Tagged: Robin McLeavy

Blinky Bill The Movie

Summary: Blinky Bill (voiced by Ryan Kwanten) the mischievous koala is devastated when his father, Bill Koala (Richard Roxburgh) leaves their home town and goes exploring in the outback but hasn’t returned after twelve months. Despite promising his mother (Deborah Mailman) that he won’t Blinky heads off to look for him.

Soon Blinky is joined by an accidentally freed zoo koala named Nutsy (Robin McLeavy) and a crazy filled neck lizard called Jacko (David Wenham) as he battles the dangerous outside world in a bid to find his Dad. The journey is made even more dangerous by the fact that they are being pursued by a cranky cat (Rufus Sewell) who wants to make the koalas his dinner.

Year: 2015

Australian Cinema Release Date: 17th September 2015

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Australia, USA

Director: Deane Taylor, Noel Cleary, Alexs Stadermann, Alex Weight

Screenwriter: Not listed

Cast: Toni Collette (Beryl/Cheryl (voice)), Barry Humphries (Wombo (voice)), Ryan Kwanten (Blinky Bill (voice)), Deborah Mailman (Blinky’s Mum (voice)), Robin McLeavy (Nutsy (voice)), Barry Otto (Mayor Cranklepot (voice)), Richard Roxburgh (Bill Koala (voice)), Rufus Sewell (The Cat (voice)), David Wenham (Jacko (voice))

Runtime: 91 mins

Classification: G

 

OUR BLINKY BILL THE MOVIE REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

Blinky Bill is one of those children’s characters that never seems to go out of fashion. Created by author Dorothy Wall in 1933 generations of Australian children have grown up loving Blinky in the countless television shows, books and two movies that have told the larrikin koala’s stories over the years. Now in 2015 Blinky gets a resurgence and unlike so many other characters that have been re-invented for the kids over the years this is one character’s story that still holds up.

Aside from trying to make a character cool for the younger generation that has been around for over 80 years there are a few other hurdles that director Deane Taylor has had to overcome with Blinky Bill The Movie. First of all is trying to get kids who have grown up on the slick animation of Pixar to warm to a movie that uses some old fashioned style animation. The key it seems in this case was to come up with a story that transcends generations and here the filmmakers seem to have done that well. Not surprisingly when you consider that Taylor has worked on some legendary animation projects over the years including Popeye, Casper, The Flintstones, Pink Panther, Footrot Flats and Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas the film does conjur up that simple old time animation story of a character on an adventure while being pursued by a character wanting to put an end to it – yes Sewell’s cat here is like the Will-E Coyote or Elmer Fudd characters of old.

Taylor brings a simplistic style to the film’s storytelling and it ends up working. To be honest there is nothing new here but for some reason the audience finds themselves barracking for the little koala and his friends and while some of the gags are a little childish there are some other humorous moments in there that are obviously designed to bring a smile to older audience members. Like the Ginger Meggs stories there are some things about Blinky that are a little questionable about whether today’s parents are okay with their children watching it but for the most part this is a fairly innocent film. Some serious issues around refugees and conservation does get a look in with the screenplay but just like Oddball this isn’t a film that you are going to walk out of and feel like you have been preached at with.

One of the obvious things about Blinky Bill The Movie is that this is a film that seems to be aimed at an international audience rather than just an Australian audience. The inclusion of big name actors like Toni Collette, Barry Humphries, Ryan Kwanten and Richard Roxburgh do give this film a lot of credibility while the inclusion of so many lovable forms of Australian wildlife could just give this film a life outside of Australia if it is marketed right.

Blinky Bill The Movie does nothing wrong. A simple story that has you barracking for the young koala as he outruns the villainous cat is very Looney Tunes like, while the script is smart enough to also include some touching moments about the relationship between a father and a son. Blinkey Bill The Movie is mainly for younger children but certainly won’t put an adult to sleep, it’s just innocent fun.

 

 

 

 

Stars(3)

 

 

Stars(3)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3)

 

IMDB Rating: Blinky Bill the Movie (2015) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Blinky Bill The Movie reviews: Blinky Bill The Movie with be reviewed in an upcoming episode of The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show.

Trailer:

 

Summary: Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter explores the secret life of our greatest president, and the untold story that shaped our nation. Visionary filmmakers Tim Burton and Timur Bekmambetov (director of Wanted) bring a fresh and visceral voice to the bloodthirsty lore of the vampire, imagining Lincoln as history s greatest hunter of the undead..

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 2nd August, 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: 5th December, 2012

Country: United States

Director: Timur Bekmambetov

Screenwriter: Seth Grahame-Smith

Cast: Frank Brennan (Senator Jeb Nolan), Cameron M. Brown (Willie Lincoln), Dominic Cooper (Henry Sturges), Marton Csokas (Jack Barts), Jaqueline Fleming (Harriet Tubman), Lux Haney-Jardine (Young Abraham Lincoln), Curtis Harris (Young Will), Alex Lombard (Gabrielle), Anthony Mackie (Will Johnson), Joseph Mawle (Thomas Lincoln), Robin McLeavy (Nancy Lincoln), John Neisler (Rev. Dresser), Dane Rhodes (Captain Slash), John Rothman (Jefferson Davis), Rufus Sewell ((Adam), Jimmi Simpson (Joshua Speed), Alan Tudyk (Stephen A. Douglas), Benjamin Walker (Abraham Lincoln), Erin Wasson (Vadoma), Mary Elizabeth Winstead (Mary Todd Lincoln)

Runtime: 105 mins

Classification:MA15+

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter’ Review:

As a film Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter seemed doomed before it even opened in cinemas. People judged the film by the title itself and came up with the conclusion that the film must be a comedy. Let’s be blunt the film is anything but a comedy, anyone that has seen the work of director, Timur Bekmambetov (Yolki 2, Six Degrees Of Separation) will now that he doesn’t shoot comedy. No Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter is just as action-packed and just as gory as his two massive hits Wanted and Nightwatch.

Based on a  graphic novel by Seth Grahame-Smith (TV’S The Hard Times Of RJ Berger & Vendettas), who also coincidentally wrote the screenplay here, the film tells the story of Abraham Lincoln (Benjamin Walker – Westward!, Coach) in a way that the history books certainly don’t. Here Lincoln is a young man who swears vengeance on Jack Barts (Marton Csokas – Dead Europe, Dream House) a business owner who Lincoln sees kill his mother.

Through a chance meeting with the mysterious Henry Sturges (Dominic Cooper – My Week With Marilyn, Captain America: The First Avenger), Lincoln learns that Barts is a vampire and that America is full of them. Sturges trains Lincoln and soon he is a vampire hunter who is sworn to protect humans from the likes of Adam (Rufus Sewell – All Things To All Men, TV’S Mystery!) who has a very nasty (and bloody) plan for America.

Of course, Lincoln chooses to ignore the ‘no friends for a Vampire Hunter’ regulation and soon his friends Will Johnson (Anthony Mackie – Man On A Ledge, 10 Years), Joshua Speed (Jimmi Simpson – Hello I Must Be Going, TV’S Breakout Kings) and love of his life Mary (Mary Elizabeth Winstead – Smashed, The Thing) are all mixed up in this deadly battle.

The fact that some people believe that Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter is going to be a cheesy film is almost insulting as it is anything but. Bekmambetov makes this a stylish action film, that despite the fact he falls back on the slow-motion shots too much, generally looks good. His fight scenes are well chorographed and certainly don’t spare the audience from the violence at hand, while the scene of the train crash on the bridge is one of the best sequences you will see on the big screen this year.

Credit must also be made to Seth Grahame-Smith who does a sensational job with the script. His fictional part of the story fits well into the non-fiction side of Abraham Lincoln’s life and despite the fears of many it never feels like this film is insulting to one of America’s greatest leaders.

If you like well put together action films then you certainly won’t be disappointed with Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter.

Other ‘Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter’ Reviews By Dave Griffiths:http://www.helium.com/items/2354425-movie-reviews-abraham-lincoln-vampire-hunter-2012

Rating: 4/5 Stars

IMDB Rating:Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter (2012) on IMDb