married bliss of Bella Swan and the vampire Edward Cullen is cut short when a series of betrayals and misfortunes threatens to destroy their world. Edward has finally fulfilled Bella’s wish to become immortal. But the arrival of their remarkable daughter, Renesmee, sets in motion a perilous chain of events that puts the Cullens and their allies against the Volturi, the fearsome council of vampire leaders, setting the stage for an all-out battle.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 15th November 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Bill Condon

Screenwriter: Melissa Rosenberg, Stephanie Meyer (novel)

Cast: Joe Anderson (Alistair), Marlane Barnes (Maggie), Blythe Barrington-Hughes (Renesmee (7 Years), Charlie Bewley (Demetri), James Campbell Bower (Caius), Patrick Brennan (Liam), Cameron Bright (Alec),MyAnna Buring (Tanya),  Billy Burke (Charlie Swan), Christie Burke (Renesmee (Young Woman)), Christian Camargo (Eleazar), Tate Clemons (Renesmee 5 Years), Abigail Rose Cornell (Renesmee 4 Years), Lateef Crowder (Santiago), Daniel Cudmore (Felix), Valerie Curry (Charlotte), Peter Facinelli (Dr. Carlisle Cullen), Dakota Fanning (Jane), Eliza Faria (Renesmee 4 Years), Noel Fisher (Vladimir), Mackenzie Foy (Renesmee), Janelle Froehlich (Yvette), Andrea Gabriel (Kebi), Maggie Grace (Irina), Ashley Greene (Alice Cullen), Tracey Heggins (Senna), Christopher Heyerdahl (Marcus), Lisa Howard (Siobhan), Isabella Iannuzzi (Renesmee 4 Years), Julia Jones (Leah), Masami Kosaka (Toshiro), Casey LaBow (Kate), Taylor Lautner (Jacob Black), Kellan Lutz (Emmett Cullen), Amadou Ly (Henri), Rami Malek (Benjamin), Mia Maestro (Carmen), Omar Metwally (Amun), Erik Odom (Peter), Lee Pace (Garrett), JD Pardo (Nahuel), Robert Pattinson (Edward Cullen), Wendall Pierce (J.Jenks), Andrea Powell (Sasha), Marisa Quinn (Huilen), Jackson Rathbone (Jasper Hale), Nikki Reed (Rosalie Hale), Elizabeth Reaser (Esem Cullen), Anglea Renai (Minister Weber), Alex Rice (Sue Clearwater), Taylor Diane Robinson (Renesmee 5 Years), Angela Sarafyan (Tia), Michael Sheen (Aro), Judith Shekroni (Zaffrina), Chaske Spencer (Sam Uley), Rachel St. Gelais (Renesmee 5 Years), Booboo Stewart (Seth), Kristen Stewart (Bella Cullen), Kailyn Stratton (Renesmee 5 Years), Bill Tangradi (Randall), Toni Trucks (Mary), Billy Waggenseller (Vasilii), Guri Weinberg (Stefan), Milli Wilkinson (Renesmee 4 Years)

Runtime: 115 mins

Classification: M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 2’ Review:

Whoever made the decision to split The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 2 into two films has a lot of answering to do. Director Bill Condon (The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1, Tilda) saves himself with a brilliant looking battle scene, but the damage is done, the fact that the last novel in the series had to be stretched out to four hours of screen time means there is just too much filler to make the films as good as they could have been.

Part 2 in the Twilight conclusion sees Bella Cullen (Kristen Stewart – Snow White & The Huntsman, On The Road) learning about her newly acquired vampiric skills and tendencies as she finally rises as the vampire she has wanted to be for quite a long time. However her notions that life will now be easy as she is married to Edward (Robert Pattinson – Cosmopolis, Bel Ami) are quickly broken when she learns that her fast-growing daughter Renesmee (Mackenzie Foy – TV’S Hawaii Five-O & R.L. Stine’s The Haunting Hour) who has been in-printed to the ever-present werewolf Jacob (Taylor Lautner – The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1, Abduction).

Further dramas arise when the Cullen’s jealous cousin Irina (Maggie Grace – Taken 2, TV’S Californication) mistakes Renesmee for an immortal child. She then tells The Volturi that the Cullen’s have broken on of the vampiric cardinal sins and turned a child. The result is the Volturi led by vindictive Aro (Michael Sheen – Jesus Henry Christ, The Gospel Of Us) and his prized colleague Jane (Dakota Fanning – The Motel Life, Now Is Good) coming for the Cullens with death as the penalty. Not to be disturbed Carlisle Cullen (Peter Facinelli – Loosies, TV’S Nurse Jackie) and the other Cullens search the world for vampires that believe their story and will help defend them against the Volturi.

The saving grace for The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1 is the fact that Condon has filmed an amazing battle sequence and that together with screenwriter, Melissa Rosenberg (Breaking Dawn Part 1, Eclipse) has created a brilliant twist/reveal that will have anyone that hasn’t read the novels on the edge of their seats. As far as film reveals go it is right up there amongst the best.

But sadly Breaking Dawn Part 2 is dragged down by the fact that in a bid to stretch the film out both Condon and Rosenberg have had to spend way too much concentrating on things that could have been done in montages – mediocre things like Renesmee meeting all of the Cullen’s allies and Bella learning all of her vampiric skills and tendencies. There is also a small problem with the ending as their seems to be no closure for Bella with her father, Charlie (Billy Burke – TV’S Revolution & The Closer) or with any of her friends (who actually don’t appear in this film).

When it comes to the cast both Kristen Stewart and Robert Pattinson are both below par, a surprise considering both of shown in films outside of the Twilight franchise that they do have some acting ability. Taylor Lautner actually takes a huge step forward (perhaps he’s trying to make up for Abduction), but the standout is Michael Sheen who shines as Aro.

Breaking Dawn Part 2 is an okay closure for this film series but it’s sad realising that it could have been better if they had combined Part 1 and Part 2and just scrapped some of the filler.


Other The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 2 Reviews By Dave Griffiths: http://www.helium.com/items/2392774-the-twilight-saga-breaking-dawn-part-2-movie-review

Rating: 3/5 Stars

IMDB Rating: The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 2 (2012) on IMDb